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fHE 

pk BYSTREET 
b/FILHDOM 




i XXIII No. 1 



The Franchise 

O. C. C. Likely to Adept Resolu- 
tion Today and 'x ^i & ^." 
Threatened Suit 

The regular weekly meeting of the 

■ 0. C. C. is scheduled today at the 
(Stor. For some time past there has 
een discussion among some of the 
more important members as to the 
desirability of bringing court action 
V' behalf of some members for the 
nirpose of "clearing up" the situation 
is it exists locally with regard to the 
ub franchise of Asso. First National. 

One of the leaders of the local or- 
anization said on Saturday how- 
■ver, that the statement issued by 
Resident Lieber of First National, 
cas "so fair that it would seem to 
'e the right idea to carry out his sug- 
estion— in other words if anyone is 
issatisfied with First National's 
ub franchise let it work out as he 
uggests." 

It will be recalled that last "Sprint; 
he T. 0. C. C. had serious ideas as 
o the franchise and discussed the 
natter at some length with Senator 
Walker. 



Ludvigh Sails 

E. J. Ludvigh, general counsel of 
"amous, with Mrs. Ludvigh, sailed 
>n the Olympic Saturday, for a brief 
'acation. 



Jackie Coogan Going to Europe 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Hollywood — Jackie Coogan is go- 
ng to London and the continent. He 
will complete "Toby Tyler" before 
starting. 

Hays Back 

Will Hays is scheduled to return 
:oday after spending the holidays in 
Sullivan. Ind. 

Abe Warner, of Warner Brothers, 
is due to arrive today from the Coast. 

Hairy B. Rosen Dead 
Harry B. Rosen, age 46, chairman 
jf the executive committee of the 
Harriman Nat'l Bank, died early 
Saturday morning, after but one 
lay's illness of pneumonia. 
His funeral took place on Sunday. 
The financial help, which the late 
Harry Rosen furnished many men in 
:he industry, is a matter of history. 



Dinner Called Off 

David R. Hochreith, sales- 
man for Fox Film, who was 
back 1§ the before noted 
"PtospeTity Dinner" scheduled 
( Jan^ 11 at the Astor has 
[led off" the event. He says 
fill be held at a later date. 




ZfcRECOCNIZEl 

Authority 




Tuesday, January 2, 1923 




Price 5 Cents 



Johnny Hines' latest, "Sure Fire Flint," packing 'em in at B. S. Moss' 
Cameo theatre this week, repeating the success it has had everywhere. 
Doris Kenyon, Edmund Breese, Robert Edeson, Effie Shannon and J. Bar-'-' 
ney Sherry are included in the all-star cast. — Advt. 

Negative Costs 

Reaching too high. Mounting out of sight. What's to be 
done? Something, surely. Because you can't stretch a rubber 
band too far. It's bound to snap. And so with prices. 

If they don't come a tumbling. Something's going to snap. 
One of the best known men in the business. In the producing 
and distributing field. Says prices were never as high as today. 
He's right. They are. And they are too high. 

It's an old story. And an old laugh. That you never 
hear of anything in this business. But "million dollar" pictures. 
Those that have grossed that much during 1922. Can be 
counted on the fingers of one hand. And you'll still have a finger 
or two to spare. Then you hear a lot of the half million babies. 
And you can count them. Anything less than $300,000 gross. 
Well, you never hear of it. 

But— 

If all the distributing companies were honest. (What horse 
laugh do you hear?) And would give the figures of the gross. 
On the average picture released during 1922. You can bet the 

bankroll. That the average won't show $300,000 oss. Not 

exhibition value, but money paid in. 

There's too much being spent for story material. Too much 
for names— that mean too little at the box office. Too much for 
overhead. Too much for everything entering production. With 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Officers Elected 

Exhibitors Distributing Concern Have 

Offices in the Same Building 

With Nat'l Headquarters 

The Theater O rp. 

announce the election of 
ing officers: President, \V. A 
Hartford, Conn.; Vice-Pn 
Harry Davis, Pittsburgh, 
urer, L. J. Dittmar, Louisville, K 
Secretary, W. D. Burfonl. Am 
111. 

While no announcement is made*! 
the stationery of the Distribul 
Corp. indicates that Sydni 
hen, President of the M. P. T. O. A., 
is Chairman of the Board 
rectors. 

The same announcement contaii 
notice to the effect that permani 
headquarters have been secured at 
25 VV. 43rd St. This is the same 
building in which offices of the Na- 
tional M. P. T. O. A.— the Exhibito 
organization — is located. The an- 
nouncement also : 

"The development oi the l orpoj 
tion's work m the matter of providing 
meritorious pictures to theater 
ers at fair prices and in other ways 
introducing equitable conditions into 
the industry will be commenced at 
once. 

"Regional meetings will be h»ld in 
different sections of the country, and 
the purpose of the work of the Cor- 
poration explained to the theater own- "' 
ers." 



Speculation among film folk has 
somewhat died a> to the probable 
outcome of the exhibitors' $5,000,000 
distributing organization, but one of 
the prominent members of the New 
York State organization which, as i 
well known, is not in sympathy wi 
the Cohen organization, said on S 
urday that, judging from the way 
which the organizers of the n 
movement were working it wo 
take somewhere in the ni 
of a year or more before the < 
itors organization functioned to a se- 
rious extent. He pointed out that 
something like several week- had al- 
ready elapsed since the first meeting 
in Chicago where the idea was launch- 
ed, and that in the interim, excepting 
for a brief discussion ot the idea in 
Philadelphia, apparently no other 
meetings had been held. 

In this connection it may prove of 
interest to point out that a well known 
distributor, commenting on the ex- 
hibitor plan, is authority for the 
statement that "if the exhibitors hope 
to get any product for next s 
they had better arrange for it now, 
otherwise they may find themselves 
blocked out when they start work on 
the coast." 



/ 

! 



THE 




W.HIII No.1 Tuesday, Jan. 2,1923 Price 5 Cents 

» 

Copyrijrht 1922, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS. INC. 

Joeeah Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 

J. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 

a gar; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 

Eatarad at aeccr.^-class matter May 21, 1918. 

at the post office «t New York, N. V., under 

the act of March 3, 1879. 

Term* (Postage free) United States Outside 

of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 

month*. $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 

$15.00. Subscribers should remit with order 

Address all communications to THE FILM 

DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 

N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-553* 

Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 

4411 Hollywood Blvd 'Phone, Hollywood 

1603. 

Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
saan. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Are., London, W. 1. 
Pari* Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

dicky. 
Ceatral European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau, Prague ( Czech o- Slo- 
vakia), Wenselsplatz. 

Quotations 

High Low Close Sales 

East. Kod. 90y 2 87% &7M 5,000 

F. P.-L. . . 90J4 8734 90 1,000 

do pfd. . 97J4 97y 4 97% 100 

G'wyn ... 5 4% 4% 2.000 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's ... 19^ 19 19 1,800 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 

Urges Censors in Missouri 
St. Louis — The Missouri Sunday 
School Asso. has taken steps toward 
tht introduction in the State Legis- 
lature of a bill for a censorship of 
moving pictures. This has resulted 
from the recent reinstatement of 
Arbuckle. 



BS8T THEATRES EVERYWHERE 

are usiag the following ad. mats in then 

aewspaper advertising 



BIG ADDED LAUGH * 

HAZEL FROM HOLLYWOOD" 
D0R0THYDEVORE Ghristieeomedu 

SEE THE MOVIES KID THEMSELVES 




tm at all Educational Exchanges on al 

new Christie Comedies 
An sach in time draws nine" 






THE SPICS OF THE PROGS. >.M' 



JUPITER FILM CORP. 

1482 Broadway 

New York 

We buy rights only for entire 

Latin America. 




DAILY 



Tuesday, January ?, J 9 



y 



Negative Costs 



(Continued from Page 1) 

the result that the average socalled "big" picture, has a nega- 
tive cost of approximately $150,000 before it gets going. Then 
add a 35 per cent distribution on that, and the cost of prints, 
the advertising, and the interest on the investment before it pays 
out in about 18 months. And the picture just has to do some- 
thing like $300,000. Before the producer receives any real money. 

All of which is all wrong. Everything is geared too high. 
Everything is too impossibly high for a sound business. The 
quicker producers get down on negative costs the better. The 
more pictures that have box-office value that can be turned out at 
$75,000 the quicker everybody in this business is going to get off 
to a better start. 

This doesn't mean that the socalled "big" pictures shouldn't 
be made. And if they have a real box office value they will be 
shown. The Warners made two of the best box office bets 
of the year. "Why Girls Leave Home" and "Schooldays." 
They cost less than $40,000 and $60,000 respectively. Every- 
body made money out of them. 

But who made any money out of "Nero"? Fox didn't — 
that's a bet. Exhibitors didn't. That's a certainty. Who did? 
And so it goes — right down the line. Yet "Over the Hill" made 
Fox a fortune. And cost comparatively little. 

You don't make "big" pictures by spending a lot of money. 
You don't make big box office successes that way either. "Mil- 
lion dollar" pictures are accidents. Half million rarities. Good, 
week in and week out pictures — the kind that every house has 
to play regularly, costing over $100,000 to $150,000 inevitably 
spell ruin. 

Gentlemen, what are you going to do about it? 
BIG WESTERN'S 

May be a bet. Don't know why they have been overlooked 
so long. First National just secured "Girl of the Golden West." 
For next season special. Should cash in. 

Can't understand why the big producers haven't done more 
of this. Hardly any type of picture so popular through country 
as "Western's." Ask the small town exhibitor. He'll tell you 
they invariably go. Some sections, of course, where they don't — 
but not many. So it's about time one of the big fellows came 
along with a real "Western" background and plot. 

Now this doesn't mean that every producer in the business. 
Need rush into making a "Western." 

ELLJAY'S RETIREMENT 

Turned the business over to his boys. Sounds good. But — 

and it's some But — you'll notice Elljay is still Chairman of the 

Board. Of both of his companies. Which means that Pop will 

keep his eye on the youngster's. While they grow their wings. 

TALKING ABOUT BOYS 

Means this "infant" industry is getting a bit older. Almost 
old enough for long pants. Adolph Zukor's son, Eugene, is 
over at Famous. Own office and everything. In Metro Arthur 
and David Loew. Real business-like. Only take an hour- 
prompt-at lunch-are growing up with the business. And so you 
find it all over. Bill Fox hasn't any sons. But they say he reads 
all the scripts. To his daughters. And Carl Laemmle's daugh- 
ter — bright, smart girl — is a real authority on modern literature 
and plays. 

THOSE MILLIONS 

Smart aleck press agent for Arthur Hammerstein. Got 
story printed that his boss. Would pay three million. For the 
Arbuckle negatives held by Famous. He would, would he? But 
he hasn't. And what's more. He won't. 

If anybody offered Famous a lot less than three million 
iron men for those three Arbuckle's. Now on the shelf. The 
way the offer would be grabbed. Would make a piker. Of the 
fastest 100 yard man. In any college. By the way. You'd better 
set down. Awaiting the release of those Arbuckle's. By Famous. 
You may get tired standing up. 

(Continued on Pag* 4) 



Circuts Rook "Plui der" 

Pathe reports "leals clo. 1 :d with the ' 
following circuits for "Plunder"; Wil- | 
mtr & Vincent, Sou. Ente 1 ., 
Saenger's and Hostettier"s. 



- 






&fotAadet 



T 




Phone — Beekman 9991 
7T* . I r4 CS5P ° "££Co . ' 



tEAL 




SERVICE 



119 Fulton St., N. Y. 

INSURANCE EXPERTS 

TO THE THEATRICAL AND 

MOTION PICTURE INDUSTRY 



Mr. Exhibitor: :v . 

Ask Your Film Company for the* 

''THEMATIC; MUSIC CUE SHEET 



(Pat, Applied FoV) ^ 

It means more to yott , than any 
other accessory. It is the cue sheet 
that insures a musically perfect 
picture presentation. 



EXPERIENCED 
Theatre Manager 

now managing a representative 

house 
Desires To Change Connections 

Thoroughly efficient in exploita- 
tion and presentation work. 
Qualified to furnish highest 

references 

1 

Address 
B-969, c/o The Film Daily 



Internationa/ Distribu'teis of 
MOTION PICTURES 



Ikter-Ocean Film Corporation - 



INTER-OCEAN .^UILDING.rj 

218 WEST 42n'd ST. NEW YORK • 

Bryant n\b^-, _: 

WHEN YOU THI " 
FOREIGN THINK' OP 

I ; N.TER-OAiA 









Tuesday, 



January 2, 1923 




On Broadway 

This Week 
A s t o r — "The Town That Forgot 

God." 
Broadway— "Kick In." 
Brooklyn Strand — "Dr. Jack." 
Cameo — "Sure Fire Flint." 
Capitol — -"The Stranger's Banquet." 
Criterion — "Salome." 
Loew's New Yor k — Tuesday — 

"When Love Comes" and "The 
Power of a Lie." 

Wednesday — "Anna Ascends." 

Thursday — "Shadows." 

Friday — "A Dangerous Game" and 
"Calvert's Valley." 

Saturday — "A Dai ling of the Rich." 

Sunday — "Quincy Adams Sawyer." 
Lyric — "Robin Hood." 
Rialto— "Back Home and Broke." 
Rivoli — "My American Wife." 
Strand— "Dr. Jack." 

Next Week 
Astor— "The Third Alarm." 
Broadway — Not yet determined. 
Brooklyn Strand— "Kick In." 
Cameo — Not yet determined. 
Capitol — "Gin mie." 
Criterion — "Salome." 
Rialto — Not yet determined. 
Rivoli — Not yet determined. 
Strand — "One Exciting Night." 

New German-Russian Combine 
Berlin — The oldest German com- 
pany, the Mutoscop and Biograph Co. 
of Berlin, which will soon celebrate 
the 25th anniversary has concluded 
an alliance with "The Flaming Torch 
Ltd." of Moscow, Russia, providing 
for an exchange of productions and 
collaboration between German and 
Muscovite stars. 



Injunction in Film Case 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
New Orleans — The Pearce Film 
Co. has been granted a preliminary 
injunction against H. F. Wilkes and 
Southern Enterprises restraining 
them from showing in any theater in 
Louisiana and Miss. "A Woman 
Above Reproach." The firm claims 
it signed a contract in 1921 with the 
Anywoman Film Co. for the exclusive 
right in the two states and alleges 
that Southern Enterprises has been 
encroaching on its territory. 



U. F. A. Sued For 700 Million Marks 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Berlin — Joe May has sued the 
U. F. A. for damages to the tune of 
700 million marks. May complains 
that the U. F. A. sold his serial "The 
Mistress of the World" to U. S. and 
in spite of a special provision in the 
contract that the film should not be 
changed, such cuttings and alterations 
were made by the American buyer 
that the picture was entirely spoilt. 
It was due to these cuttings, says 
May, that the film not only lost all 
cl'.ances of success, but was rejected 
by the American public. This failure, 
May pretends, damaged his reputa- 
tion in such a way as to prevent fur- 
ther sales of his productions. He 
values the damage sustained at 700 
million marks or about $80,000. 

It may be mentioned in this con- 
nection that the producer of the 
French super-feature "Atlantide" also 
complained some time ago in the 
French trade organs that his work 
was "barbarously mutilated" by the 
Yankees. 



Canadian Notes 



(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

St. John, N. B.— G. W. Kerr, has 
been appointed manager of the h'a- 
mous-Lasky office here, having come 
from Montreal, where he was former- 
ly with the Anglo-Canadian exchange. 

A new producing company is in the 
offing. The intention is to start pro- 
ducing in the spring, beginning with 
one and two reelers. The Joe Lavelle 
stories may be used for a series of 12 
two reelers. 



German Film Exports 

Berlin — -Exports of exposed films, 
favored by the low German currency 
has incresaed considerably during the 
second half of the year. 7,215,000 
metres or about 22 million ft., were 
exported during the 3d quarter of the 
year, against approximately 10 million 
ft. in the first 3 months of 1922. The 
high water mark was reached in Sep- 
tember last with three 2 million 
metres. 

Raw film exports from July to Sep- 
tember were still higher, being valued 
at more than 700 million marks. Prin- 
cipal buyers for exposed films were 
Austria and succession states of 
Austria-Hungary, also Spain, while 
raw stock mostly went to America, 
Italy. France, Austria. 

Imports show, on the other hand, 
a marked decrease, their value was 
only about 4 millions of marks. 

On the other hand, "Penalty" feat- 
uring Lon Chaney, was presented in 
Berlin with such fearful cuts, ordered 
by the Censors, as to become quite 
nonsensical. 



New Theaters 

Chicago — A new 
cost in the neighh 
is planned by Kudolpl 



Chicago — A new hou<<* 

building will be built i 
ty William li. Malos. 



Kcndalville, 111.— The Colonial h 
been reopened by Charley Cohen. 



Brooklyn, N. Y. — Leon Greenfe 
who owns the Eden will s . n op< 
the Atlantic. 

New Bedford, Conn.— The Da- 
open. 



Lodi, Cal.— A 1,300 seat hoi-, 
being planned here by Alex Saloi 



Sanford, Fla. — Ground has bet 
broken here for a new house to r 
operated by the Milane Amusemei 
Co 

Doylestown, Pa. — Nick Powt 
will erect a house at Hamilton 5. 
aid Oakland Ave. Plans for cot 
struction are now under way. 



Carlisle, Pa. — D. S. Cooper, pr. 
prietor of the Orpheum, will ere>*- 
t.ew and larger house here. 



Baltimore — The Metropolitai 
North and Penn. Ave. opt' 

Bethlehem, Pa.— Bethlehem The; 
ter Corp. will build here. Construe 
tion will start early in the Sprin- 
Will seat 2,UUU. 



Erie. Pa.- 
the State. 



-Jacob Roth has opet» 



THE SUPER 39 

George Melford's 



production 



a 



Java Head 



yy 



No. 7 



with Leatrice Joy, Jacqueline Logan, Raymond Hatton^ George Fawcett and Albert Roscoe 
By Joseph Hergesheimer Adapted by Waldemar Young 

Released March 5th 



A GREAT big special production, from 
the famous Saturday Evening Post 
story by one of the most popular of modern 
authors, the man who wrote "Tol'able 
David." Made on the original locations, in 
the most picturesque part of America. 



The story deals with an American who 
brings home a Chinese wife, and has the 
same kind of box-office appeal as "East is 
West." 

It is enacted by one of the greatest casts 
of the season, and is a real special in every 
way, and a box-office knockout. 



* 



No. 2 "Dark Secrets." 

No. 3 "My American Wife.' 




No. 4 

No. 5 
No. 6 



"Drums of Fate." 
"Nobody's Money." 
"Adam's Rib." 



CC Qaramounl Qiclure 




WATCH THIS 
SPACE 
TOMORROW 
FOR 

o 



THE 



■cBtl 



DAILY 



Tuesday, January 2, 1923 



Negative Costs 

(Continued from P»ge 1) 

THE PASS PROBLEM 
Every exhibitor has it. Big nuisance. But there's always a 
ot i 1 .oiks. Who have to get them. Which reminds of what 
lappened to Bill Swanson. Years ago. At his house in Salt 
^ake. Gave a Mormon Bishop a pass. Reading "Admit Bishop 
lunter and Family." Shortly after the good Bishop arrived 
vith his family. And the pass. And Swanson had to seat eight 
vives and 30 kids. After that Bill discontinued passes to Mor- 
nons- „ 

EXHIBITOR DISTRIBUTION 
Important man. One of the most important in business. 
ilking of exhibitor-distribution. "To arrange a distributing 
ichine is simple," he said. "But what of the product; what of 
- pictures? That's where the trouble will come from. Of course 
..; v will get pictures. But what kind? And how will they 
gear the distributing machine? To handle a few specials. Or 
a lot of average product? And what do they know of distribu- 
ting problems; much less those of production? To talk about 
doing it — yes — but actually doing it. Well that will prove an- 
other story." DANNY. 



Southwestern Notes 

El Dorado, Ark.— The Rex whwh 
«.s burned recently is being rebuilt. 



Knglewood, Texas — The Queen 
badly damaged by fire. 



Tyler, Texas- 
$750 occurred 
adwiy. 



—Fire to the extent of 
in the booth of the 



Galveston — So. Enter, has leased 
I'remont with lease terms of $400 
monthly. 



Austin — F. B. Roberts has been ap- 
pointed Manager of the Majestic, 
succeeding R. P. Whitefield. 



Marshall, Texas — The Palace has 
been taken over by George T. Tram- 
,rne!l from the So. Enter. 

Dallas, Texas — D. Campbell has 
'een made booker for R. D. Lewis 
Film Co. 



Dallas — Specialty Film Co. has 
moved into the old quarters of the 
Asso. First National. 



Corsicana, Tex. — The C. J. Mussle- 
• en have taken over the Palace form- 
ower«. 



Drumright, Okla.— R. W. Elrod 
has taken over the management of 
the Strand and will change from 
vaudeville to first run pictures. 



Chillicothe, O. — M. Kaiser has 
purchased the Royal. Formerly op- 
erated the Kingston at Kingston, O. 



Macon, Mo. — Beginning the first of 

the year, the Illmo Amuse. Co., will 

[ control the Princess here. Wallace 

Akin will be - manager. The Illmo 

j owns the Yale at Shelbyville, 111. 

Cincinnati, O. — The Fountain The- 
aters Corp., a subsidiary of Famous 
Players, have purchased property on 
"tb. Street from the Henry 

ate for $175,000, erect- 

n the site. 



Theater Changes 

Earlville, Iowa — Snyder Brothers 
have taken over the Gem. 



Joe Saeli has taken back the Rex 
at California, Pa. 



Shiner, Texas — The Gem Theater 
has closed. 



Brackenridge, Pa. — The Luna was 
taken over by John Moskola. 



Enid, Okla. — The Criterion, de- 
stroyed by fire, will be rebuilt and 
ready for opening in Spring. 



Guthrie, Iowa — George Schwein- 
nicker purchased the McLuen here. 



Sandusky, O. — The Plaza has 
been remodeled. Arthur Himelmein 
manager. 

Burleson, Texas — M. J. (Jake) 
Cohen has leased the old Palace and 
will remodel. 



Seymour, Texas — Elbert Holmes 
has purchased the Criterion. 

Mission, Texas — R. N, Smith has 
taken over the management of the 
Mission. 



Pine Bluff, Ark.— The Berbig has 
reopened under L. U. Kassinelli. 
Roland Segel and O. Prince. 



Brooklyn, N. Y. — Harry Seglin has 
taken over the Strand formerly own- 
ed by John Whipen. 

Troy, N. Y. — Elmer Crownshield 
who operates the Bijou has purchased 
the Hudson Theater, Watervliet. 



Kansas City, Mo. — L. A. Wallace 
bought the Bancroft from W. L. Mc- 
Dowell. 



Kansas City — The Gillham, sub- 
urban house was leased by the Gill- 
ham Amuse. Co. from Robert 

Rhoades. 



Montreal — The Victoryscope has 
been sold to A. Blanchard by J. Asta- 
phan. 



TITLES 



NEGATIVE 
POSITIVE 
Inch CARDS 

15 CENTS PER FOOT 

24 Hour Service if necessary 

SIMPLEX TITLE SHOP 

220 W. 42d Street Bryant 0985 



CHAS. 0. BAUMANN, Prc 

RESOURCES - $5,000,000 
— LEGAL RATES — 



PRODUCERS & STARS 

represented. Also every form oi 
financial service rendered in connec- 
tion therewith — at legal rates. 



GREAT NORTHERN FINANCE CORP 

Knickerbocker Building 

Broadway at 42nd Street, N. Y. City 
Telephone Bryant 2989 



Warns Against "Brother" 

Rudolph Valentino writes: 
"I am informed that one, Antonio 
Muzii, of 500 W. 112th St., has been 
representing and holding himself 
out to be my brother. I write this 
letter to inform you that the said 
Muzii is in no way related to me. 

"You are requested to take no ad- 
vertising given you by anyone in 
which the said Antonio Muzii is ex- 
ploited under the name 'Valentino.' " 



Edward Dillon Productions, Inc. 

announces that 

it has in preparation 

an elaborate screen version 

of 

"Broadway 



Gold" 



by W. Carey Wonderly 

(by arrangement with Young's Magazine) 

Title and all Rights fully Protected 



Distribution 

TRUART FILM CORPORATION 

1540 Broadway, New York 



Reproductive quality enables the sensitive 
emulsion to correctly portray every step of 
gradation from highest light to deepest 
shadow. 

EASTMAN 
POSITIVE FILM 

faithfully reproduces every tone of the 
negative. It carries the quality through 
to the screen. 

Eastman Film, both regular and tinted base — 
now available in nine colors, is identified through- 
out its length bv the words "Eastman" "Kodak" 
stenciled in black letters in the transparent margin. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



LITTLE ADS WITH BIG THOUGHTS 



The only place of its kind in 
the World 

LLOYDS FILM STORAGE 



JOS. R MILES 

Film Storage Vaults 
Cutting Rooms 
Projection Theatres 

Packing for domestic and ex-: 

port shipment 
Film Library 
Editing and Titling 

Custom Clearances and For- 
warding -i 

130 W. 46th St. Bryant 5600 



Experience 

Studying the plans and problems of 
numerous diversified lines for many 
years has given us an experience that 
comes to few. It is at your service. 

W. A. FLEMING & CO. 

Public Accountants and Business 

Advisors 

452 Fifth Ave. Tel. Longacre 9074 



THE 



Barnes Printing Company 



I n c. 



Phone Watkins 14 16-17 

Increased Facilities for 
Printing Colored Inserts, 
Heralds, Programs, etc. 

"We Never Disappoint" 



229 W. 28th SL, New York City 



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Watch this page every Monday. Exhibitors 
can find here the little things that help to build 
patronage. Producers the little things that 
go to make big pictures and Distributors 
the little big ideas that make for success. 



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THE 



Putting It Over 



-JEW; 



DAILY 



Tuesday, January 2, 19; 



Here is how a brother exhibitor put his show over. Send along 
vour ideas. Let the other fellow know how you cleaned up. 



Exploiting "Via Radio" 

Educational in collaboration with 
Scientific American, has arranged an 
elaborate exploitation c; lpaign on 
the one-reel special "Via Radio." A. 
C. Lescarboura, managing editor of 
Scientific American, is sending mate- 
rial for talks on this picture to every 
broadcasting station in the United 
States. Scientific American will also 
carry a story in the January issue 
on the instructive value of the pic- 
ture. 

Watertown, S. D. — Harry Keller 
at the Colonial put over "Sherlock 
Holmes" by using 20 bronze frames 
with photos and wording "See John 
Earrymore in 'Sherlock Holmes' at 
Colonial. He placed these frames in 
all hotels, cafes and department, drug 
and clothing stores, also used fifty 
window cards and hit almost every 
window in Watertown with one. Ar- 
ranged with Watertown Public Opin- 
ion for Newsboy and Carrier Party 
for opening night, boys paraded from 
Newspaper office down principal 
street and to Colonial carrying ban- 
ners "Going to See Sherlock Holmes 
at Colonial" — "Meet Us at the Col- 
onial Tonight," the boys each brought 
a boy friend and all wore the Sherlock 
Holmes Masks. At a dance a man 
in charge announced "A Sherlock 
Holmes Special" and each dancer 
wore a mask with lights low, made big 
hit with young people; there were 
about 200 there. The above with cut- 
out lobby and shadow .light on same 
created much talk. 



Meadville, Pa. — Manager Chas. E. 
Schatz, the Park had only intended 
using the regular line of advertising 
which includes 24. 6, 3 and one sheet 
stands, heralds, window cards, lobby 
display, slides etc., but when Gold- 
wynner Bill Robson came along from 
Pittsburgh with his tales of what had 
been done on "Remembrance" they 
decided to go after this one. They 
made three distinct appeals; reach- 
ed the school pupils with a "Remem- 
brance" souvenir book mark, dis- 
tributed through the teachers to every 
grade and high school pupil in town; 
got into every store window in town; 
with an 11x14 card which read "Buy 
Your Christmas Remembrance here 
and be sure to see Remembrance 
Rupert Hughes big Goldwyn Picture 
at the Park Theater" with the play 
dales. Where the merchant demur- 
red he was told to cut the theater 
name and date off after the show was 
over and the top of the card would 
be a live one for him right up till 
Christmas. Tribune Republican 
agreed to sponsor a matinee for all 
n en over 60 years and in the stories 
brought <>nt the fart that we have 
all heard tic name of mother extolled 
♦ c the skies in song and story but 
s ■ Idom hear anything about father. 
And this is father's "Remembrance" 
Day ushering in "Remembrance" 
week- an-1 the holiday season is one 
of "Remembrance." 



Flood Scenes for "The Sin Flood" 

Through the efforts of H. T. Snow- 
den, Goldwynner, the Palace had a 
very unusual lobby display on "Thaj 
Sin Flood." Snowden secured a num> 
ber of exceptional photos of the In- 
dianapolis flood in 1913 and these 
along with stills from the picture 
were placed on a 7x4 compo board 
with captions reading: "Scenes from 
the Greatest Flood Indiana History, 
Indianapolis 1913." "Scenes From 
the Greatest Flood Picture in Motion 
Ficture History." "The Sin Flood." 
This display attracted an unusual 
amount of attention with the throngs 
of holiday shoppers. 



A Holiday Stunt 

Cleveland — Scovil Essex and Rief. 
managers of the Gorden Square pro- 
moted a real live publicity stunt for 
the week before Xmas by contracting 
with C. E. Holah of the Cleveland 
M. P. Co. for the production of 1,000 
feet of Movies to be made of their 
entire neighborhood including all 
School Kiddies, Hospitals, Churches, 
Holiday shoppers, etc. Holah's out- 
fit appeared on the streets in the 
vicinity of the theater with a real live 
Santa Claus and Cameramen in Avia- 
tors helmets and leather coats and 
with a large touring car with flaring 
banners on its side announcing where 
the motion pictures would be shown 
the following week. About everyone 
in the neighborhood tried to get in 
the picture with the result that three 
traffic cops had to handle some of 
the shots taken in order to let Santa 
escape with a whole skin. 

With the stunt the Gorden gave 
cash Christmas presents to certain 
people in the picture who identified 
themselves in a marking on the film. 



Some Good Ideas 

Faribault, Minn. — The Strand put 
over "The Sin Flood" assisted by 
Buddy Stuart, Goldwyn exploiteer this 
way: 

Had boy on street carrying um- 
brella seven days in advance of show- 
ing—reading in yellow "The Sin 
Flood is Coming." Run teaser adds 
in paper six days in advance — "The 
Flood Will Sweep You Away" — five 
days in advance — "The Sin Flood is 
Coming"— 4 days in a "Chief of Police 
What Do You Know About The Sin 
Flood"— "Mayor Will The Sin Flood 
Sweep Faribault" others along this 
line addressed to prominent and well 
known men about town. Used letters 
similar to teaser adds six davs in ad- 
vance 1.000 of them. Used stickers 
"Rush The Sin Flood Is Coming" 
and "See The Sin Flood" on all letters 
programs mailed out from theater also 
got tie-up with offices and stores to 
use stickers on letters and packages. 
Used lobby in red lights with red 
flood falling on big five foot black 
circle with letters The Sin Flood in 
Red in front. Result had everybody 
talking days before picture got here 
and went over with a bang. 



/ 



F. J. GODSOL 



Do You Want 

Success 

For 1923 

? 



Every Exhibitor 
Wants It 



tie brAdstreet 

of FILHDOM 







^recocmized 
Authority 




Vol. XXIII No. 2 



Wednesday, January 3, 1923 



Price 5 Cents 



Censorship 

Threatened in Missoui -Arbuckle 
Situation Aggravate! Con- 
ditions 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
St. Louis — An open drive for state 
censorship of moving pictures has 
been launched by the Missouri Sun- 
day School Asso., which embraces 
some 4.500 Sunday school superin- 
tendents in the state. Hays' order 
reinstating "Fatty" Arbuckle, has 
i precipitated the censorship drive, and 
well informed politicians and stu- 
dents of Missouri psychology frankly 
admit that the situation is grave, 
I; king the most optimistic view of the 
conditions that prevail. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



U 



Merton" In Pictures? 

Reported Glenn Hunter May Use It — 
1 Chaplin Reported Interested 

"Merton of the Movies" in which 
Glenn Hunter is appearing, and which 
ran as a serial in the Satevepost, is, 
according to reports, to be made into 
' a picture with Glenn Hunter appear- 
ing as Merton, the same part which 
he is presenting on the stage. 

No confirmation of the report is 
obtainable. 

A number of film folk have serious- 
ly considered "Merton" for picture . 
material. Some time ago it was said 
Charlie Chaplin was considering the 
play as material, but the price asked 
for picture rights is said to have 
blocked the idea. 




Hays Back 



Enthusiastic Over Outlook for Bet- 
ter Cooperation and Understand- 
ing for Los Angeles 
Confident that there will be a far 
better cooperation than has heretofore 
existed in Hollywood Will Hays re- 
turned to New York yesterday. 

This cooperation will come not 
only from the studio workers and 
employees numbering approximately 
15,000 and upward but will also be 
found forthcoming from businessmen 
and others with whom the picture 
people are constantly dealing. 

"I left Patten out there and O'Xeil 
will remain on the coast indefinitely" 
said Hays. "I feel that a great deal 
that was started during my visit to 
the coast last summer has now been 
definitely consummated and we are 
anticipating not only a better under- 
standing but a hetter working ar- 
rangement." 

(Continued on Page 2) 



One of the striking scenes from The Film Guild's great box-office pro- 
duction "Second Fiddle" starring Glenn Hunter— supported by Mary As- 
tor — a Hodkinson picture. — Advt. 



The Troubles of an 
Exhibitor 

Ouija, Ohio. 
Dear Film Daily — 

I just seed in the paper that you 
publish the troubles of exhibitors in 
your kolums. I think this is good 
idear, as we fellows should all hang 
together. Because then those big 
companyies like Lubin, Essanay, and 
sc forth, whose pictures I play would 
be brung closer to us. I own the 
Nicolodeon in my city, only I charge 
ten cents. It's right next door to 
Hennabery's Drug Store, the first 
road to your right as you get off the 
jitney in front of Jakes Notion Store, 
after you walk about one or two hun- 
dred feet. 

(Continued on page 3) 



Conklin Back 

F. G. Conklin has just returned 
from a trip covering Canada and the 
Middle-West, representing Hope 
Hampton Prod. 

Pioneer Bankruptcy Sale 
Office fixtures, furniture, etc., of 
Pioneer Film Co., bankrupt, will be 
auctioned next Monday, by order of 
the receiver. 



Use Bombs on Danz 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Seattle— A bomb explosion, which 
wrecked the limousine of John Danz, 
owner of four down town second run 
houses, is thought to have been in- 
tended to have killed Danz, who has 
been having labor troubles with the 
musicians' unions since last June. 

For some time, the practice of 
placing chemical bombs in the 
town theaters has been going on. 



Lynch in Town 

S. A. Lynch of the Southern Enter- 
prises, is in town. 

On Way Home 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Hollywood— F. J. Godsol of Gold- 
vvyn, has left for the East. 



New Capitol Record 
It was reported yesterday that the 
Capitol had established a new record 
with Neilan's, "The Stranger's Ban- 
quet." On Sunday the business total- 
ed $13,559.80, and on Monday, $10,- 
324.10, thus grossing almost $25,000 
foi the first two days of the week. 



Pola Negri in "The Cheat" 
Famous Players announced yester- 
day that Pola Negri is to be starred 
in "The Cheat" to be directed by 
George Fitzmaurice with Jack Holt 
to be featured and Charles De Roche 
in the company. Production will 
start about Jan. 22. 

Nearly eight years ago Cecil De 
Mille made "The Cheat" with Fanny- 
Ward and Sessue Hayakawa and it 
became one of the greatest box of- 
fice successes in the history of the 
business. 



Prod. Security Get "The Etast" 

Distribution rights to Thomas Dix- 
on's "The Beast," have been secured 
by Producers Security Corp. 

Roach in Town 

Hal Roach, producer of the Harold 
Lioyd and other comedies, is in town 
for a brief vacation, looking over 
shews and trying to find some lead- 
in u ladies. Headquarters at Pathe. 



National Plans Off 

Understood A. B. C. Will Not En- 
deavor At This Time to Form 
Booking Organization Across 
Country 

It is understood that the Associated 
Booking Corp., the A. B. C, has. 
for the time present, decided not to 
try to organize nationally. For the 
time being efforts will be concen- 
trated in developing the New York 
organization, and securing pictures. 

A number of obstacles apparently 
have developed, one of them being 
the possibility of becoming involved 
in local difficulties at such points 
where booking organizations are at 
present operating. 



Abe Warner Back From Coast 

Abe Warner arrived east yesterday 
after a three months' stay at the 
Warner's coast studios. According 
to Warner, Hollywood is humming 
with activity, there are few idle film 
folk, and this year threatens to be 
the biggest in the history of the in- 
dustry from a production standpoint. 

"One of the biggest and most 
satisfying things on the west coast 
today," said Warner, "is the making 
of fewer and better pictures. This is 
an actual fact." 

After spending about six weeks 
here Abe Warner will return to 
Hollywood to watch production for 
the coming season. 



Business Off 

Government Taxes Show November 
Not as Good as Last Year 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Washington — Admission taxes col- 
lected during the month of November 
amounted to $5,484,790, according to 
returns made to the Bureau of In- 
ternal Revenue. This was an in- 
crease of $88,000 over the collections 
for October, which were $5,396,461. 
but were $1,510,585 less than the 
$6,995,375 reported for November, 
1921. 



Betty Compson in Town 
Betty Compson who recently com- 
pleted "The White Flower" at the 
Lasky studio, has arrived in New 
York to do a little shopping. She 
will return to Hollywood Jan. 11 to 
start her next picture. 




Iti. HMl No. 2 Wednesday, Jan. 3, 1923 Price 5 Cents 

Copyright 1922, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
fILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor; 

/. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 

Mer ; J. A. Cron, Adrertisiog Manager. 

Jtntered as sec*s/|-class matter May 21, 1918, 

at the post office «t New York, N. Y., under 

the act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free) United States Outside 

sf Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 

Souths, $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 

•15.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 

Address all communications to THE FILM 

DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 

N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 

Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 

6411 Hollywood Blvd 'Phone, Hollywood 

1603. 

Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau, Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
vakfa), Wenielsplatz. 

Quotations 

High Low Close Sales 

East. Kod. 90)4 89^ 90% 2,000 
F. P.-L. ..93 91 % 92 3,000 

do pfd. .. 98 98 98 300 

G'w'yn 5 4^ 5 200 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's ... 19^ \9 l /i 19% 1,000 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 

"If Winter Comes" For Broadway 

Fox announced yesterday that "If 
Winter Comes" will be ready soon for 
a Broadway premiere. The produc- 
tion has been nearly a year in the 
making. 

i . — i 



rf (Sktzuxzticruz/ %tctuAJL^ 



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1482 Broadway 

New York 

We buy rights only for entire 

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BRYANT 78U 

WHEN YOU THINK OF 
I : FOREIGN THINK OF 

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THE 



■Z2H 



DAILV 



Wednesday, January 3, 1923 



, ■ AfK'U 



A Suggestion 

The Daily News, editorially 
suggests that Will Hays ar- 
range with Mary Pickford to 
appear as Juliet. 



Standing Back 

William Standing has returned 
from Europe on the Berengaria. 



"Knighthood" to the Rivoli 

"Knighthood" will be shown at the 
Rivoli next week. 



Oppose School Movies 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Milwaukee — Jack Silliman, of the 
M. P. T. O., says Milwaukee ex- 
hibitors feel that the growing tend- 
ency to show pictures in church and 
school is dangerous. They expect 
to make a more definite statement 
regarding this within a few weeks, 
when the investigating committees 
report. 



Kansas Insurance Idea 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
St. Louis — Frank L. Travis, retir- 
ing superintendent of insurance in 
Kansas, is one of the chief promoters 
in a mutual insurance company to be 
known as "The Theatre Mutual," 
which will write fire and explosion 
insurance for theaters, principally 
picture houses. Some of the Kansas 
exhibitors have complained that they 
cannot get the right sort of coverage 
for some of the business they want 
from the old line insurance com- 
panies, such as booth and films. The 
new company will write insurance 
on everything in the theater, charg- 
ing the field rates on lines now cov- 
ered by old line companies and 
special rates on the new lines. 



Hays Back 

(Continued from Page 1) 
With regard to the Arbuckle situa- 
tion Hays said that he had nothing 
to add to what has led to so much 
publicity excepting that "there has 
been a rather broad and general mis- 
understanding" of what he had in 
mind at the time that he removed his 
objection to Arbuckle working. 

"This does not mean, nor did it 
ever mean." said Hays, "that the Ar- 
buckle pictures were to be released— 
that is a matter which concerns the 
company distributing them. Nor did 
it mean that Arbuckle was to return 
to the screen as a star. It meant 
simply and briefly that Arbuckle was 
to be allowed a chance to earn a 
living. Those interested in his future 
can arrange that to their best satis- 
faction." 



Capital Increases 

Albany — Capital increases filed by 
New York picture corporations in- 
clude: 

New York Studios, Manhattan, 
$40,000 to $60,000. 

Universal Picture Corp., Manhat- 
tan, $1,000,000 to $7,000,000. 



ir 



TiilSBD 



MADE TO ORDER 



Commercial Developing and Printinc 



1339-5! DIVEP3EY PARKWAY - CHICAGO, U.S.A. ' 



CHAS. 0. BAUMANN, 



Pre*. 



RESOURCES - $5,000,000 
— LEGAL RATES — 



PRODUCERS & STARS 

represented. Also every form of 
financial service rendered in connec- 
tion therewith — at legal rates. 



GREAT.J NORTHERN FINANCE CORP. 

Knickerbocker Building 

Broadway at 42nd Street, N. Y. City 
Telephone Bryant 2989 



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7^e Story at the Box- Office 



Shadows (Lichtman) with Lon Cha- 
ney. — The star's masterpiece. Will live 
up to all exploitation you can give it. 
Played up "Ching Chong Chinaman." 
The Plaindealer and News boosted this 
as the best picture of the year. Only 
theatre in Cleveland that had standing 
room only on Monday all day. Opposi- 
tion When Knighthood Was in 
Flower and Wallace Reid in Thirty- 
Days. Capacity 4,400.— W. H. Raynor, 
Reade's Hippodrome, Cleveland, O. 

"What The Box-Office Did For Me."— 

yv . «i it Exhibitors Herald 

Distributed by 



Ms a Preferred Picture 



<=&> 



AL-LICHTMAN 

CORPORATIO N 



l650 BROADWAY | 



NEW YORK CITY 



THE 



Wednesday, January 3, 1923 




PatbeNews 

No. 2 

RUM SCHOONER WRECKED ON A 
BAR — British rum runner goes ashore on 
sandbar off Montauk Point, L. I., and 3,000 
cases of whiskey go to the fishes. 
SNOWSLIDE BURIES TRAIN— Smoke- 
stack alone visible when snowslide covers 
train in Winnipeg. 

STROMBOLI AFLAME WITH NEW 
ERUPTION— Italian volcano belches lava, 
burying village. 

NIAGARA FALLS IN WINTER— FROM 
THE AIR — Remarkable scenes of mighty 
cataract in winter robes. 

Other news as usual. 

THE ONLY ONE-REEL FEATURE 

today 



Milwaukee Deals 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
M i 1 w a u k e e — Joseph Schwartz, 
pioneer Milwaukee exhibitor, an- 
nounced the sale of his three picture 
houses, the Liberty, Kosciousko and 
Riviera, for a sum approximating 
$300,000. Schwartz is leaving for 
Europe. The Liberty has been 
bought by Henry Wehr; the Kos- 
ciousko and Riviera will be operated 
by Nat Cohn and associates, owners 
of the Fern and State. 



Some Sign 



Nazimova's "Salome" sign in 
front of the Criterion is attract- 
ing unusual attention. Some 
say it is a far better eye getter 
than the big board which was 
originally built for "Knight- 
hood." The sign is illuminated 
at night with red incandescents 
and the glare can be seen for 
several blocks. 



The Troubles of an 
Exhibitor 

(Continued from Page 1) 

I got competition from a low life 
who owns the Elite, so I wanted to 
run something special. So a sales- 
man from some company (I lost the 
card) said I should always have a 
filler in on my program and he would 
fix me up. I asked him what a filler 
in was, and he told me it was some- 
thing between the feature and the 
komedy to fill out the program and 
give the audience a rest between the 
tears and the laughs, altho I forgot to 
tell him that some of the features 
made the audience laugh. He said he 
had an old print at the hotel that i 
could have for $25 and sell again to 
other exhibitors in Pneumonia, Alleup 
and the others and still put over a 
scoop on the Elite. 

So I figured I could give four 
shows at night and make up some of 
the money. The name of it was 
"Medinah." So I run my show and 
all I could get out of it was one and 



Censorship 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Although it was generally under- 
stood that the Committee of Fifty 
intended to reintroduce the censor- 
ship bill that was defeated at the 
last session of the legislature, men 
in the know said there was very little 
chance for the measure, but things 
look different today. Arbuckle's case 
has given the reformers a live topic, 
and they are utilizing it to the utmost. 
The Women's Chamber of Com- 
merce in St. Louis, an organization 
representing many thousand business 
women, has officially condemned 
Hays' action, and has called a mass 
meeting of all women's organizations 
of the city for Wednesday, January 
3, to take further action in the matter. 

Glucksmann Moves 

The New York offices of Max 
Glucksmann have been moved from 
the Candler Bldg., to 145 W. 45th 
St. 



George F. Hernandez Dead 

(Special to 1 BE I ELM DAILY) 

Hollywood — George F. Hernandez, 

veteran actor of stage and Bcreen, 

d;ed in a hospital at Glendale. He 

59. 



one-half shows. "Medinah" wasn't a 
filler in. It was a filler up. And be- 
sides it was a foreigners picture. So 
I lost the $25 and two and a half 
shows. The print was very bad, but 
I think with a little fixing up this 
could play as a regular feature, if 
they took out the News weekly parts, 
especially the volcano, because we 
ain't got none in this country. Just 
the same I wish you could keep them 
salesmen off the road. Will write 
you again soon. 

Yours for the good of the business. 

ABE SMART. 



EXPERIENCED 
Theatre Manager 

now managing a representative 

house 
Desires To Change Connections 

Thoroughly efficient in exploita- 
tion and presentation work. 
Qualified to furnish highest 
references 

Address 
B-969, c/o The Film Daily 



ART TITLES 

LOUIS MEYER 

Craftsmen Film Lab. 

251 West 19th St. 

Watldni 7260-7461 



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Through our revolutionizing procsss 
we give you, choice of 10 high class 
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TITLEGRAPH STUDIOS 

203 West 49th St. Circle 10.056 

Laboratory Wad. 3443 



m 



1THE SUPER 39 

BETTY COMPSON 



"The White Flower 

Written and directed by Julia Crawford Ivers 

Released March 5th . 



>> 




A ROMANCE of Hawaii, full of mystery 
and strange adventure. Miss Compson 
has the role of a girl who is half Hawaiian, 
half American. Her struggle between her 
conflicting selves makes the role rich in 
emotional power. 

In order to have the atmosphere correct, 



the entire company went to Hawaii, where 
all the scenes were taken. So for the first 
time the real Hawaii will be seen on the 
screen. 

The supporting cast includes Edmund 
Lowe, Arline Pretty, Edward Martindell and 
Leon Barry. 






No. 2 "Dark Secrets." 

No. 3 "My American Wife." 

No. 4 "Drums of Fate." 




'A FAMO US PLAYE RS LIS KY CORPORATION J^Jfi 

IJI AOOLOH ZUKOH 0..„„-< l»r**^ 



No. 5 "Nobody's Money." 
No. 6 "Adam's Rib." 
No. 7 "Java Head." 



ja 



(X paramount Qiclure 



WATCH THIS 

SPACE 

TOMORROW 

FOR 

No. 9 



THE 



&&^ 



DAILV 



Wednesday, January 3, 1923 



In the Courts 

In the suit of James K. Polk against 
the U. S. Moving Picture Co., Su- 
preme Court Justice Gavegan has 
vacated the attachment on an agree- 
ment between the parties that the 
Lee-Bradford Company will pay 
$1,416 out of the funds attached to 
the plaintiff, and the balance to the 
defendant. 



Supreme Court Justice Gavegan 
signed an order discontinuing the suit 
of Benjamin P. Schulberg against 
United Artists upon the application 
by O'Brien, Malevinsky & Driscoll, 
attorneys for the defendants, who said 
the suit had been compromised and 
settled. 



Berinstein's Fifth 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Albany — Manager George W. Rob- 
erts, representing William Berinstein, 
announces the purchase by Berinstein, 
of the Palace at Troy, seating 1.000. 

This is Berinstein's fifth theater, 
he owns the Hudson and Colonial in 
this city. The Majestic and Mozart 
in Elmiria, and has one under con- 
struction in Little Falls. 



WANTED 

Gentleman of Personality and 
refined appearance, who is 
qualified to act as advertising 
and publicity manager for 
State Rights Producer and Dis- 
tributor. A man who fits our 
requirements must also possess 
salesmanship ability and be will- 
ing to work hard and earnestly. 
Write stating age, experience 
and salary expected. Give re- 
ferences. Address B-089, c/o 
The Film Daily. 



YOUR PROGRAM NEEDS 

PRIZMA 

COLOR 

1? 

Nearly 100 subjects avail- 
able for art settings — at- 
mosphere prologues, mus- 
ical introductions — effects. 

The only regular short sub- 
ject service in the world 
using Color Photography 
exclusively! 

See the Prizma distributor 

in your territory or write 

us direct. 

PRIZMA, INCORPORATED 

110 W. 40 St. New York 



Newspaper Opinions 

"Salome"— United Artists 
Criterion 

HERALD — Indeed, "Salome" is distinctly 
erudite entertainment. It falls into no group 
of classification that has hitherto been 
established in the world of the silent drama, 
which means that it contains no trace of 
that shopworn hokum which seems to be so 
essential a part of box office value. It is 
beautiful — extraordinarily so — but it is not 
beautiful in a conventional way. It is, in 
fact, startlingly different from anything that 
we have ever seen, on the screen or off. 

TRIBUNE— It is a series of beautiful 
pictures, and Natacha Rambova has suc- 
ceeded in making even the actors themselves 
look not like the sort of human beings we 
see around us, but lilce Beardsley drawings. 
Our advice is, do not miss "Salome" what- 
ever you do. It is beautiful and fascinating. 

NEW S — We liked it enormously. 
Whether you will is another question. We 
say this because many of our friends, whose 
intelligence and opinion we respect, differ 
with us. We would not dream of saying 
to you, "Go to see 'Salome,' it is a picture 
you will like I" We do not know whether 
you would or not. But if you do wish to 
see a really significant cinedrama, then 
"Salome" may well be your object lesson. 

WORLD — Of all the bizarre costumery 
and background settings which we have seen 
in pictures, "Salome's" are the bizarrest. 
Everything done up and acted in front of 
gorgeous draperies and fantastic curtains. 
From the beginning to the end of the pic- 
ture there are fitting views of symbolic de- 
sign, some of them in color, which are 
extremely beautiful, and the close-up scenes 
oi the little actress are smartly done as to 
photography, lighting and posing. Nazimova 
is a magnetic and interesting figure through- 
out. 

TIMES — It is different but does not de- 
pend upon mere difference for its attraction. 
The eye looks upon it and finds it good. 
Consistently fantastic, making no effort at 
literalism in investiture, the picture appeals 
at once as a work of free imagination. 
There remains the story itself, and it is dis- 
r. pointing. It runs out in an anti-climax. 

GLOBE— Oscar Wilde's biblical drama, 
which has had such an unhappy time of it 
on the spoken stage, comes to the screen 
with every stamp of being a success. 
Throughout the picture is pitched upon the 
plane of the fantastic and grotesque. None 
of it seems at all human, and if "Robin 
Hood" is a "moving tapestry," as some 
one briefly put it, "Salome" is an intricate 
pattern come to life. 

MAIL — Nazimova portrays a chaste, ice- 
like and passionless Salome. Even while she 
tempts Jokanaan, the prophet, she gives the 
impression that she is moved more by 
curiosity to see the prophet betray some 
human weakness than by first love. Nor 
does she exhibit enough feeling in professing 
her love for Jokanaan after he has been 
beheaded to make the scene altogether con- 
vincing. 

EVE. WORLD — We thoroughly agree 
with the verdict of the Committee on Ex- 
ceptional Photoplays of the National Board 
of Review, viz. : that Nazimova's screen ver- 
sion of "Salome" is well worth waiting for. 

TELEGRAM— The most unusual picture 
of the present season. 

SUN — Of course, the success of the pic- 
ture rests on the piriuant charm of Nazimova 
herself. In fantastic head dresses and very 
brief costumes she plays the role of the pas 
sionate princess with studied consciousness 






"Sure Fire Flint" — Mastodon 
Cameo 

WORLD — With its ample supply of 
"action" views and its "names," "Sure Fire 
Flint" ought to go well in the film houses 
throughout the country. 

TRIBUNE— "Sure Fire Flint" is the best 
thing Mr. Hines has done. It is amazing, 
that man's versatility ! He can dance, and 
how he can play pool ! Then there are 
motor races and train wrecks, and heroines 
locked in safes, and all the time a mystery, 
which starts in the first reel, and which you 
forget all abount until it is solved in the 
last reel. In justice to "Sure Fire Flint" 
we wish to say that it has a better plot 
than nine-tenths of the photodramas one 
sees. 

WORLD — There's one thing mighty cer- 
tain, and that is that his latest picture will 
make for John a lot of friends. It's good 
picture entertainment. 



CARL LAEMMLE 



Do You Want 

Success 

For 1923 

? 






Every Exhibitor 
Wants It 



7Ao brAdstreet 

of FILMDOM 




^recogmizeb 
Authority 



vol. XXIII No. 3 



Thursday, January 4, 1923 



Price 5 Cents 



New Contract 

As Planned by Actors Equity — Some 
of the Terms— No Strike Con- 
templated 

The council of the Actors Equity 
Association has appointed a special 
committee to draw up the proposed 
standard contract for motion picture 
actors in the East, guided by the 
proposed standard form received 
Tuesday from Los Angeles. The 
main feature of this, is a provision 
that a standard week's work shall 
consist of 48 hours. 

Other provisions follow: 

An agreement as to the minimum 
length of time of the actors employ- 
ment shall be arrived at prior to each 
engagement. 

Actors shall agree to return to 
work for retakes or additional scenes 
after the completion of the picture 
al the same salary provided they arc 
not otherwise employed. 

(Continued on Page 5) 



A 

T and 



Smith for Repeal 

Of Censorship Act — Believes Act 

Was a Step From 

Constitution 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Albany — Governor Smith, in his 
annual message to the Legislature 
will recommend the repeal of the law 
creating the State Motion Picture 
Regulating Commission. Governor 
Smith comments upon the subject 
a? follows: 

"Censorship is not in keeping with 
our ideas of liberty and of freedom 
of worship or freedom of speech. 
* * * I believe that the enactment 
of a statute providing for censorship 
of the moving pictures was a step 
away from that liberty which the 
Constitution guaranteed and it should 
bt repealed." 



Big Deal On 



Famous Players Reported Taking Over Entire Lynch Holdings 

in South — Exchanges as Well as Theaters — Lynch 

to Retire From Picture Field 



Grainger Off On Trip 

James R. Grainger, Vice President 
and General Sales Manager of 
Goldwyn, left New York yesterday 
for an extended tour of the country, 
during which he will visit the 27 
Goldwyn Exchanges. 

Grainger is delighted over the suc- 
cess of the pictures released by 
Goldwyn for the first months of the 
season. "Conditions in all parts of 
the country are looking up," he said, 
"and 1923 will be a good year. All 
we need is confidence and good pic- 
tures." 

"It is not apparent that there is 
a particular demand for any special 
type of picture. Reports that I have 
been receiving indicate that ex- 
hibitors are depending less on famous 
names and more on good, sound, 
well produced stories. This is a 
healthy condition and gives producers 
iust the incentive they need to turn 
out pictures that will win on their 
own merits." 



McConnell to Coast 
Fred McConnell, serial manager 
for Universal, left for the Coast on 
Tuesday. 



Natural Market 

Of State Right Field the Neighbor- 
hood House, Says Producers 
Security 

The result of a nation-wide survey 
made by Producers Security Corp. 
covering the state-right market indi- 
cates conclusively to the officials of 
that company that the outlook for 
1923 for the independent distributor is 
very good, but that to cash in on his 
possibilities he must have real box- 
office values to mix in with his regular 
program stock, and that likewise it 
is just as important to have a line 
of program pictures as a few big 
box-office values. 

(Continued on page 3) 



Hawley In Vita Picture 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Hollywood — Wanda Hawley has 

been signed by Vitagraph for one of 

the leading roles in "Masters of 

Men." 



It is reported that an important deal is under way between 
Famous Players and S. A. Lynch. As the story goes, it" the deal 
is completed as outlined, it will mean the retirement of Stephen 
A. Lynch from motion pictures. 

Under the plan outlined Famous Players will take over the 

exchanges now operated in the South by Lynch and Lynch will 

release Famous from the contract now in effect with Southern 

Enterprises by which the Lynch organization will be removed 

from all identity with Southern Enterprises and various allied 

corporations which are at present operating the so-called "Lynch 

string" in the South. 

According to reports if the deal is 

closed it will mean that Lynch will re- 
tire from motion pictures. 



Baker Preparing Scenario 
David Selznick announces that 
George D. Baker is now working 
ov. the script of "The Easiest Way." 
foi which Ferdinand Earle is to direct 
Theda Bara. 





: %~""-f~ : 



"Sure Fire Flint"— serves chiefly to amuse those who have had a 
afternoon watching other moving pi ctures— Evening Sun, ruesday.— 
Advt. 




Importance of Move 
Probably no move within the in- 
dustry holds as much interest as the 
probability of a deal between Fa- 
mous Players and Lynch. 

Some years ago. when Lynch left 
New York to undertake the distribu- 
tion of Famous Players in the South 
he immediately demanded instantan- 
eous recognition "by securing theaters 
all over his territory. He became 
rot only an important factor in the 
distribution of Famous Players and 
other product but within a brief pe- 
riod became the most active buyer 
of theater properties in this country. 
So much so, that eventually South- 
ern Enterprises was formed, and 
while Famous Players was practically 
the owner of this corporation the 
Lynch organization through a con- 
tract operated these properties on a 
percentage basis of the gross. 

The Lynch plans were of such an 
(Continued on Page I) 



Stoll Dividends 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY 1 ) 

London— The Stoll Film Co.. Ltd., 
for the year ending Oct. 31. reports 
a profit of over £36,076, and the 
directors recommended a dividend of 
5 per cent. A final dividend on the 
ordinary shares of the Stoll Picture 
Theater, Kingsway, at the rate of 
15 per cent per annum for the half 
year ending Nov. 3, VU2. was also 
declared, which with the interim divi- 
dend, will amount to 12 1 /. per cent 
for the year. 



THE 



i£&*k 



^w 



DAILY 



Thursday, January 4, 1923 




V ol. XXIII ho. 3 Thur sday, Jan. 4. I9J Price 5 Cents 

Uopynght 1922, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
riLK FOLKS, INC. 

fosewa Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 
(. W. Allooate, Treasurer and Business Man 
»ger; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as »eoo -t-class matter May 21, 1918, 
it the post office it New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 

»f Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 

mjOBtaa, $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 

US- 00. Subscribers should remit with order 

Vddress all communications to THE FILM 

DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 

N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderhilt 4551-4552-5538 

Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 

6411 Hollywood Blvd 'Phone, Hollywood 

1603. 

Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative — Le Film. 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Ceatral European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau, Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
▼*kia), Wenzelsplatz. 



Quotations 

High Low Close Sales 

East. Kod. 90 & 89-K 9034 2,000 

F. P.-L. ..93 91 ^ 92 3,00' 

do pfd. .. 98 98 98 3d 

^G'wyn .... 5 4^ 5 200 



Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's ... 195*6.19^ 19^ 1,000 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 



Incorporations 

Wilmington — Marion Motion Pic- 
ture Corp. $20,000. (Colonial Char- 
ter Co.) 



Building Matinees 

Torrington, Conn. — The 
Palace has found a solution for 
dull matinees. The larger of 
the town's two dailies co- 
operated to print this coupon 
every Thursday morning on the 
front page: 

Bring This Coupon and 
Five Cents And it Will 
Admit You to the Special 
School Children's Matinee 
at the Palace Theater To- 
day Between 4 and 6 P. M. 

The exhibitor is working 
the stunt up to the point where 
he can include the name of the 
picture in the coupon. 

The paper was glad to run 
this as a permanent feature, for 
the circulation value has been 
found great. The matinee has 
only been tried once so far, for 
"On the High Seas," and the 
receipts were way in excess of 
the average. 



Neilan's Next 
r(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
g r Hollywood — Marshall Neilan's sec- 
q ond production with Goldwyn will be 
"The Ingrate," written by Neilan and 
adapted by Carey Wilson. 



More Hodkinson Bookings 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Chicago — Lubiner & Trintz circuit 
las booked the entire series of 
thirteen "All Star" comedies, dis- 
tributed through Hodkinson. 



Hartford, Conn. — Norwich Palace 
Theater Corp., Norwich. Capital, 
$150,000. 



Wilmington— J. Parker Read, Jr., 
Productions, Manhattan, motion pic- 
ture negatives, $5,000; I. Kaplan, P. 
Cohen, J. P. Read Jr. (Attorney, M. 
L. Lesser, 366 Madison Ave.) 



Albany — New companies entering 
the motion picture business were in- 
corporated here the past week as 
follows: Pelem Productions Inc., 
($20,000); Big Pictures, Inc. ($150,- 
000); The Blackmailers, Inc., ($10,- 
000) ; Animated Miniature Theater 
Corporation ($300,000); M. & H. 
Corporation, ($8,000) ; Russo-Ameri- 
can Cinema Exchange Corporation, 
($100 000). 



(f (QcLtuzatlcrrval. <lctuAju-' 




For One Hundred Dollars 

A portable projector, motor 
driven with water cooling 
system and brand new. Just 
a few left. 

Ruby Camera Exchange 
727 Seventh Ave., N. Y. 



Coast Brevities 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Hollywood — Catherine Bennett, 
sister to Enid, will appear in "When 
Knights Were Cold," the next Amal- 
gamated comedy for Metro starring 
Stan Laurel. Mae Laurel, William 
Armstrong, Stanhope Wheatcroft, 
William Bevis, Harry Dcmore and 
"Scotty" MacGregor will be in the 
cast. 



Rupert Hughes has taktn 100 play- 
ers to the desert to make some ex- 
teriors for "Souls for Sale." 



Mr. & Mrs. Carter De Haven have 
finished work on "Baby Ben" at the 
R-C studios. 



Huntley Gordon has been signed 
for a leading part in "Your Friend 
and Mine." 



Billy Armstrong is appearing in 
support of Stanley Laurel in "When 
Knights Were Cold." 



Carl H. Schillinger, formerly film 
editor with William S. Hart, is edit- 
ing "Michael O'Halloran." 



Johnnie Walker has purchased 
screen rights to H. C. Witwer's, "The 
Fourth Musketeer," which appeared 
in Cosmopolitan. 



Future Universal-Jewel productions 
duected by Hobart Henley will be 
known as "Hobart Henley produc- 
tions." 

H. E. GAUSMAN. 



Big Deal On 

'Continued from Page 11 

ambitious nature that at one time 
it appeared as though his idea might 
be carried out in other sections of 
the country, and the activities of 
some of his employees were capi- 
talized by the M. P. T. O. A. several 
years ago when the claim of "trust 
control" and domination was used by 
leaders of the exhibitor organization 
as a battle cry around which exhib- 
itors rallied. This resulted in a heat- 
ed argument between Lynch and 
Sydney S. Cohen in Atlantic City. 
Lynch an Unusual Figure 
There are few men in the industry 
who have as marked a personality as 
S. A. Lynch. Down South he is call- 
ed "a born trader." He is only about 
28 and within a decade has amassed 
■a fortune running into millions. In 
his early days he was a baseball play- 
er and started by trading a plot of 
ground in Ashevillc, N. C. From 
then on his success has been marked. 
Only recently he acquired control of 
a patent medicine corporation which 
handles "Tanlac" and it is expected 
that he will devote the greater part 
of his time to this. He owns news- 
papers, motor agencies, and real es- 
tate throughout the South. His 
home is in Atlanta, Ga. 



Operators and Owners Confer 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Chicago — Conferences are in pro- 
gress here between representatives of 
the Motion Picture Operator's Union 
and Motion Picture Theater Owners 
for the framing of a new working con- 
tract. The present one expires Jan. 
10. 



Charlotte Managers Elect 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Charlotte, N. C. — At the quarterly 
election of the Charlotte Film Ex- 
change Manager's Asso., the follow- 
ing officers were elected. H. H. 
Everett. Educational, chairman; E. 
E. Helier, Pathe, vice-chairman; E. 
F Dardine, Universal, secretary. 



New Screen Reduces Strain 

An improved screen is said virtu- 
ally to eliminate eye strain and render 
the projected picture as clearly visible 
from a position at one side of the 
house as from a seat directly in front 
of the screen, says Popular Mech- 
anics. 

It is made of a fabric to which is 
given a pure white surface embossed 
.with a multitude of small squares. 



Jones Optimistic 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Chicago— Aaron J. Jones of Jones, 
Linnick & Schaefer, says: '/At last 
the sun of prosperity is peeping over 
the horizon of the period of discontent 
and chill for the theatrical industry in 
general. The patient has passed the 
crisis and is on the fair road to re- 
covery. The past three years have 
been a veritable slough of despond, 
but the bright rays of approaching 
prosperity will dry up all signs of 
worry and dejection, and the year of 
1923, without doubt, will be the great- 
est normal theatrical year since the 
balmy davs before the nations of the 
world were steeped in the recent war." 



Kansas City Changes 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Kansas City, Kansas — L. A. Wal- 
lace has purchased the Bancroft from 
W. L. McDowell and Robert Rhodes 
has leased the Gilham to the Gilham 
Amusement Co. The Empress has 
been leased by Richards & Flynn, for 
the presentation of "Where Is My 
Wandering Boy Tonight?" 



Now Ready For 

The Independent Market 

MARIE DORO 



in 



"Sister Against Sister" 

Personally Directed By 

HERBERT BRENON 

Produced By 

Unity Pictures, Inc. 
Lee-Bradford Corp. 



701-7th Ave. 



New York 



CHAS. 0. BAUMANN, 



Pres 



RESOURCES - $5,000,000 
— LEGAL RATES - 



PRODUCERS & STA«<S 

represented. Also every foim <v 
financial service rendered in connci 
tion therewith — at legal rat»*s. 



GREAT: NORTHERN FINANCE CORP 

Knickerbocker Building 

Broadway at 42nd Street. N. Y City 
Telephone Bryant 2989 



EXPERIENCED 
Theatre Manager 

now managing a representative 

house 
Desires To Change Connections 

Thoroughly efficient in exploita- 
tion and presentation work. 
Qualified to furnish highest 
references 

Address 
B-969, c/o The Film Daily 



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THE 



Thursday, January 4, 1923 




New Theaters 

Pittsburgh — Steel City Amusement 
Co., has plans for a theater costing 
$150,000 at Center and Montross Sts. 



San Pedro, Cal. — A building permit 
has been issued for a house to be 
erected at 7th and Palos Verdes St. 
by Mrs. De Dodson to cost $240,000. 



Watervliet, N. Y.— The Hudson 
has been opened here by Elmer 
Crowninshield. 



San Francisco — Alfred S. Kirske, 
publicity man of Seattle and San 
Francisco, has been appointed house 
manager of the New Portola Theater. 



Asheboro, N. C— J. F. White, Jr., 
formerly with the Arnold B. Huff 
enterprises, High Point, N. C, has 
opened here. 



"Knighthood" Figures 
During the run of "Knighthood," 
at the Criterion, 122,086 persons paid 
$157,900.90 during the run of 15 
weeks and three days. "Humor- 
e.'-que" formerly held the record with 
$148,000 for 12 weeks. 



Buffalo House Closed 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Buffalo — The Criterion has just 
closed. Pictures had been shown on 
Sunday by Harry Marsey of the 
Niagara Pictures Corp. and Sol 
Myers, the manager. 



Tying Up Reading 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Reading— Carr & Schad have se- 
cured the Lyric from the Reading 
Amusement Co. This practically 
gives them control of Reading, ex- 
cept for the several houses operated 
here by Wilmer & Vincent. 



Kansas City, Mo. — The Star 
Amusement Co. has completed plans 
for the construction of a $125,000 
house here. 



Chicago — J. E. O. Pridmore has 
plans for a five-story building housing 
stores, hotel, dance-hall and a theater 
at Lawrence and Winthrop Aves. to 
cost $1,500,000. 



Paterson, N. J.— F. W. Wentworth 
has plans for a one-story theater, 
costing $150,000 at Church and Mar- 
ket Sts. for the Alexander Hamilton 
Theater Corp. 



Increase Capital 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

St. Louis — The Southern Real 
Estate and Financial Co., controlled 
by Frank Tate and Charley Cella, 
owners of several St. Louis theaters, 
lias increased its capital from $1,000,- 
000 to $1,450,000. Its assets total 
$3,279,469 and liabilities but $1,824.- 
824. The Columbia Theater Com- 
pany, owned by the same interests, 
increased its capital from $200,000 to 
$300,000, listing assets of $430,436 and 
liabilities of $86,751. 

Another Tate-Cella subsidiary com- 
pany increased its capital stock 
as follows: Midcity Realty Company 
from $100,000 to $200,000. Assets 
$249,228 and liabilities of but $9,612. 



Natural Market 

(Continued from Page 1) 

The survey includes the follow ing: 
"M is evident that in the scramble 
for pictures of a larger size the neces- 
sity of the small town exhibitor and 
the neighborhood house, who musl 
put on a daily change, might he <• 
looked. The natural market of the 
state-right exhibitor naturally is tin- 
neighborhood house and other house. 
running from four to six changes per 
week. Most of the first-run accounts 
are so locked in with the national dis- 
tributing organizations that it is only 
occasionally that an independent dis- 
tributor, operating under state-rights 
can put his picture in for a first-run 
He must therefore look to the smaller 
houses for his revenue, and if he ex- 
pects those houses to stay in business 
and to pay him the kind of prices he 
must have for the more important 
pictures, it is the belief of Producers 
Security officials that the state-right 
man must make it his business to have 
enough pictures on hand of the pro- 
gram size to take care of the demand 
and to furnish very good entertain- 
ment at a fair price. 

"Never before has the state-right 
distributor had such a splendid oppor- 
tunity to make himself the real asso- 
ciate of the independent exhibitor in 
his field." 



Albers Resigns 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Chicago — Mort Henock is covering 
the west side territory for Universal 
in place of Reggie Albers, resigned. 



Get Pantheon Receipts 
$18,000 irried fn 



THERE IS NO TIME 
LIKE THE PRESENT 

We flatter ourselves that at 
some time or other you have 
given our little messages a 
cursory glance — or perhaps 
even thought you would look 
us over some time. Why not 
make a "how-do-you-do" call, 
say, tomorrow? A visit in- 
volves no obligations. 

CHROMOS TRADING CO. 

Financing for Film Enterprises 
1123 Broadway 



Suite 616 



'Phone Cbeljta 8284 



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we give you, choice of 10 high class 
hand lettered alphabets. The highest 
class illustrations. 24 hour s rvice 

TITLEGRAPH STUDIOS 

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$5000.00 REWARD 

To any man or woman in the United States, over the age of 16 years, and un- 
derstanding the English language who has not read or heard of 

NICK CARTER 

whose famous mystery detective stories appear in 1082 published volumes. 

The man who wrote these adventures produced no other type of fiction and 
knew more about writing detective stories than any other single person, living or dead. 
. Of this vast material we have chosen 12 of the most powerful stories and packed 
them into a new series of twelve productions of two reels each for distribution through 
State Right Exchanges who know the value of exploitation and what constitutes a real 
big attraction. 

Write for a press book or for a screening and if your territory is not already 
sold we will comply with your request. 

Keep your eyes opened for our announcement of twelve feature releases for 
1923. Regardless of the condition of your business, the opportunity we will offer 
State Right Exchanges must bring their organization to a profitable basis. 

INDEPENDENT PICTURES CORPORATION 

JESSE J. GOLDBURG, President 
1540 BROADWAY Phone Bryant 3993 



INDEPENDENT 
. PICTURES .' 





Raymond IvHtee 




mt^ 0M m s 



Featuring the greatest array 

of comedy talent ever 
gathered together in one unit. 



Highly Praised by Experts. 

"In these All-Star Comedies, directed by 
Gregory La Cava, the three attractive comedi- 
ans are unusually good. The new combination 
of actors is a pleasing one which should be most 
successful." — The Morning Telegraph. 

"It is chockf ul of funny situations, is well photo- 
graphed and you can safely advertise it as some- 
thing good in the comedy line. It won't disap- 
point." — Exhibitor's Herald. 

"Swift action, clever stunts and an O'Henry- 
esque twist at the end, pull this comedy up con- 
siderably and produce laughs." — Film Daily. 

"They contain a lot of sure-fire material which 
will bring laughs. There are many humorous 
situations. Charlie Murray has the sort of roles 
in which he gained a reputation." — Moving Pic- 
ture World. 

"Better than the average," "Considerable 
humorous material," "Yields good laughs, and 
one or two hair-raising stunts" some of the other 
critics wrote. 

Produced by 

MASTODON FILMS Inc., 

C. C. Burr, Pres. 

133-135-137 West 44th St., New York 

Distributed through the W. W. Hodkinson Corporation 

527 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. 








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THE 



Thursday, January 4, 1923 







Newspaper Opinions 

"My American Wife"— F. P.-L. 
Rivoli 

AMERICAN— Good story. 

TRIBUNE— "My American Wife" is an- 
other one of those elaborate films which 
always surround Miss Swanson — perhaps not 
as elaborate as a DeMille Picture, but 
plenty elaborate for all that. And Sam 
Wood brought a real horse on in the ban- 
queting scene. Something that, we believe, 
Mr. DeMille has not yet thought of. 

SUN — One of Miss Swanson's best pic- 
tures, for she is more restrained than usual, 
and is not in her familiar role of vamping 
her way to success against the discouraging 
attitude of numerous leering cavaliers who 
hold she is no better than a pretty lady, 
and to be treated as such. 

TELEGRAM— "My American Wife" is a 
beautiful production laid in the Argentines. 

MAIL — Will please people who like 
stories about so-called high society, horse 
racing and life in South America. It will 
also please those who like Gloria Swanson. 
How large a proportion of the population 
has any or all of these tastes can be de- 
termined only by the future success of the 
nature. 

"The Strangers Banquet" — Goldwyn 
Capitol 

WORLD — The picture really hangs upon 
a conflict between labor and capitol, with 
several love stories embroidered on the social 
fabric. The story is rather difficult to fol- 
low if one is seeking plot effects, but the 
beauty of the photography makes it accept- 
able to the eye at all times. 

TIMES — Neilan has a knack for spirited 
narration ; he selects good casts, as a rule, 
and gets the most out of the people who 
play for him, and, when he avoids the ex- 
cesses to which he is sometimes tempted, he 
can make moving pictures mean more and 
mean it quicker than almost any nine out 
of ten directors you can name. But he 
doesn't stick to his story. 

AMERICAN — It contains what many pic- 
tures lack — a dramatic opening. The picture 
moves swiftly, with few reminiscent cut-ins. 



NEWS — This photoplay certainly belongs 
on your holiday film shopping list. It is 
novel, it is interesting from the opening 
scene to the last, it presents for your ap- 
proval the 1923 type of motion picture hero, 
it is full, of human beings ; in short it is 
a Neilan picture. 

TRIBUNE — This picture does not seem 
like a Marshal Neilan production. It lacks 
humor, and we do not mean by that comedy 
There is a vast difference. But it is interest- 
ing if familiar and has in the cast a most 
wonderful collection of stars. Some of them 
have such small parts that Mr. Neilan 
seems almost prodigal in his casting. 

HERALD — Neilan knows a great deal 
about motion pictures. When he wants to 
he can be more forcibly expressive than any 
dor in the business. He can put over 
ideas with a terrific punch, and do it in 
a way that is essentially his own. But he 
is frightfully inconsistent. 

SUN — 'Indeed a feast for the eye, but it 
occasionally suffers from the unevenness that 
comes with a multitude of courses. The 
hors d'oeuvres are sple'udid, but toward the 
end the entree goes a bit flat, and the 
dessert is somewhat insipid. The climax of 
Marshall Neilan's latest picture, one might 
say, lacks the consistent robustness of ham 
eggs. 

TELEGRAM— The finest thing to the 
credit of this gifted young director. 

The story is a thrilling and dramatic 
romance laid amid the busy yards of a great 
shipbuilding concern. 

EVE. WORLD— This is Neilan's first 
production under the leonine banner of 
Goldwyn, and he has done both himself and 
his new associates proud in turning out what 
we think is one of his best. 

MAIL — Almost epic in its proportions. 
The chief fault with so many pictures nowa- 
days is a thin story padded to make a five 
or six reel picture. Here the handicap lies 
in the other direction. There is material 
enough for half a dozen plays. 

GLOBE — It has been said that with the 
single exception of D. W. Griffith the only 
director whose name has any drawing power 
at the box-office is Marshall Neilan, Why 
this condition exists is made plainly evident 
by a viewing of "The Strangers' Banquet." 
In so far as actual direction of separate 
scenes is concerned this picture is as nearly 
perfect as any ever shown on Broadway. 



Northwest Notes 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Butte, Mont. — The Ansonia 
Amuse Co. will show pictures in the 
Broadway, a legitimate house. 



Seattle — R. C. Montgomery has re- 
signed from the local F. B. O. staff 
W. E. (Bill) Bonham will travel out 
of the Seattle office. 



Metro reports confirmation of the 
loss of "Hard Luck" and "Burning 
Daylight" in the Astoria fire. They 
were booked at the Columbia. 



Arrow in Seattle, will have the 
Northwest distribution of the Wo- 
man's Home Companion films which 
are to be released day and date with 
the publication of the magazine. 



Spokane — A. J. Bischell, of the 
Rex, has taken over the Paramount, 
at Lewiston, formerly operated by A. 
H. Hilton. It has been closed since 

August. 



Hoquiam, is to have a new house 
which will be operated by G. M. Ter- 
hune, who recently sold his Rex at 
Spokane. Construction has just be- 
gun. The house will seat 800. 



John Hamrick owner of a chain of 
Blue Mouse theaters in the North- 
west, has launched a Singers Popular- 
ity Contest in his Seattle, Portland 
and Tacoma houses. Judgment is to 
be made by the audiences. Prizes 
aggregate $1,000 in gold. 



New Contract 

(Continued from Page 1) 

The employer shall have the right 
l( make any changes or eliminations 
iu the Bcenario provided the minimum 
term of employment is not thereby 
n 1 1 need. .should such changes in 
the scenario eliminate the part en- 
tirely, provided the actor is notified 
prior to the commencement date 
the contract, the employer may can- 
cel the contract by paying the actor 
one week's salary. 

Frank Gillmore, executive secretary 
of the Equity, stated that a movie 
strike is not contemplated. He said 
that Will H. Hays and other film 
leaders had given a sympathetic 
hearing to the proposals of the mo- 
tion picture actors. His criticisms, 
he explained, had not been directed 
at the first grade picture companies, 
but applied to difficulties which had 
been experienced with certain other 
producers. 

There was no information forth- 
coming from the Hays office yester- 
day regarding the Actors Equity 
contract. 



Montreal Taxes 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Montreal — Theaters here pay enor- 
mous taxes. First there is the annual 
license fee of $500 and another fee of 
50 cents per seat; special tax for 
operators and electricians; civic as- 
sessment on premises; special taxes 
en canopies, electric signs, motors 
and boilers; civic taxes, snow clean- 
ing, etc., and also the business tax. 
Apart from these levies are the 
Amusement tax of 10 per cent and 
the censorship fees. 



THE SUPER 39 

MARION DAVIES 



in 



a 



Adam and Eva 



No. 9 



>> 



A Cosmopolitan Production Directed by Robert Vignola 

From the play by'Guy Bolton and George Middleton 

Scenario by Luther Reed 



THIS up-to-date comedy ran a year on 
the New York stage. Its story is uni- 
versally popular, its love interest most ap- 
pealing. 

It's a story of the American home as we 
all know it, and deals with a father who can't 
handle his family, so turns them over to an 



efficiency expert, who changes them com- 
pletely. 

"Adam and Eva" was directed by the man 
who made "When Knighthood Was in 
Flower," and has a distinguished supporting 
cast including T. Roy Barnes, Tom Lewis 
and William Norris. 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



"Dark Secrets." 
"My American Wife." 
"Drums of Fate." 
"Nobody's Money." 




^FAMOUS PLAYERSIASKY CORPORATION]^ 



ZUHOP A-.,, 




No. 


6 


"Adam's Rib.'' 


No. 


7 


"Java Head." 


No. 


8 


"The White Flower." 




CC (paramount (picture 



WATCH THIS 

SPACE 

MONDAY 

FOR 

No. 10 



THE 



-Z&>« 



DAILY 



Thursday, January 4, 1923 



Putting It Over 



Here is how a brother ex- 
hibitor put his show over. 
Send along your ideas. Let 
the other fellow know how you 
cleaned up. 



Sherlock Puzzle Puzzles 

Tulsa, Ukla. — The manager of the 
Majestic, got his townsmen puzzled 
into attending a showing of "Sher- 
lock Holmes," through a new varia- 
tion in the co-operative page advertis- 
ing stunt. 

He took one of the "Sherlock 
Holmes" stills, cut it into twenty- 
three segments and printed one or 
two segments in each ad that ap- 
peared on the page. Free tickets to 
the Saturday matinee were offered to 
all persons who cut out ihe segments 
and correctly pasted them together 
and presented them at the box office. 
Hundreds of solutions were handed in. 

Bonns Works in Chicago 

Chicago — An effective advertising 
campaign was held in conjunction 
with the booking of Goldwyn's 
"Broken Chains" at Balaban & Katz's 
Chicago, under the supervision of 
tddie Bonns, of New York and Wal- 
ter D. Nealand of Goldwyn's Chicago 
branch. 

A strong newspaper campaign, in- 
cluding full page advertisements, bill- 
boards on every elevated station for 
two weeks prior to the opening and a 
"Traveling Billboard," consisting of 
a truck carrying two large painted 
scenes and a six sheet on the rear 
helped considerably, as did tie ups 
with the United Cigar Stores and the 
Weed Tire Chains Company. 

Another good stunt was having 
Nimmo Black, aviator, fly over the 
city with his plane covered with signs 
painted in 16 foot letters. Twenty 
thousand cards were dropped into 
the streets from the plane for five 
consecutive days. 



Using Racial Propaganda 

Detroit — The exploitation of 
"Hungry Hearts" at the Broadway 
Strand, Christmas week, resulted in 
the most extensive propaganda among 
the Jewish people that has ever been 
known in this city, conducted by Phil 
Gleichman and John Wilstach, De- 
troit Goldwynner. 

The European Jewish Women's 
Welfare Asso. handled 5,000 tickets 
on a percentage basis. The member- 
ship of 1,500 went to work with a will. 
The picture was endorsed by the lead- 
ing Jewish Lodge, B'nai Brith, and 
the United Jewish Charities, as being 
of great benefit to the race, because 
of its sympathetic appeal. 

The B'nai Brith printed an editorial 
supporting the picture in its official 
organ. "The Jewish Chronicle," "The 
Jewish Today," and "The Forward" 
were advertised in extensively, and 
carried favorable editorial comment. 
Five thousand folders, and five hun- 
dred cards in Yiddish were distributed 
in the Jewish neighborhood. News- 
papers and bill-boards were both used 
stiongly. The Detroit Times used a 
"Hungry Hearts" story with a seven 
column heading splash across the 
page. 



"Police Left in Good 
Humor After Frame-Up" 

Lawrence, Mass. — Fred Demara of 
the Palace got the whole town on its 
guard against Boston Blackie, Peter 
the Red,, and Count Ivan, interna- 
tional crooks- — "The Face in the Fog." 
Demara sent a message from Boston 
to the chief of police and the mayor 
telling them to be on the look-out for 
the famous crooks and "if you see or 
hear anything of the 'Face in the 
Fog,' that's the clue. Watch out." 

The police suspected a hoax but 
played safe, put out detectives and 
gave the story to the newspapers. The 
police were sore at first, but Demara 
gave each officer a pass, and now 
they're laughing about it. The chief 
came through with a published en- 
dorsement. 



Red Lights Fan "Flame" 

Danville, 111. — For the showing of 
"The Eternal Flame" at the Fisher, 
the manager used a striking night 
ballyhoo. A flat wagon was draped 
in red and drawn by horses blanketed 
in red. The driver was masked out 
and in the center of the wagon the 
lettering, "The Eternal Flame" was 
illuminated by an artificial flame of 
red lights. Thin paper streamers 
whirled in the air by a concealed elec- 
tric fan gave the effect. 

Among a dozen tie-ups effected by 
the theater a novel one was that with 
the lighting and heating company 
which used the sign: "'The Eternal 
Flame' of love lights your lives. Let 
the * * * heater heat your home." 

Small bottles of perfume were 
given away to ladies attending the 
opening night, a tie up with the manu- 
facturer by which four gross of these 
sample bottles were donated and two 
gross more were bought by the the- 
ater. As a result of the deal the 
retail store handling the line of 
cosmetics arranged a handsome win- 
dew display for "The Eternal 
Flame." 



Winking Contest 

Sharon, Pa. — The winking contest, 
used with such success by Jacob 
Fabian when First National's "East 
is West" played the Regent Theater, 
Paterson, N. J., was sold to a news- 
paper as a circulation building idea 



when the picture played the Liberty. 
The Sharon Herald footed the bill for 
the contest, including the prize awards 
because of its faith in the idea to 
build reader interest. The only ex- 
pense incurred by the exhibitor con- 
sisted of the slides used to advertise 
this exploitation in his theater. 



Reproductive quality enables the sensitive 
emulsion to correctly portray every step of 
gradation from highest light to deepest 
shadow. 

EASTMAN 
POSITIVE FILM 

faithfully reproduces every tone of the 
negative. It carries the quality through 
to the screen. 

Eastman Film, both regular and tinted base — 
now available in nine colors, is identified through- 
out its length by the words "Eastman" "Kodak" 
stenciled in black letters in the transparent margin. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



BH 



An Unsolicited Telegram 



CLASS OF SERVICE 


oYMBOL 


Telegram 




Day Lerter 


Blue 


Night Message 


Nite 


Nlflhl Letter 


NL 


It none of these three symbols 
appears after the check (number of 
words) this is a telegram. Other- 
wise its character Is Indicated by the 
tymbol appearing after the check. 




NEWCOMB CARLTON. PRESIDENT 



UNION 
AM 



GEORGE W. E. ATKINS. FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT 



CUSS OF SERVICE 



Teleoranl 



Day Letter 



Night Meesago 



Night Letter 



N L 



If none of these three symbols 
appears after the check i number of 
words* this Is q telegram. Other- 
wise Its character ia ind icate I b* the 
symbol appearing after me ch«ck. 



RECEIVED AT 

36 PY PDG 



45 



NL RELAY 

ALTOONA PENN DEC 28 1922 
AL LICHTMAN CORP 

1650 BROADWAY NEWYORK NY 
WE ARE PLAYING THORNS AND ORANGE BLOSSOMS ALL THIS WEEK 
STOP THE PICTURE HAS CREATED MUCH FAVORABLE COMMENT STOP 
WE WANT ALL EXHIBITORS TO KNOW THAT OUR BOX-OFFICE 
RECEIPTS INCREASED DAILY STOP LETS HAVE MORE PICTURES 
THAT PLEASE THE PATRONS AND THE BOX-OFFICE 

SILVERMANS STRAND 

1117A DEC 29 






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#"•:•: 




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THE DEERSLAYER 

ddqptecl Bom James Penimore Cooper's 
<9ia#icTeather Stocking Tales'^ 

Qjl masterly proiaokion, ,fiik>hfuJl$ adapted f torn tk& 
powerful v)orks qf this inber-natioiiattg famous authon 
(JA/btP available Jbr immediate &sbributioiu~ 

GUINGOPICTUHES COMPANY 

1476 3road$q% Mv)3ork&ib^(Ph0W *&ryant 4416.. 





JIFICBNG'-E., 








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DAILV 



Thursday, January 4, 1923 



Among The "Independents 



9 9 



Chandlee Adapting Barton Editorials 
Harry Chandlee lias been selected 
to adapt the Bruce Barton famous 
magazine editorials to - the screen. 
The series is being released by Sec- 
ond National. 



Logue to Have Own Company 
(Special hi THE FILM DAILY) 

Hollywood — Charles Logue has 
ji.st arrived here from New York, and 
plans to produce pictures .under his 
own banner very shortly. 



More Big Game Pictures 

"Hunting Big Game in Africa with 
Gun and Camera," by H. A. Snow 
the newest motion pictures from the 
Dark Continent wl ich were taken by 
the expedition, fitted out by the 
Museum of Natural History of Oak- 
land, Calif., follows the Fairbanks 
run at the Lyric and will be shown 
for the first time Monday night. 
Ti ey are booked to remain for a 
i in. The picture is in 10 reels. J. 
McCarthy and Theodore Mitchell 
will handle the road shows. The pro- 
duction is presented by Eugene H. 
Loth. 



Shopgirl Contest 

C. B. C. Film have notified terri- 
torial holders of the feature that they 
may arrange with an exhibitor who 
runs the feature for the selection of 
the most beautiful shopgirl in the city. 
This may be done by tying up a 
newspaper on the selection, or doing 
it through a committee of prominent 
citizens. The most beautiful girl 
from each city is to be, in turn, passed 
upon by a committee headed by Es- 
telle Taylor and Mae Busch, who 
play the shopgirls in the C. B. C. pic- 
ture, Joe Brandt. Director Edward 
1 ( Saint, and Harry Cohn and the 
one selected as most attractive is to 
be given a chance to play in "Temp- 
tation," the third picture on the series. 



Handling Aralma Product 

The following exchanges are hand- 
ling the American Home Life Series, 
ed upon articles dealing with 
American home life appearing in The 
Vv oman's Home Companion, and pro- 
duced by The Aralma Film Co. 

Royal Pictures Inc., Philadelphia, 
1 ! ;..; Qualtoplav Film Corp., Syracuse, 
N V.; Crescent Film Company, 
Omaha, Neb.; Crescent Film Com- 
pany, Kansas City, Mo.; Progress Pic- 
tures, Inc., New Orleans, La.; Pro- 
gicss Pictures. Inc., Atlanta, Ga. ; 
United Film Service, St. Louis, Mo.; 
Lande Film Dist. Corp., Cincinnati, 
Ohio; Favorite Film Company, De- 
troit, Midi.; Lande Film Dist. Corp., 
( leveland, Ohio; Quality Film Corp., 
Pittsburgh, Pa.; Pioneer Film Co. of 
X. I.. Boston, Mas-.; Specialty Film 
Company, Dallas, Texas; Arrow 
Photoplays Co., Denver, Colo.; Ar- 
row Photoplays Co., Salt Lake City, 
Utah; Arrow Photoplays Co., Seattle, 
Wash.; Co-operative Film Co., San 
Francisco, Cal.; Co-operative Film 
Co., Los Angeles, Cal.; Elliott Film 
Company, Minneapolis, Minn. 



"Third Alarm" At Astor Monday 
"The Third Alarm" will be pre- 
sented by the F. B. O. at t! e Astor 
next Monday. 



Thorpe Supervising 

Dick Thorpe lias lie n appointed 
supervisor oi" productions by (. . 
Burr. 



C. 



New Advertising Head 
Robert McGrath has 1) •en appoint- 
ed advertising manager and general 
purchasing agent by Pfodu< :rs 
Security. . 



Suit Biscontinved 

Supreme Court Justice Gavegan 
has signed an order discontinuing a 
Miit of Patrick A. Powers against the 
Ciark-Cornelius Corp., because the 

case lias been settled. 



Wolf to Denver 

Jules Wolf, formerly manager for 
Educational in Los Angeles, has 
been transferred to the management 
of the Denver office, succeeding E. 
J. Drucker. M. N. Wolf is the new 
Los Angeles manager. 



Big Australian Deal 

Al Lichtman has concluded a deal 
with Millard Johnson, American re- 
presentative of Australasian Films, 
Ltd., which will give them the ex- 
clusive right to the output of his com- 
pany for the first year in Australia 
and New Zealand. 



Mastodon Bookings 

Lester F. S'cott, Jr., sales repre- 
sentative for C. C. Burr, has returned 
from a Southern trip on which he 
closed contracts for "Sure Fire 
Flint." with R. D. Craver, First Na- 
tional for his territ i ,r\ ; True Thomp- 
son. True Film Co. Dallas, Texas, 
for Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas, 
and William Hurlbut of the Michi- 
gan Favorite Film Co. 



Two New Lichtman Representatives 

(Spe. ial I- 1 UK FILM DAILY) 

Denver — Edward Grossman form- 
er manager for Asso Prod., has 
been added to the Al Lichtman 
Corp., as special representative. 



Foster Moore, former sales man- 
ager for Jan- Film, is another special 
representative who has joined the 
company. 



Win Suit 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Seattle— $-10(1 was awarded the 
Seattle Film Exchange in their 
counter claim for damages against 
J. B. Sanfonl, who had instituted 
suit for $l,2(ii). Sanford cancelled 
a contract whereby lie was to 
distribute the Seattle company's 
pii duct in Portland, while his pro- 
duct was in turn to be released 
through their offices here, lie ean- 
< 11. (1 his contract, opened his offices 
in Seattle, refused to fill bookings 
n ade by the Seattle Film Exchange, 
later playing the same houses with I 
his product. 1 



HIRAM ABRAMS 



Do You Want 



s 



uccess 



For 1923 
? 



Every Exhibitor 
Wants It 



7Ae BRADSTREET 
of FILMDOM 





^recochizee 
Authority 




Vol. XXIII No. 4 



Friday, January 5, 1923 



Price 5 Cent? 



Big Pay 

Reported Sam Goldwyn Will Give 

Fitzmaurice $100,000 a Year And 

50 Per Cent of Profits 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Hollywood — It is reported here 
that Samuel Goldwyn has arranged 
with George Fitzmaurice for the 
next year, upon the completion of 
his contract with Famous Players. 
This, it is said, terminates in a short 
time, after Fitzmaurice makes "The 
Cheat." 
has guaranteed Fitzmaurice $100,000 

According to the report Goldwyn 
a year and a 50 per cent share in the 
profits of his productions. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Finklestein Here 

M. L. Finklestein and Edward 
Ruben, son of H. B. Ruben, of 
Minneapolis are in town. At the 
Ambassador. 



Grainger's Trip 
James A. "Jimmy" Grainger, Gold- 
wyn, did not leave as expected on 
Wednesday for a swing through the 
country but will probably get away 
on Monday. 



Sound Sense 

Says Laemmle Relative to Production 
Costs — Universal's Plans 

The following has been received 
from Carl Laemmle. 

"Editor, The Film Daily: 

"I've never seen quite so much 
good, sound, common sense packed 
into a small space as you packed in- 
to your brief remarks about "Nega- 
tive Costs" in your Tuesday issue of 
the Film Daily. You not only had 
your figures and your facts straight, 
but you showed exactly what they 
meant, where they are leading to 
and where they get off. 

"It may interest you to know that 
you have almost exactly summed up 
the Universal's future policy. We 
are going to make more and more 
negatives for less than $100,000 
apiece and less and less negatives 
costing over that amount, for the 
very reason given in your story. 

"You've given a wise suggestion 
to the whole industry on how to 
start the new year on the right foot 
and I congratulate you." 



Deal Closed 



Millions Involved With Famous Taking Over Lynch Interests 

in the South — Best of Feeling Prevails — Lynch One 

of Largest Stockholders in Famous — Mich- 

aelove Probably General Manager 



MacLean's First for Associated 

Douglas MacLean's first starring 
venture for Asso. Exhibitor release 
will be a picturization of "The Avia- 
tor." Production is about to start at 
Hollywood. 



Naked Truth Dinner 
The A. M. P. A. annual "Naked 
Truth" dinner will be held at the 
Eiltmore sometime in April. There 
will be an inaugural dinner to the 
incoming officers of the Advertisers 
at the Boulevard Jan. 25. 



The Troubles of an 
Exhibitor 

Castoroyl. Mo. 
Dear Danny: 

I have read with interest the 
troubles of Clem Deneker of Split Lip 
and Pneumonia, Nevada. Seeing 
that these people are working up a 
good big circuit and that they can't 
get anything better to run than 
"Annie's Aching Adam's Apple" and 
"Lena's Load." I have a bright idea. 
Please take this up with Mr. Deneker 
and maybe he can get some actors 
and a producer to produce my scen- 
ario. For fear that some of the pro- 
ducers and scenario writers will steal 
my thought, I will only explain the 
action of one scene. 

In this particular scene, the villain 
drives a hole in the bottom of a large 
ocean liner. Of course, the boat 
(Continued on Page S) 



Aldine Reverts to Stanley 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Philadelphia — Metro has relinquish- 
ed the Aldine for special showings 
and hereafter the Aldine will be 
handled as part of the Stanley chain. 
Metro held 
months. 



As exclusively announced in yesterday's issue of THE 
FILM DAILY, a deal involving millions was practically closed 
yesterday between Famous Players and Stephen A. Lynch. 

As a result, an important official of Famous Players, will 
become president of Southern Enterprises. Dan A. Michaelove 
will be retained in all likelihood, as general manager. It is 
understood that the personnel of the Lynch organization will 
remain practically intact excepting that Y. Frank Freeman, 
who has practically been in charge of Southern Enterprises, will 
become the president of the corporation controlled by S. A. 
Lynch, which handles "Tanlac." E. C. Holcomb, Lynch's form- 
er treasurer in Southern Enterprises, also goes with the Tanlac 

organization. 

Fn-nklyn in Charge 



Superba Lease Expires 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — The lease on the 
Superba, the Universal house here has 
expired and will not be renewed. No 
plans for releasing another house for 
the * house for ' several | Universal productions have been an- 
nounced. 




The practical operation of the 10C [I 
oi more houses in the Lynch string 
will be in the hands of Harold B,j 
Franklyn for Famous. The exjl 
changes will, of course, he directed! 
by S. R. Kent. 

Best of Feeling Prevails 
It is understood that the very hesl 
of feeling exists between all parties 
concerned in the deal. While Lyncr 
will sever his connection activel> 
with the picture industry, he will stil! 
retain his large stock holdings ifl 
Famous Players, and those in th« 
know say that he is probably one o) 
the largest stock holders of the cor- 
poration. 

Lynch, Freeman and Michaelove 
who have been here closing the 
transaction, left yesterday for At- 
lanta. 

It is said that Lynch will immedi- 
ately organize a trust company ir 
Atlanta with capital of $5,000,000. 



«A Great Picture»-is the universal opinion of everyone who has seen 
Victor Schertzinger's production "The Kingdom Within . *ea£rmg Kus 
sell Simpson, Gaston Glass and Pauline Star ke. ! ^g draw^ most 
everywhere," says Motion Picture News. A Hodkinson Picture. Aavt. 



Hodkinson Secures Clifton Featur* 
"Down to the Sea in Ships" pro! 
duced by Elmer Clifton has been 
secured for release by \Y. W. Hod] 
kinson. Clifton was at work a loud 
time on this special which has for iti 
particular thrill the overturning of £ 
skiff loaded by men by a whale: th< 
subsequent capture of the whale, and 
a lot of material devoted to whaling) 
The production was made in and 
around New Bedford, the Caribbear^ 
Sea and off Hatteras. 



THE 



■c^Hk 



DAILV 



Friday, January 5, 1923 




>ol. XXIII No. 4 Friday, Jan. 5, 1923 Price 5Cents 

Copyright 1922. Wi.l's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y.,_ by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 
J. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone. Hollywood 
1603. 
Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative. — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau, Prague (Czecho- Slo- 
vakia), Wenzelsplatz. 

Quotations 

High Low CIom Sales 

East. Kod. 903,4 89^ 90^ 2,000 

F. P.-L. ..93 91J4 92 3,000 

do pfd. .. 98 98 98 300 

Twyn .... 5 4%, S 200 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's ... 1954 \9% 195^ 1,000 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 

Mid-West Notes 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Bellevue, la. — J. E. Grimm has sold 
the Cozy to James Wright. 

Keokuk, la. — Baker-Dodge owners 
of the Regent and Grand here have 
closed the Colonial. 

Detroit — B. Berkowitz is erecting a 
theater costing $80,000. at Shoemaker 
and St. Clair Aves. 

Des Moines. — Bob Matson is back 
with Associated Exhibitors covering 
the Eastern half of the territory. 



ft (SkicLcatlcrvaA (J<CctuA£A- 




JUPITER FILM CORP. 

1482 Broadway 

N«w York 

We buy righta only for entire 

Latin America. 



WANTED 

Man as office manager for agency. 
Must have had experience in business 
end of motion pictures and theatricals. 
State age, experience, salary expected. 
Address Box 0-44, care The Film 
Daily. 



In the Courts 

A confession of judgment by Her- 
bert Brenon in favor of Messmore 
Kendall for $8,455 has been filed in 
tlit Supreme Court. Mr. Brenon 
Mated that he borrowed $5,600 from 
Mr. Kendall in 1914, which, with in- 
terest since that time, makes the 
amount of the judgment. 



A default judgment for $3,722 
against the Motion Picture Post has 
been filed in the Supreme Court by 
the Ad Press for work, services and 
materials. 



Big Pay 

(Continued from Page 1) 
f Gossip out here is to the effect that 
Fitzmaurice has been making about 
$30,000 a year with Famous, and 
that he has had several offers from 
producers ranging around $50,000 a 
year. The offer of Sam Goldwyn, 
however, it is said, has killed off all 
other bidders. Ouida Bergere, Fitz- 
niaurice's wife will, it is understood, 
be included in the deal, to handle 
scenarios. 



The Ascher Features, Inc., filed 
suit in the Supreme Court against 
Ralph Spence for $15,000 damages. 
The complaint alleges that in May, 
1920, an agreement was made by the 
defendant with Sidney Ascher, 
Joseph A. Jacobs and James L. 
Burke, who have assigned their claim 
to the plaintiff, whereby the persons 
named were to buy negatives and 
certain positive films of "The Gentle- 
man Crook" and form a distributing 
company for it, and Spence was to 
re-edit, cut and finish the films and 
put them in shape for distribution, 
and have them ready by July, 1920. 
It is alleged that they paid $1,500 for 
the films, spent $500 additional, and 
organized the Super-Humor Films, 
Inc.. as distributor at a cost of $600. 
After the films were delivered to the 
defendant, it is alleged that he did 
nothing with them and refused to 
return them. 



The Appellate Term has dismissed 
a suit of Mildred Travers, child- 
actress, against Plymouth Films for 

$100. 



Held Over 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
London, Ont. — "The Man From 
Glengarry" was so successful at the 
Grand Opera House here this week 
that it is being brought back for a 
special engagement next week. 



Bray Sales 

Contracts have been closed for 
Bray Magazine and for Bray Nature 
Pictures, with the Motion Picture 
Dis. Corp., Boston, for New England 
territory; and with Renown Pictures, 
New York, for New York State and 
Northern New Jersey territory. 



Daab Studio Publicist 

Hyatt Daab, for three years con- 
nected with the advertising and pub- 
licity department of F. B. O., has 
left for Los Angeles, where he will 
be in charge of the R-C Studio pub- 
licity department. 

Ben Grimm will occupy the posi- 
tion left vacant by Daab. 



Second National Plans 

Second National Pictures announce 
for the new year that American made 
productions exclusively will be 
handled hereafter. They say that 
two American producing companies 
now are under agreement to deliver 
their entire product to Second Na- 
t-onal. Mission Films, and Better 
Day Pictures, producers of the Bruce 
Earton editorials. 



So far as is known in the East the 
only productions which Goldwyn has 
arranged for is the picturization of 
"Potash & Perjmutter." This type 
of material is quite different from 
what Fitzmaurice has made for 
Famous, and in all likelihood Fitz- 
maurice will not handle this pro- 
duction. 

Nothing has come from the Coast 
to indicate where Goldwyn will re- 
lease his productions. 



"Robin Hood" at Capitol 
"Robin Hcod" will go into the 
Capitol at the end of this month for 
an indefinite run. 



Shipman's Distribution 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
T o r o n t o — Canadian Educational 
Films will handle the physical distri- 
bution of all the Ernest Shipman 
Canadian-made productions. The 
selling forces will be headed by Wil- 
liam Cranston at Toronto, and by 
Burpee and West at Montreal. 



Chadwick Pictures Again in Field 

Chadwick Pictures Corp. will again 
enter the field distributing in the open 
market. I. E. Chadwick who oper- 
ates Merit will be president, and 
Jacques Kopfstein general manager. 



"David Copperfield" Here 
Andre Olson, Nordisk Films, is 
here with a print of "David Copper- 
field" made by the Nordisk concern. 
Hopp Hadley is preparing it for pre- 
sentation. Olson is at the McAlpin. 



Warner's announce a version of 
"David Copperfield" with Wesley 
Barry and the Lesser organization is 
also reported to be preparing a pic- 
ture on the same subject. 



Guts and Flashes 

Ira H. Morgan will photograph 
'Little Old New York." 



Monte Blue, who has the lead in 
Warner Brothers' "Main Street" 
leaves for the coast Sunday. 



Wesley Barry is here for a few 
days. He will leave for Cleveland 
shortly in connection with the show- 
ing of "Little Heroes of the Street." 

Celia Krieger, after six months of 
technical training as a scenario 
writer at the Warner studios, has re- 
turned to New York. At the Albert. 



Daniel Carson Goodman, author 
and producer of "Has the World 
Gone Mad," is now cutting and edit- 
ing this production. Actual filming 
was completed last week under the 
direction of J. Searle Dawley. 



Flagg Talks 

James Montgomery Flagg, the art- 
ist, spoke to the A. M. P. A. yester- 
day on art in poster work. 

WANTED 

Experienced laboratory manager for 
plant in East. Must be good 
mechanic and know service require- 
ments film industry. Give full de- 
tails, first letter as to age, experience, 
salary desired, etc. Address Box 
AA— Film Daily, New York. 



CHAS. 0. BAUMANN, 



Pre*. 



RESOURCES - $5,000,000 
— LEGAL RATES — 



PRODUCERS & STARS 

represented. Also every form of 
financial aervice rendered in connec- 
tion therewith — at legal rates. 



GREAT NORTHERN FINANCE CORP. 

Knickerbocker Building 

Broadway at 42nd Street, N. Y. City 
Telephone Bryant 2989 



International* sDWlribiitersi-tfof 
MOTION PICTURES* 



»», • <&3 



ra&isiSfii 



In ie?-0cEAN Film Corporatjon 



INTER-OCEAN BUILDING 

218 WEST 42nd ST. NEW YORK 

BRYANT 7812 

WHEN YOU THINK OF 
FOREIGN THINK OF 

INTER-OCEAN 




ART TITLES 

LOUIS MEYER 

Craftsmen Film Lab. 

251 West 19th St. 
Watkini 7260-7461 



NEGATIVE TITLES 

10 cents per foot, including cards. 
Through our revolutionizing process 
we give you, choice of 10 high class 
hand lettered alphabets. The highest 
class illustrations. 24 hour service. 

TITLEGRAPH STUDIOS 

203 West 49th St. Circle 10,056 

Laboratory Wad. 3443 



THE 

Friday, January 5, 1923 £ W^^^T''' DAILY 



&Jfrl 



Here^s the answer to a puzzle — 

We often wonder why certain pictures go over so big. 
Pictures like "Humoresque," "Miracle Man" or 
"Over the Hill." |^Many L of the greatest hits are with- 
out famous stories or famous stars. Why£ do they 
break box office records? 

The answer is— 

They make people feel what the screen doesn V show 

Such pictures _are rare but Edwin Care we' s "Mighty 
Lak A. Rose'* is one of them. It is from Curtis 
Benton's original story of high society and low society. 

It has a title the whole world loves. 




THE 




DAILY 



Friday, January 5, 1923 



Putting It Over 



Here is how a brother ex- 
hibitor put his show over. 
Send along your ideas. Let 
the other fellow know how you 
cleaned up. 



Battle Scene Boosts Picture 

Knoxville, Tenn. — A simply con- 
structed battle scene showing inci- 
dents from "Hurricane's Gal," did 
more good to the Strand than their 
usual advertising policy. The scene 
pictured U. S. destroyers in pursuit 
ot the "Tahiti Belle" and was lavishly 
colored and mounted. 




Banners Form Barricade on Horizon 

Stamford, Conn. — Manager Sam 
Weiss of the Alhambra is away from 
the center of the town. To remedy 
this he had 30 foot banners painted 
and spotted on the tops of buildings 
in the main section ot the town, ad- 
vertising "Oliver Twist," that dom- 
inated the horizon in all directions 
and brought people away from the 
main section to his house. 



Playlet Contest 

Louisville, Ky. — in preparation for 
a two week engagement of "Uliver 
Twist" at the Mary Anderson here, 
Manager George A. Wine offered a 
:?50 prize for the best 20 minute one 
act play based upon any incident in 
Dickens' "Oliver Twist." 

The Mary Anderson remained in 
the background, the contest being 
sponsored by the Louisville Theater 
(juild and publicized by the Times 
and the Courier Journal. 



Ten Thousand Dimes Do Good Work 

Sharon, Pa. — Ten thousand dimes 
placed in a window of the McDowell 
National Bank, helped to exploit "The 
Light in the Dark" when that attrac- 
tion played the Liberty. 

This display was part of a tie-up 
effected with the bank and was visual- 
ized by a card which read "Come out 
of the dark and into the light, open a 
savings' account and start the New 
Year right by seeing 'The Light in 
the Dark' at the Liberty." 



Telegrams Boost "Sonny" 

York, Pa. — Manager Kelly of the 
Oipheum sprang a variation on the 
usual postcard and "teaser" campaign 
when he sent out 400 teaser telegrams 
aj part of the exploitation of First 
National's "Sonny." The wire read 
"Am coming home. Meet me at Or- 
pheum tonight. Sonny." By a judi- 
cious selection of those to whom the 
telegram was sent this stunt resulted 
in word of mouth advertising that 
well repaid. 

Uses Diamond Display 

Salt Lake City — Anything worth 
$100,000 is bound to attract attention, 
and the display for "Pink Gods" was 
worth just that. 

George Carpenter of the Para- 
mount-Empress Theater, and Rick 
Ricketson, Paramount exploiteer, tied 
up Boyd Park, the leading jewelry 
store for a display of diamonds, 
models of the famous stones of his- 
tory, the Cullinan, Star of India, and 
others, together with mounted stills 
from the picture. 



Coast Brevities 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Hollywood — Henry MacRae will 
leave shortly for Siam to film a series 
based on Siamese life. 



Noah Beery will support Viola 
Dana in "Her Fatal Millions" which 
John Arnold will photograph. 



Harold McCord has arrived from 
New York to edit Selznick's "The 
Common Law." 



anity Fair" is finished. Eleanor 
bardman will have the leading role 
in "Souls for Sale." 



James W. Home, formerly with 
Universal and I nee, will direct Ethel 
Clayton in "The Greater Glory," her 
third production for F. B. O. 



"Too Many Lovers," starring Baby 
Peggy, has been finished. Herman 
Raymaker and Sig Neufeld are work- 
ing on her next to be made on her 
return from the East. 



Doris May, Harry Myers, Hobart 
Bosworth, Miss Dupont, Bryant 
Washburn and Phyllis Haver have 
been added to cast of Selznick's "The 
Common Law." 



Noah Beery has been engaged by 
the Warner Brothers to play the part 
of Adolf Valborg in the screen ver- 
sion of Sinclair Lewis' novel, "Main 
Street," being directed by Harry 
Beaumont. 



Camera work on Chaplin's "Des- 
tiny," starring Edna Purviance, has 
been resumed, after two weeks ill- 
ness of Miss Purviance. The produc- 
tion will be released through United 
Artists. 



Shooting has begun on Universal's 
"Nobody's Bride," starring Herbert 
Rawlinson. Herbert Blache is di- 
recting. Cast includes Edna Murphy, 
Alice Lake, Harry Van Meter, Frank 
Brownlee, Phillips Smalley, Lillian 
Langdon, Robert Dudley and Sidney 
Eracy. 

H. E. GAUSMAN. 



House Changes 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Wausau, Wis.— F. T. Welter has 
bought the Grand from Mr. & Mrs. 
C. S. Cone. 



Drumright, Okla. — R. W. 
has purchased the Strand. 



Elrod 



Columbia Stressing Pictures 

According to Prof. Egbert, of 
Columbia motion pictures are becom- 
ing so important that they deserve 
academic recognition; Columbia has 
offered photoplay courses for several 
years. 



Bartlett's Job 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Randolph Bartlett 
has been appointed business manager 
of the editorial department of Famous 
Players-Lasky studio. 



A. W. Carrick To Buffalo 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Buffalo — A. W. Carrick, formerly 
manager of the Hodkinson Pitts- 
burgh branch, now has charge of the 
Hodkinson office in this city. G. R. 
Amsworth succeeds Carrick. 



EVERY DAY 

IN 

EVERY WAY | 

THE FILM DAILY I 

GROWS | 

BETTER AND BETTER I 

Subscribe Today j 

H 
The Film Daily 

71 West 44th St., New York City 

Kindly enter my subscription to The Film Daily for 
one year, starting immediately, to include 

THE FILM DAILY— 313 Issues— Every Day 
Including Weekly Reviews — 52 Issues 

1922 Year Book— Cloth Bound— 500 pages 

Subscription, $10— Foreign, $15 

Name 

Theatre 

Address 

Ulllllll^llltllUlllllllllillllllillhillliiillllUillM 



CAPITOL- NEW YORK-BOOKS 



FIRST OF THE "BETTER FILM" TWO-REELERS 



"BETTER FILMS" 

AT THE 

CAPITOL 



PRODUCED BY 



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SUGGESTED BY AN ARTICLE BY 

ALICE AMES WINTER 

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AT ALL 

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DISTRIBUTED BY 



Aralma film Co, Inc. AMERICAN HOME LIFE SERIES Alexander Film Corp. 



LFriday, January 5, .1923 



The Troubles of an 
Exhibitor 

(Continued from Page 1) 
arts to sink because the water 
shes in, but now comes the climax 
the scene. The hero,, (and I think 
e can get Rudolph Valentino to plav 
iis part because he is out of work 
)w) remembers what happened to 
e Lusitania. Wading into the water 
> to his neck, with a large drill he 
mply drills a large hole along side 
the first hole and lets all the water 
it again and thus saves the boat 
om sinking. 

Another thing about my scenario 
that the cast won't be expensive, 
he leading lady dies about an hour 
tiore the picture opens so you can 
t Norma Talmadge or any other 
ar to play this part cheap. 
What worries me is the title for the 
cture. I was going to call it "Did 
le Sink or Was She Scuttled." I 
ve been fooled so many times on 
les that I will leave " it to the 
evada Circuit to suggest the title. I 
t fooled when I thought the "Four 
orsemen of the Apocalypse" was an 
imal picture. In fact the exhibitor 
this town ran this picture as a 
)uble feature with one called "Some 
T M Oats." Probably he intended 
feed the horses for fear they would 
op dead during the show and crab 

act. 

In case this scenario meets with 
ur approval, I have another storv 
mine called "The Football Coach" 
ut what is puzzling me is the fact 
at every kind of a coach that I have 
er seen has wheels on it but this 
e hasn't. What do you suggest? 
Tell Mr. Deneker that I may be in 
vada soon because the other night 
en the way-freight came in I went 
wn to get the mail without a hat 
id coat on. My left lung has been 
sthering me since and I may have to 
[ out there for my health. In leav- 
g the town the freight pulled up 
e tracks, the post master got fired, 
the only way you can answer this 
ter is to address me care of Harry 
'eiss, First National Office, St. 
iuis, Mo. He will be coming through 
te in his car pretty soon and he will 
ing me the letter. 
Wishing you a good New Year, 
Sincerely yours, 

[ZZIE OOTSD. 




Northwest Notes 



(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Georgetown. Wash.— A committee 
o f local citizens plan to erect a new 
house here. 



Sheridan, Wyo. -- Fred Bezold. 
former owner of the Gem, has let 
contracts for a 900-seat house cost- 
ing $90,000 to be ready by May 1st 



La Grande. Ore.— The Star was 
damaged by fire in a store next door. 
It has been condemned, and is closed 
for repairs. 



Universale January Releases 

Universal will release five features 
"January in addition to "The Flirt." 
| order of release "The Flaming 
bur," starring Frank Mayo; "Kin- 
jjjd Courage," with Hoot Gibson; 
phe Scarlet Car," starring Herbert 
S.whnson; "The Ghost Patrol," with 
ilph Graves, and Bessie Love; and 
►hann Bojer's "The Power of a 
ie." 



Clover Productions Start 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Baltimore — Milton Caplan and 
arry S. Shapiro have formed Clover 
rbductions, with offices at 240 Falls- 
ay. Thev have acquired "The 
sildness of Youth," "The Wrong 
[bmen," six five-reel Westerns, six 
■p-reel Westerns and ten two-reel 
jriedies for distribution in Dela, 
#., Virginia and the Dist. of 
jJlumbia. 



Roundup, Mont. — The American 
destroyed by fire. John W. Ander- 
son, Jr., at this time does not know 
whether he will rebuild. 



Jensen & VonHerberg are rumored 
contemplating a temporary house in 
Astoria, to be later replaced by a 
fine theater. The rumor has not yet 
been confirmed. 



Weiser, Idaho — The Strand, form- 
eily operated by F. J. Becker, is 
being run temporarily by Mrs. Car- 
rie Barton, owner. Frank Mortimer, 
president and manager of the Stand- 
ard Amusement Co., expects to take 
the house over early in the new year. 



Seattle — John Hamrick opened a 
temporary Blue Mouse in Astoria, 
Christmas Day in Lovell's Garage 
with "Tess of the Storm Country" 
playing to packed houses. The con- 
verted garage boasts a Robert Mor- 
ton Organ, Simplex Machines, and 
is the finest "garage moving picture 
house" on record. 



PROOF! 



STUDIO FOR RENT 



One of the most modern studios 
in the East. 25 minutes from 
Times Square. Every modern 
device. Can be rented for any 
length of time. Terms reason- 



able. Address 



B-1923, care The Film Daily 



Indianapolis, Ind. 



Al Lichtman Corporation, 
1650 Broadway, 
New York. 

Gentlemen: 

We are happy to report that "SHADOWS" is a real box-office 
attraction. The patrons comments on the picture were "wonderful", 
"a real picture", and "the best acting ever seen". 

The picture opened very big and held up for the entire week. 
More pictures like this would be a pleasure to all concerned. 



Very truly yours, 

THE APOLLO THEATRE. 



■ 1 1 !■ ■■ m 




WANTED 

Negative shots of Paris, 
Champs D'elysees and 
Arc de Triomp, etc. 

Communicate with 

SOUTHARD BROWN 

Room 1510 

Loew State 

Theater Bldg. 



ATTENTION, SHOWMEN ! 

UNUSUAL OPPORTUNITY. 

HUGE ELECTRIC SIGN 

On Broadway, in Times 
Square, can be rented three 
weeks, beginning Monday, Jan. 
8th, at very reasonable price. 
Fine chance for new show or 
production. 

'Phone Bryant 6381 



Studio Manager — Or 
Broad Gauged Business Executive 

to supervise business details and 
studio personnel in N. Y. C. Should 
have had experience in handling large 
force with tact and initiative. Chris- 
tian — $100 Week. Vocational Bureau 
(Agency), 17 West 42nd St. 



WANTED 

Lease on desirable theatre property 
in Greater New York, Northern New 
Jersey or New York State. $10,000 to 
$20,000. All communications strictly 
confidential. Principals only mail 
full particulars. Address B-04, care 
The Film Daily. 



Stevens Dies 

Edwin Stevents, well known stage 
and screen actor, died at his home 
here at the age of sixty. 



Toronto House Reopens 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Toronto— The Regent was reopen- 
ed here with "The Man From Glen- 
garry; Clarence Robson manager. 



Film Regulation 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

San Francisco — The Board of 
Supervisors has passed an ordinance 
regulating, handling and storage of 
films; due to the recent fire on Film 
Row. A similar ordinance has been 
passed by the City Council of Oak- 
land. 



Clara Young's Next 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Hollywood — "Condelia the Magni- 
ficent," a story by LeRoy Scott, will 
be Harry Garson's next production 
for Metro. Clara Kimball Young will 
star. Production will be commenced 
early next month. Frank Beresford 
is writing the continuity. 



Hoxie Planning Own Company 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Hollywood — Jack Hoxie plans to 
head his own company producing 
westerns following the early expira- 
tion of his contract with Sunset Pro- 
ductions. His wife, Marion Sais, will 
head the scenario department, and 
may play leads. 



Midwest Sales 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Anchor announces 
that the Mid-West Dist. Corp. of 
Kansas City has bought the Peggy 
O'Day series of features, "The 
Stranger of the Hills" and "Another 
Man's Boots." 



Harry Charnas, Standard Film Ser- 
vice Co., Cleveland, has bought rights 
for the Arthur Trimble two-rcelers 
from Anchor Film. 



Seattle Election 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Seattle — At the annual election of 
the Northwest Film Board of Trade 
here the following officers were elect- 
ed: Guy Navarre, Fox Manager, 
president; Al Rosenberg, De Luxe 
Manager, vice-president; L. J. 
Schlaifer, Universal Manager, treas- 
urer; E. A. Lamb, assistant manager 
and booker. Select, executive secre- 
tary; J. A. Gage, Educational Man- 
ager, H. A. Black, Vitagraph Man- 
ager; trustees. 



This Title Has Been Drawing 

Interest For You For Two Generations 



"LOVE'S OLD SWEET SONG" 



A LUND PRODUCTION 
NORCA PICTURES, Inc. 1540 Broadway, N.Y. C. 






Friday, January 5, 192 



WILLIAM FOX 



Do You Want 

Success 

For 1923 

? 



Every Exhibitor 
Wants It 



7Ae BRADSTREET 
of FILMDOM 




20<?re<ochizei 
Authority 



Vol. XXIII No. 5 



Saturday, January 6, 1923 



Price 5 Ccnti 



Hays on Arbuckle 

Issues Final Statement- ""ays Ques- 
tion Must Be Left lly to 
Public 

The following statement v^as issued 
by Will Hays yesterday on the Ar- 
buckle matter, and refers to the sug- 
gestions and comments of all kinds 
and from all quarters that have been 
received by him. This, it is said, 
will be the final word on this matter. 
Says Hays. 

"All suggestions which have been 
received from all viewpoints, and 
they are many and varied, will be re- 
ferred to the proper parties. This 
is the kind of question that must be 
left finally to the judgment of the 
public on the one hand, and on the 
other hand to those who have busi- 
ness associations with the individual 
and the individual himself. I have 
removed the artificial situation of one 
man being or appearing to be the 
judge in such matters either for one 
hundred and ten million people, or 
for a great industry and art. Such 
a condition in the development of 
a business is absolutely unsound 
economically, and from every other 
standpoint, and permanently must 
not be. A temporary framework or 
scaffolding may be a very valuable 
tool for a period in the remodelling 
or construction of a great building, 
but it must be remembered as the 
building progresses that such struc- 
tures are only temporary facilities." 



Arbuckle Working? 

So Reported on Coast But Not Be- 
lieved in East — 'Frisco Capital 
Involved 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Hollywood — It is reported here 
that Gavin McNab, one of the lead- 
ing attorneys of the West, who de- 
fended Arbuckle in the three San 
Francisco trials, has gathered to- 
gether a group of San Francisco 
financiers, who have organized a 
motion-picture producing corporation 
to be capitalized at $100,00(1. 

The new film producing organiza- 
tion, which probably will seek a 
location in Los Angeles for produc- 
tion purposes, will be directed by At- 
torney McNab. but it will be Ar- 
buckle's company and the corpulent 
comedian will be its active head. 

It is also said here that McNab 
has denied the report that he was 
interested in financing Arbuckle. 



In New York the report is dis- 
credited. 

The Hays Committee on Public 
Relations in a resolution adopted 
Thursday disapproves of Arbuckle 
pictures being shown. 




Johnny Hines, Doris Kenyon and Robert Edeson in one of the peppy 
scenes from "Sure Fire Flint." Presented by Mastodon Films, Inc., this 
C. C. Burr production has been the talk of Broadway during its engage- 
ment at B. S. Moss' Cameo theatre this week. — Advt. 



Pre-Release Showing 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Newark — "The Plaything of an 
Emperor," Jesse A. Levinson release, 
being distributed through Independ- 
ent Exchanges, opens today at the 
Paramount for a pre-release run, 



' 



$40,000 For "Masked Woman" 
It is reported that A. H. Woods 
has received six offers for the motion 
picture rights of "The Masked 
Woman." the highest offer being 
$40,000. 

Woods says he will invite pro- 
ducers to his next opening and auc- 
tion the play off the stage. 



M. P. D. A. Officers 
At the last meeting of the Ne 
York Lodge M. P. D. A., the follow- 
ing officers were elected for the en- 
suing year: 

Director, Kenneth Webb; Assist- 
ant Director, Geo. Irving; Technical 
Director. John W. Noble; Treasurer, 
C. Jay Williams (reelected); Secre- 
tary. William F. Haddock, (re- 
elected); Inner Guard, Oscar Lund; 
Outer Guard, Joseph Richmond: 
Trustee for three years, J. Searle 
Dawley. 



oldwyn Gets "Merry Widow" 
Goldwyn has purchased the picture 
rights of "The Merry Widow." Von 
Stroheim will probably direct. 



"Willat With Technicolor" 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Boston — "Doc." Willat, one of the 
best known of the old-time pioneers, 
has shown up in Boston where he 
will stay for some time to come. Doc 
is the practical mechanical chief of 
Technicolor, being the link between 
the scientific theorists in the com- 
pany and the theater screen actuality. 



w 1; 



Big Business at Capitol 

"The Stranger's Banquet," Neilan's 
latest, is reported to have broken all 
records at the Capitol this week with 
the exception of "Passion," which 
did about $53,000 the first week of 
its run. The Neilan picture would 
have been held over had it not been 
for a series of bookings, which would 
not permit of extension. The book- 
ing condition at the Capitol has re- 
sulted in "Robin Hood" being de- 
layed from Jan. 21 to Jan. 28. There 
is some talk of bringing "The 
Stranger's Banquet" back later. 



Off On Mission 

Sidney Garrett ^ails for London for 
Associated Exhibitors and 
Other Matters 
Sidney Grrrett. of Inter-Globe Ex- 
port, sails today on the Majestic for 
London. While there he will look 
into several matters of importance 
regarding Associated Exhibitors pro- 
duct, and will also take up with Ideal 
Films and Gaumont (Bromhead's) 
several productions so far as the 
American rights are concerned. One 
of these is the Ideal production of 
"Harbor Lights." made by Tom Ter- 
riss and featuring Tom Moore, and 
the other "The Hawk," in which 
Charles Hutcheson is starred. The 
Bromhead's now have Terriss under 
contract for a special which, it is 
said, will be made in Egypt, and for 
which a number of important Ameri- 
can stars are being secured. Gar- 
rett signed Wanda Hawley for one 
of the leading parts just before sail- 
ing. He will be away about six 
weeks. 



In Russia 

Producing and Distributing Arrange- 
ments Weak — Fox and Para- 
mount Popular 

According to Charles Recht. Soviet 
attorney here, picture conditions in 
Russia are very promising. 

A special government department, 
the "Photo-Kino." headed by Liber- 
mann, a former engineer, has been 
formed to foster and encourage the 
industry. Every picture shown or 
made in Russia must be licensed by 
this bureau. There are four produc- 
ing companies. Moskwa. Russ. 
Screen, and Fakel. engaged in mak- 
fContinued on Pape 2) 



It's a Business 

F. B. O. is claiming a record 
for booking the smallest the- 
ater in the country. A report 
from a Los Angeles salesman 
shows that he recently sold a 
contract to the Simpson theater, 
with a post office address of 
Niland, Cal. This theater 
stands out on the prairie a mile 
and a auarter from the nearest 
habitation. The total popula- 
tion is two consisting of Mr. 
and Mrs. Simpson. The rest 
of the audience is drawn from 
the farmers and ranchmen 
within a radius of 20 miles — all 
of whom are forced to cross a 
mile and a nuarter of the Im- 
perial Valley desert before 
reaching this unique "neighbor- 
hood" house. 



THE 



■£*?k 



DAILV 



Saturday, January 6, 1923 




Vol. XXIII in. 5 Saturday, Jan. 6. 1923 Price 5 Cents 



Copyright 1922, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc.. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y.. by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor; 
J. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager ; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
ot Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00- .- months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00, Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY. 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 
CI '>ago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau. Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
vakia), Wenzelsplatz. 






Quotations 

High low Close Sale* 

East. Kod. 94>S 93^ 94 1.700 

F. P.-L. .. 91 K 90K> 90^ 3,000 

. do pfd. . 98-ys 98^4 9&V& 100 

f G'wyn ... 6'/, 5% 6 3,000 

(jriHith Not quoted 

Loew's ... im 19'A 195/6 1,000 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 



Bachman Due 

Jack Bachmann of the Al Licht- 
man organization, is due in Monday 
from the Coast. 



Briefs Filed 

Briefs will be filed in the "Peek- 
skill" case on Monday. 



Craver Here 
R. D. Craver of Charlotte, N. C. 
is in town for a few days. 



Off Cn Vacation 
Al Kaufman, Famous Players, ac- 
companicd by his wife, leaves tomor- 
row for Palm Beach for a vacation. 
Future plans unsettled. 



Fields Leaving Fox 
Harry Fields who has been con- 
nected for a long time with the Fox 
organization will join United Artists 
on Monday. 



Censorship Fees 

Since August 1, 1921, when the 
New York State Motion Picture 
Commission started, it has collected 
$307,000 for censoring pictures. 

During the same period the Com- 
mission has spent approximately 
$116,000, according to Chairman 
George II Cobb. There have been 
made about 5.001) eliminations and 
l>ss than 100 pictures have been con- 
demned in their entirety. 



I -(( (QcluxuitLcrricii U'CctuAjL^ 



I 



Baxter Here 

L. L. Baxter, business manager for 
Marshall Neilan, is in town for a 
few days. 



"Robin Hood" Run Closes 
Douglas Fairbank's "Robin Hood" 
will end its long engagement at the 
Lyric tomorrow night. 



Harry Warner Returning 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Hollywood — H. M. Warner and 
his wife are expect' \ to leave here 
today for New York. 



Mintz Closes Deal 

M. J. Mintz, of the Cameo Music 
Pub. Co., has ' losed negotiations with 
Famous Players for the adoption of 
his thematic music cue sheet in their 
houses. 



Duncan's Due 

William Duncan and his wife Edith 
Johnson, are expected in from the 
Coast soon. Upon the completion of 
the present Vitagraph contract it is 
said Duncan will make serials. 



Chaplin To Make Record 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Charlie Chaplin has 
closed a contract with The Bruns- 
wick Phonograph Co., to make a 
record when he goes to New York 
next spring. He will receive $10,000 
in addition to 10 per cent royalty. 



Sistrom To Coast 

William Sistrom, Western produc- 
tion manager for Cosmopolitan, has 
returned to the Coast. He will im- 
mediately start work on F. R. 
Adams, ' "The Love Piker" and 
"Mother McGinn," by Jack Doyle. 
Frances Marion will direct "The 
Love Piker" and E. Mason Hopper, 
the latter. 



Pierson Going to the Orient 
H. Wayne Pierson, assistant Gen- 
eral Manager of the foreign depart- 
ment of United Artists, will sail from 
Seattle on Jan. 14th, for the Orient 
on a tour of inspection of the foreign 
offices. His first stop will be at 
Tokio. His itinerary will include 
Russia, Japan, China, the Strait 
Settlements, Philippine Island, India, 
South Africa, Egypt and Australia. 



Gianninni Dined 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Hollywood — Joe Schenck and Sol 
Lesser were hosts at a luncheon tend- 
ered at the Ambassador to Dr. A. H. 
Gianinni, prior to his departure _ for 
the East. The Doctor again voiced 
his well known objections to bonuses 
paid for loans from banks and bank- 
ers. Among those present were Mack 
Sennett, Thomas H. Ince, Abraham 
Lebf, J. F. Godsol, J. D. Williams, 
Sam Katz, M. C. Levee, Ben P. 
Schulberg, A. L. Gore, Adolph Ram- 
ish, Michael Gore, Irving M. Lesser, 
Michael Rosenberg, Marco Hellman. 
Jack Coogan Senior, Sid Grauman, 
Jack, Sam, and Harry Warner, J. G. 
Bachman, George Lichtenberger, Sam 
Goldwyn, John GcCormick, A. L. 
Bernstein, Montague Glass, Edwin 
Carcwe and Harry D. W r ilson. 



In Russia 



(Continued from Page 1) 

ing pictures now. The last of these, 
Fakel. is also a distributing concern. 
While producing is going on at an 
encouraging rate, because of govern- 
ment aid, and the plethora of artists 
and actors at liberty, distribution is 
quite another matter. On account of 
the size of Russia, the scattered loca- 
tions of the houses, and poor trans- 
portation facilities, this is quite a 
difficult task. The government de- 
partment is lending as much aid as 
possible, while local distributing con- 
cerns, such as the Northwestern, are 
trying to meet the problem locally. 
In addition to studios, laboratories 
are being erected; foreign experts 
being employed largely for this pur- 
pose. All this work is under govern- 
ment supervision and control; but 
the government is not financially in- 
terested in the companies. The 
Russians have as their favorite star 
an Armenian, Moisse, who starred in 
a Russian moledramatic production, 
'Father Sergius," which was com- 
pleted about a year ago. The big 
German feature, "Lady Hamilton" is 
a favorite Russian film; as is every 
Chaplin picture yet shown there. 
"Lady Hamilton" was bought by a 
Russian for a sum equalling $800 in 
American money. Fox and Para- 
mount pictures are seen very fre- 
quently. The more melodramatic 
pictures are the better they are liked. 
Admissions scale from 5 to 25 cents. 



Forbes Forecast 

B. C. Forbes, in Forbes 
Magazine, forecasting 1923, 
says in part: 

"Frankly, I hesitate to set 
down how doubtful I feel over 
what unwise action may cause 
in the second half of 1923. We 
have most of the elements and 
materials for the making of 
prosperity. But I am not at all 
sure that these elements and 
materials may not be mis- 
handled — mishandled interna- 
tionally by European and 
American statesmen; mishandl- 
ed at home politically by the 
radicals in Congress; mis- 
handled by industrial and other 
corporations overanxious to 
mark up prices unduly; mis- 
handled by labor leaders 
blindly rather than prudently 
intent upon forcing up wages. 

"If I were to confine my 
forecast to the opening months 
of 1923, I would predict, with 
a fair degree of confidence, a 
continuation of the improving 
trend which has been under 
way for months. * * * 

"But when I try, as I have 
tried most earnestly and per- 
sistently, to read the outlook 
for the second half of the year, 
I confess that so many ques- 
tions and questionings enter my 
mind that I hesitate to make 
any definite prediction one way 
or other. I am sorry to have 
to say that the scales threaten 
to be tipped towards the un- 
favorable rather than the fav- 
orable side. * * * " 



Southwestern Notes 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Dallas — E. S. Lowery, formerly 
read man for Paramount has joined 
Hodkinson. 



Alpine, Tex. — C. D. Stewart has 
taken over the management of the 
Mojave. 






Rusk, Texas — Eugene Kennedy, 
formerly manager of the Palace, Tyler 
has taken over the Jewel. 



Bartlesville, Okla. — Mr. Chandler 
has taken over the management of the 
Cutler theaters. 



Pittsburgh — Maurice Geiger has re- 
signed from the Famous Players- 
Lasky office here and will travel Ohio 
for United Artists. 



$5,000.00 to $10,000.00 

wanted to close quick expansion 
opportunity offered established small 
but successful motion picture pro- 
ducing Company 

HANDLE YOUR OWN MONEY 

Write 

Box S I c/o The Film Daily 

71 West 44th Street New York 

WANTED 

Experienced laboratory manager for 
plant in East. Must be good 
mechanic and know service require- 
ments film industry. Give full de- 
tails, first letter as to age, experience, 
salary desired, etc. Address Box 
AA— Film Daily, New York. 



CHAS. 0. BAUMANN, 



Pre*. 



RESOURCES - $5,000,000 
— LEGAL RATES — 



PRODUCERS & STARS 

represented. Also every form of 
financial service rendered in connec- 
tion therewith — at legal rates. 



GREAT NORTHERN FINANCE CORP. 
Knickerbocker Building 

Broadway at 42nd Street, N. Y. City 
Telephone Bryant 2989 



NEGATIVE TITLES 

10 cents per foot, including cards. 
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m 



Saturday, January 6, 1923 




PatheNews 

No. 3 
FIRST AND EXCLUSIVE PICTURES OF 
FAMOUS EGYPTIAN TOMB JUST DIS- 
COVERED — Patho News presents first and 
exclusive pictures of the tomb rot King 
Tutankhamen recently discovered, which is a 
treasure house of enormous value and the 
greatest archaeological find ever made. 

ALLIED CONFERENCE OF PREMIERS 
BREAKS ON REPARATIONS— Paris con- 
ference breaks up with opinions at a deadlock. 

COUE ARRIVES — Famous advocate of 
autosuggestion arrives in New York for 
lecture tour. 

Other news as usual. 

THE FIRST NEWS REEL 
THE REAL NEWS FIRST 

today 



Managerial Changes 

Baltimore, Md. — Joseph Robbins 
is managing the Gilmore here. 

Erie, Pa. — J. E. Rainey has re- 
signed as manager of the Rialto. 



Pittsburgh — Louis Michaels is man- 
ager of the newly enlarged Liberty on 
the south side here. 



Austin, Tex.— E. B. Roberts of 
Dallas has been appointed manager 
ol the Elite. 



Bristol, Conn. — Walley Griffith, 
formerly with S. Z. Poli in Water- 
bury, is managing the Poli house here. 

Kansas City, Mc.-W. L. Mc- 
Dowell has sold the Bancroft to L. 
A. Wallace. 



Stroudsburg, Pa.— L. A. Wolfsohn, 
former proprietor of the Strand, has 
Iuised the New Tuscan in Brooklyn. 



Live Oak, Fla.— C. C. Price has 
taken over Lon Burton's theater at 
Live Oak. Price has the Royal, at 
Tarpon Springs. 



Macon, Mo. — The Princess has 
been purchased by the Illmo Amuse- 
ment Co. Wallace Akin will be 
manager. 



Hartford, Conn.— Fred A. Valles of 
the local Poli Theater has been trans- 
ferred to the new Palace in Bridge- 
port. W. J. Cotter succeeds Valles. 

St. Louis — Barney Rosenthal, resi- 
dent manager for Universal has 
named David Ittsel as manager of 
the Rivoli. For several years Ittsel 
was in charge of the State Lake, 
Chicago. 



Sioux City, la.— Frank Wood, 
former manager of the Princess here, 
and recently Fox exploitation man, is 
associated with J. C. Duncan in man- 
aging the Plaza and Royal, owned by 
the Hostettler Amusement Co. of 
Omaha. 



Steamer Sailings 

Sailing of steamers for foreign 
ports, with time of sailings, destina- 
tions and points for which they carry 
mail are as follows: 

Today 

Majestic sails at 12 M. for Southampton; 
mails close at 8 A. M. for Europe, Africa 
and West Asia, (Norway, specially address- 
ed). Adriatic sails at 7 A. M. for Liverpool; 
mails close at 4.30 A. M. for Madeira and 
Gibraltar, (Italy and Greece, specially ad- 
dressed). Dorothy sails at 11 A. M. for 
Barahona ; mails close at 8.30 A. M. for 
Dominican Republic. Noordam sails at 11 
A. M. for Rotterdam ; mails close at 7 A. 
M. for Europe, Africa and West Asia, 
(Specially addressed). United States sails at 
12 M. for Copenhagen; mails close at 9 A. 
M. for Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Fin- 
land, (Specially addressed). Tartar Prince 
sails at 2 P. M. for Cape Town ; mails close 
at 12 M. for South Africa, (Specially ad- 
dressed). Fort St. George sails at 11 A. 
M. for Hamilton ; mails close at 7.30 A. M. 
for Bermuda, Montserrat and Guiana. Ori- 
zaba sails at 11 A. M. for Havana; mails 
close at 8 A. M. for Cuba, (Specially ad- 
dressed). Zulia sails at 12 M. for La Guayrz; 
mails close at 8.30 for Curacao, (Specially 
addressed). Ponce sails at 12 M. for San 
Juan; mails close at 8.30 A. M. for Porto 
Rico, Virgin Islands and Santo Domingo 
City. Araguaya sails at 11 A. M. for Hamil- 
ton, mails close at 9 A. M. for Bermuda. 
Pastores sails at 12 M. for Port Limon ; 
mails close at 9 A. M. for Costa Rica, (Cuba, 
Jamaica, Canal Zone and Panama, Specially 
addressed). Southern Cross sails at 12 M. 
for Buenos Ayres ; mails close at 10 A. M. 
for South Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay and 
Paraguay. Martinique sails at 2 P. M. for 
Barbados; mails close at 12 M. for Virgin 
Islands and West Indies. (Guiana, St. 

Vincent, and Trinidad, specially addressed). 

Monday 

Aidan sails at 2 P. M. for Rio Janeiro; 
mails close at 11 A. M. for Pernambucco, 
Parahyba, Natal and Maceio, (Other Parts 
of Brazil, specially addressed). Haiti sails 
at 3 P. M. for Port au Prince; mails close 
at 1.30 P. M. for Haiti. 

Tuesday 

Rochambeau sails at 10 A. M. for Havre; 
mails close at 7.30 for France, (other coun- 
tries must be specially addressed). Samland 
sails at 12 M. for Antwerp; mails close at 
9.30 A. M. for Belgium and Luxemberg. 
(Specially addressed). Florinda sails at 12 
M. for Barcelona; mails close at 9 A. M. for 
Spain, (Specially addressed only). Canada 
sails at 2 P M. for Piraeus; mails close 
11.30 A M. 'for Syria and Palestine, (Italy 
and Greece must be specially addressed). 
Matura sails at 11 A. M. for Grenada; mails 
close at 8 A. M. for Grenada, St. Vincent, 
Trinidad, Ciudada, Bolivar and Guiana. Inca 
sails at 12 M. for Puerta Plata; mails close 
at 9.30 A. M. for Puerta Plata, San Pedro 
do Macoris and Santo Domingo City. 



Bradley Supervising Manager 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Minneapolis— Charles J. Bradley, 
Finkelstein & Ruben publicity direc- 
tor, will act as supervising manager 
and will be in charge of house policy, 
exploitation, publicity and advertising 
oi all F-R houses. 



F. B. O.'s New Star 
F. B. O. announce that they have 
purchased screen rights to "Born of 
the Cyclone," the play by Charles B. 
Stillson and Charles Berham, dealing 
with gypsy life, for their new star, 
now called Derelys Perdue; but 
whose new professional name is not 
decided. They have also purchased 
three other stories for early produc- 
tion: "Vallev of the Giants" a Rob- 
erts Wells Richie novel that appeared 
in the Country Gentleman; "Judith 
of Bohemia," bv Corelic Stanton and 
Heath Hosken, that appeared in 
Munsey's; and "Jerry Comes Home" 
a newspaper play by Roy Briant. 



Paramount's Tasmanian Office 
Paramount has opened a branch in 
Launceston, Tasmania. 



M. P. T. O. Zone Meeting 
A zone meeting of the M. P. T. O. 
of Eastern Pennsylvania, Southern 
New Jersey, and Delaware will be 
held at Shamokin January 14. 

Cameramen Unite 
Herman O.' Brock and Seymour 
Spiegel, cameramen, have united for 
the manufacturing of industrial and 
commercial films at 727 7th Ave. 



Gordon Gets Another 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Boston — Nathan Gordon has added 
the Codman Square, Dorchester, to 
his string. This is a 2,000 seat house, 
and the acquisition eliminates com- 
petition to his Strand, in Dorchester. 



Illinois Notes 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Linden, III. — A house has just been 
opened here by Mrs. Maxwell. 



Moline, 111.— The Le Claire, which 
cost $250,000, will soon open. 



Moline. 111.— The Valley Amuse- 
ment Co. has changed its name to 
the Des Moines Orpheum Co. 



Alton, 111. — The Onatoga has open- 
ed under the management of M. 
Holland. 



Peoria, 111.— Milton Hirsch has 
been appointed manager of the Para- 
mount branch here. 



Waukegan, 111. — Carl Mueller has 
been appointed manager of the Elite, 
owned by Edward Trina. 



a tempo 




Sung by Two Generations 

"LOVE'S OLD SWEET SONG" 

A Great Box-Office Title - 
A LUND PRODUCTION 

NORCA PICTURES, Inc. 1540 Broadway, N. Y. C. 



l!ll!llllllllilllilllll[!|||l!!lll!llllll!!lll!P!l!llll!lllli:!l!^ 



I KNOW EVERY DAY 
| ALL THE NEWS 

| OF THE 

I PICTURE BUSINESS 



The "Film Daily 

71 West 44th St., New York City 

Kindly enter my subscription to The Film Daily for 
one year, starting immediately, to include 

THE FILM DAILY— 313 Issues— Every Day 
Including Weekly Reviews— 52 Issues 
1922 Year Book— Cloth Bound— 500 pages 

Subscription.. $10— Foreign, $15 



1 Name 

| Theatre 

| Address 

|i m iiiiiiiiiiniiiliiffliilMiwiffir" l " l ""^ l °" MI ' ww °^ ff " 11 " 1 "" 1 mm mHtHiiiiuiiiiiiiiJiuuimiiJiuiiiJurriuniiHirnHiiJJifHfiiiiiiiiiiiiJiJiiiiJUHiJimiJi«i//^ 



THE 



Putting It Over 



iS&H 



DAILY 



Saturday, January 6, 1923 



Here is how a brother exhibitor put his show over. Send along 
vour ideas. Let the other fellow know how you cleaned up. 



Mary Carr Double Helps 

Youngstown, O. — A simple stunt 
that netted all sorts of publicity as 
well as increased dollars to the Park 
during the showing of "Silver Wings" 
was the one inaugurated by Manager 
Joe Shagrin who secured the services 
of a lady who resembled Mary Carr 
and who dressed in similar clothes. 
Three days before the opening she 
walked through the principal streets 
of Youngstown giving away small 
handkerchiefs which contained the in- 
scription: "See Mary Carr in 'Silver 
Wings' at the Park Theater starting 
Sunday." So great were the requests 
for these souvenirs, that police were 
used to hold the crowd in check. 



Merchants Tie-up With "Confidence" 

San Francisco ■ — Ben Westland, 
Universal exploiteer here seized upon 
the title of the Herbert Rawlinson 
picture playing at the Frolic for an 
advertising tie-up. The picture was 
called "Confidence" and Westland 
ccnvinced three big San Francisco 
merchants that Confidence meant a 
lot in their business. One was a big 
music store and the others clothing 

gteres. 

Each of the stores took a quarter- 
pp.ge ad, which together with the 
Frolic ad for "Confidence" made up a 
page lay-out in the San Francisco 
Daily News. A big streamer across 
the top of the page announced "The 
merchants below merit your 'Confi- 
dence' both for quality of merchan- 
dise and for price." The word "Con- 
fidence" was featured at the top of 
each ad. The merchants were de- 
lighted at the opportunity to tie-up 
with such a good-will establishing dis- 
play. 



Ties Up With Newly-weds 

Lawrence, Mass. — Fred Demara 
of the Palace believes the love-stuff 
is sure-fire after a couple has just 
hooked-up, so he established a 
"Newly-Weds Night" for the run of 
"The Impossible Mrs. Bellew." He 

secured a list of the month's marriages 
from the County Clerk, numbering 
104. Passes were sent to all of them 
and 97 showed up. The newly-weds 
raved over a picture of true love, and 
the next day the receipts took a jump. 



Insures "Monte Cristo" 

Charleston — As the result of an ex- 
ploitation campaign conducted by the 
Capitol, during the recent showing of 
"Monte Cristo," the leading news- 
paper of the city carried a three col- 
umn photograph and story, part of 
which follows: 

"The picture. 'Monte Cristo' is the 
first that has ever been insured in 
Charleston. The management of the 
Capitol, realizing the value of the 
films, and taking into consideration 
the expense to which they were going 
to get it, have followed in the line of 
many other amusement places, and 
t;iken out a policy for $50,000, insur- 
ing the films against loss by theft or 
any other manner. There have been 
but few copies of the picture made, 
and the showing in Charleston is 
the first outside of New York where 
i*. is now playing. 

"The firm of Patterson, Bell and 
Crane, through H. B. Littaker, their 
agent issued the policy, and one of 
the clauses called for an armed guard 
to accompany the film from the sta- 
tion to the theater." 



Poppies and Carts 

Newark, N. J. — Three city snrinkl- 
ing carts were used tc exploit the 
Strand by Manager O'Crowley and 
showing of "The Sin Flood," at the 
W. R. Ferguson, Goldwyn exploi- 
tation man. 

On the rear end of each cart was 
a big sign reading: "The Sin Flood" 
will sweep you away at the Strand. 
The carts covered most of the busi- 
ness section of the city and carried 
the signs for several days. The stunt 
was a simple one but proved one 
ol the best attention-getters the 
Jersey town had seen during the 
season. 



Perilous Situation Contest 

Charleston, W. Va. — A new slant 
on a newspaper contest for "The Sin 
Flood," was used by the manager of 
the Capitol. He arranged with the 
Charleston Gazette to run the con- 
test. The first prize was five dollars 
in gold, the second a two months' 
pass to the Capitol, other prizes being 
two tickets each to "The Sin Flood." 

The prizes were offered for the best 
250-word essays on the most perilous 
situation ever faced by the writers. 
More than 100 replies were received 
each day. 

The winning essays were published 
in the Gazette daily and stimulated 
attendance. 



"Lorna Doone" in Many Windows 

New York- — A new record for win- 
dew tie ups was established during 
the run of "Lorna Doone" at the 
Strand here according to the check 
up made by the Ince offices. More 
than 3,000 windows were secured. 
Here's the list: I. Miller gave a dis- 
play on Madge Bellamy shoes; F. O. 
A. Schwarz tied up on the Lorna 
Doone book; Gimbel's dressed a win- 
dow on the Lorna Doone hat; The 
New York Manufacturing Retail 
store gave another window on the 
hat; Wanamaker's gave a window on 
the hat, dress, umbrella and coat; 
Maurice Mendal shops gave a win- 
dow on the coat; Macy's used the 
umbrella for a window; Seven wo- 
men's specialty shops carried displays 
on the Lorna Doone dress; 75 win- 
dows featured the Lorna Doone song 
and 2,000 windows displayed the 
Lorna Doone Biscuit manufactured 
by the National Biscuit Co. 



ELMER PEARSON 



Do You Want 

Success 

For 1923 

? 



Every Exhibitor 
Wants It 



VOL. XXIII No. 6 





Sunday, January 7, 1923 



Price 25 Cents 




GarlLae: 



presen: 



■ 




<fhe Flame o 




aso 



amous ilov\ 



>I^Ull 



Universal - Jevel hobart Henley prodt/ctign 



A 



O C I 



A T E D 

ARTHUR S. KANE, 



E X H 

PRESIDENT. 



I B I T O Ro S 





Ideal lilm hctur 
pre 




EVERY prediction has been fulfilled. 
Constance Binney in "A Bill of 



Divorcement" 
tainment. 



is 



superb enter- 



In dramatic strength it even exceeds 
the power of the stage play which amazed 
New York, startled London and in Chi- 
cago lived up to its reputation as one of 
the biggest hits of 1921-1922. 

Joe Dannenberg of Film Daily saw the 
feature and wrote "A fine picture — one 
that is going to start them talking because 
of the wallop it contains. For sheer dra- 
matic entertainment it can hardly be 
surpassed." 

The National Board of Review (Excep- 
tional Photoplays, November, 1922) de- 
clares, "It has an essential merit deserv- 
ing of wide appreciation." 

Constance Binney's work is simply 
amazing. Her exquisite beauty lends an 
appealing background to her poignant 
interpretation of a daughter who sacrifices 
her own future for the happiness of a 
divorced mother and the salvation of a 
lonely father. 

Fay Compton, Malcolm Keen, Henry 
Victor and others complete "an excep- 
tionally capable and well suited cast and 
all credit is due Denison Clift, who made 
the picture," to again quote Film Daily. 

Associated Exhibitors proudly pro- 
claims Constance Binney in "A Bill of 
Divorcement," combining the name of an 
alluring star with the fame of a great 
stage play, as an emotionally perfect 
photoplay and a genuine first run 
attraction. 




ofU ranee v (jinneu 

A Bill Of Divorcement 

(NATIONALLY ADVERTISED) 

From Clemence Danes Terrific Stage Hit Of 1921-1922 A Denison Clift Art Production- 



m 



Physical Distributors 



Pathe Exchange 

INC 



ZftfBftADSTREET 
oSFILMDOH 




Vol. XXIII No. 6 Sunday, Jan, 7, 1923 Price 25c. 

Copyright, 1922, Wid's Film and Film Folks, Inc. 

Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., New York, N. Y., by 
WID'S FILM AND FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; J. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and 
Business Manager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, at the post office at 
New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free), United States, Outside of Greater New York. 
$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, $15.00 
Subscribers should remit with order. 

Address all communications to THE FILM DAILY, 71-/3 West 44th St., 

New York, N. Y. Telephone, Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5558. 
Hollywood, California: Harvey E. Gausman, 6411 Hollywood Blvd. Phone, 

Hollywood 1603. 
Chicago Representative: Irving Mack, 808 South Wabash Ave. 

London Representative: Ernest W. Fredman, The Film Renter, 53a Shaftes- 
bury Ave., London, W 1. 

Paris Representative. Le Film, 42, Rue de Clichy. 

Central European Representative : Internationale Filroschau, Prague 
(Czecho-Slovakia), Wenzelsplatz. 



Features Reviewed 

Nazimova in SALOME 

Allied Artists Page 2 

Marshall Neilan's. .THE STRANGERS' BANQUET 
Goldwyn Page 3 

THE FACE ON THE BARROOM FLOOR 
Fox Page 5 



Universal 



THE POWER OF A LIE 
Page 8 



Gloria Swanson in MY AMERICAN WIFE 

Paramount Page 9 

Edward Sloman presents THE LAST HOUR 

Mastodon Films, Inc. — State Rights Page 13 

Short Reels Page 15 



News of the Week 
in Headlines 



Holiday. 



Monday 



Tuesday 



Harry B. Rosen, chairman of the executive committee 
of the Harriman Nat'l Bank, and interested in pic- 
tures, died after a day's illness of pneumonia. 

David R. Hochreith cancels his "Prosperity Dinner." 
scheduled for Jan. 11th at the Astor. 

Theater Owner's Dist. Corp. elects officers and opens 
offices in the same building where the M. P. T. O. A. 
has headquarters. 

Wednesday 

"Merton of the Movies" may be used by Glenn Hun- 
ter, now starring in the stage version, on the screen. 

Will Hays is back from Hollywood and is confident 
of cooperation and understanding in the coast centre. 

Associated Booking Corp. (A. B. C.) will not attempt 
to organize nationally. 

According to Government tax figures business shows 
improvement for November. 

Thursday 

Gov. Smith in his message to the legislature recom- 
mends the repeal of the censorship act. 

Stoll Film Co., London, declared a dividend of 5 per 
cent. 

Friday 

Deal involving millions by which Famous takes over 
the Lynch organization consummated. Famous will 
retain the former staff practically intact, and Lynch. 
who will retire from the picture business, remains 
one of the largest stockholders in Famous Players. 

Reported that Sam Goldwyn will give George Fitz- 
maurice $100,000 a year and 50 per cent of tin- profits 
from his productions. 

Metro relinquishes the Aldine, in Philadelphia. 

Hodkinson secures Elmer Clifton's "Down to the Sea 
in Ships." 

Saturday 

Sidney Garrett, Inter-Globe Export, sails for London 
for Assoc. Exhibitors. Will take up several other 
important matters. 

Havs issues statement relative to Arbuckle situation, 
says question must be left entirely to public. 



"Pardoning the bad is injuring the good:*— Benjamin Franklin. 






I 



-. &&*\ 



DAILV 



Sunday, January 7, 1923 



Splendid Production Values But No K ick in Nazimova's "Salome" 



Nazimova in 

"SALOME" 

Allied Artists 

DIRECTOR Charles Bryant 

MJTHOR Oscar Wilde 

SCENARIO BY Peter M. Winters 

CAMERAMAN Charles Van Enger 

AS A WHOLE An artistic, somewhat daring 

and unusual production. May be difficult to 
put over as a financial success 

STORY Oscar Wilde's conception of Herod's 

daughter given remarkably unusual treatment. 
Not the character known in opera 

DIRECTION A bizarre conception of an un- 
usual characterization 

PHOTOGRAPHY Excellent 

LIGHTINGS Splendid 

STAR Still her unusual and artistic self. Gives 

a splendid performance 

SUPPORT Satisfying; Mitchell Lewis excellent 

as Herod, Nigel de Brulier very good as John. 
Others unimportant 

EXTERIORS Practically none 

INTERIORS Artistic; unusual. Designed by 

Natacha Rambova after Aubrey Beardsley's 
quaintly clever original drawings 

DETAIL Fair. Famous dance of seven veils 

not particularly thrilling 

CHARACTER OF STORY They've tamed it 

down a lot. Any sixteen year old girl can see 
it with safety 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 5,000 feet 

When Oscar Wilde wrote his version of the story 



of Herod's daughter and her voluptuous, passionate 
desires for John he used enough descriptive words to 
make very clear just what Salome was. When the 
opera was produced the big kick came in the tremen- 
dous passion with which Salome kissed the lips of the 
dead John who in life had scorned her love. 

Alia Nazimova, always a great artist and always 
different, stands out supreme in her desire to do 
things her own way in the conception of the 
naive, sweet and childlike Salome which she 
presents in a production of rare artistic value. The 
Nazimova Salome is an imperious, self-willed child. 
She pouts and contorts her body in a gesture of 
supreme indifference even at the death of the hand- 
some Captain of the Guard who loves her. She ex- 
hibits no particular pulsating passion for John, rather 
that of a spoiled child who, because she cannot get 
what she wants, cares nothing for what else happens. 
It is rather the selfish feeling of an adolescent than 
the fully developed passion of a woman that Nazimova 
portrays. 

What was naturally expected to be a daring bit — 
the dance of the seven veils — is an extremely tame 
though artistic performance. If anyone in the audi- 
ence was one-tenth as shocked as the banquet attend- 
ance on the screen appear they failed to show it. 

Whether or not there is sufficient interest among 
the public to take to "Salome" remains to be seen. 
From a production viewpoint it is more than could 
be normally desired and artistic in the extreme. The 
star's work is excellent and there is an ample display of 
her boyish figure. The cast has little to do. 



For the "Artistic" Crowd Yes— For Others Figure It Out 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Here is a fine artistic production with a wellknown 
star. You know what an artistic production means to 
your clientele. If you happen to cater to this sort of 
a crowd, you can get this one by safely, but if you 
haven't such a crowd you had better s,ee this and 
figure it out carefully. Many of the so called thrilling 

bits naturally to be expected in a production of 
"Salome" are missing. There isn't any wonderful 
dance of the seven veils and the love anguish of 



Salome over the lips of her dead lover carries little or 
no punch. 

Of course if your people know, or if you want to 
tell them what the famous Oscar Wilde story is all 
about, it will undoubtedly create a certain amount of 
interest. But be careful of your promises other than 
that it is one of the most unusual and most artistic 
productions of the year. It is all of that, the only 
question is whether or not it has sufficient box office 
value to you. 



Sunday, January 7, 1923 




Drama That Offers Variety of Appeal and Has Been Excellently Produced 



Marshall Neilan's production 

"THE STRANGERS' BANQUET" 

Goldwyn 

DIRECTORS.... Marshall Neilan and Frank Urson 

AUTHOR Donn Byrne 

SCENARIO BY Marshall Neilan and Frank 

Urson 

CAMERAMAN David Kesson 

AS A WHOLE Contains many good exploita- 
tion angles and points of appeal; will please a 
good majority 

STORY Has an unusual angle — too much of it 

for one feature 
DIRECTION At times very good and distinc- 
tive; gets away from the commonplace; often 
interrupts the continuity 

PHOTOGRAPHY Good 

LIGHTINGS Good 

PLAYERS A long list of particularly efficient 

and pleasing players including many prominent 
names such as Hobart Bosworth, Claire Wind- 
sor, Rockliffe Fellowes, Ford Sterling, Eleanor 
Boardman and Thomas Holding 

EXTERIORS Suitable 

INTERIORS Many of them attractive 

DETAIL Fair 

CHARACTER OF STORY The conflict of capi- 
tal and labor with a girl managing the ship 
yards of her late father and quelling the spirit 
of unrest 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 8,153 feet 

Regardless of what may be said either for or against 
"The Strangers' Banquet" as a production, it is very 
likely that it will "take" with the average audience 
because there is such a wealth of varying incident and 
novel situations in it, and, on the whole, Marshall 
Neilan has made a very interesting picture as far as its 
individuality is concerned. It does get away from the 
usual routine of screen entertainment and the many 
odds and ends of audience appeal which Neilan has 
injected, make it worthy of special consideration. 



The picture has one weakness, however, that doesn't 
fail to attract your attention and that is in lC e. 

Strange as it may seem the difficulty seen, 
been that Donn Byrne's story contained more material 
than they could comprehensively work into one feat- 
ure even considering that Neilan's picture runs o 
eight reels. The plot becomes highly involved and 
complicated and in his desire to supply the varieU 
atmosphere and incident which the theme embrai 
Neilan interrupts the continuity with the result thai 
the spectator is frequently confused and it tak( 
little while for him to catch up with the progress of the 
plot. There are also obvious evidences of a not over 
precautious editing. The insertion of titles written in 
plainer language would help to clarify matters con- 
siderably at times. 

Neilan has assembled an unusually notable cast 
composed of many well known and capable players. 
Claire Windsor is very attractive and does very good 
work in the chief feminine role. Rockliffe Fellowes 
is especially well suited as Angus Campbell and there 
is a long list of others. Among those not previously 
mentioned are Eugenia Besserer, Nigel Barrie, Stuart 
Holmes, Claude Gillingwater, Tom Guise, Cyril Chad- 
wick, Philo McCullough and Arthur Hoyt. It is un- 
deniably a splendid company. 

There is considerable that is convincing in the 
theme in connection with the conflict of labor and 
capital. It requires numerous sub-titles but Neilan 
also injects a good deal of force into the situations and 
there are other equally noticeable deft touches that 
mark him as a director of ability. A few of his clever, 
but somewhat indelicate, "touches" may cause some 
comment where they aren't "over their heads." It is 
mostly suggestion, but quite obvious. 

The story is too complicated and could hardly be 
done justice in a brief synopsis but it can be recom- 
mended for those who like something a little different 
with an attractive combination of entertaining ele- 
ments. 



Worth Careful Exploitation and Should Do a Good Business 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



"The Strangers' Banquet" is Marshall Neilan's first 
production under the Goldwyn banner and, all told, is 
a rather auspicious introduction. Undoubtedly Neil- 
an's production will prove a satisfying box office at- 
traction because of the entertainment values which it 
contains and the variety of angles from Avhich it may 
be exploited. 

Use the director's name prominently in your an- 



nouncements and you might make it plain that the 
story — they may already be familiar with Donn 
Byrne's novel — is somewhat out of the ordinary. 
This promise should prove thoroughly attractive par- 
ticularly where they demand something new. The 
cast deserves special mention and there is a long list 
of names for you to use. Properly handled the picture 
should prove a profitable proposition. 



Jhe Greatest Box-Office Picture Tiell Shipman 
SverTRade 



A tremendous romance 
and melodrama of virgin 
Alaska. 

A story of gold and frozen, 
snowswept wastes; of a 
duped girl who won her 
fight against Man and 
Nature in their most mer- 
ciless mood. 

Filled in a dozen great 
episodes with the famous 
animals that no other star 
has ever learned to handle 
so well. 



M 



Bert Van Tuyle 
presents 



Ihe GRUB 



AStory qfthe 




Directed by Bert Van Tuyle 

in collaboration With the author 

This tremendous eight-reel production could be played to amazing receipts nationally as a 
"road show." Miss Shipman and her distributors believe that pictures of this caliber 
should go to the established picture first runs to give them the success and earning that 
they need and deserve at this time more than ever before. 

Prints of "The Grub-Stake" are now on the way to all American Releasing branch offices. 




WALTER E. GREENE, haJm F. B. WARREN, C"«fJ>m*fcii 

7UM MA« HEP. y.lP^ T.ffWCB 



THE 



Sunday, January 7, 1923 



<^»S 



DAILV 



Jack Ford Makes Interesting and Entertaining Picture of Famous Poem 



"THE FACE ON THE BARROOM FLOOR" 

Fox 

DIRECTOR Jack Ford 

AUTHOR G. Marion Burton 

SCENARIO BY Eugene B. Lewis 

CAMERAMAN George Schneiderman 

AS A WHOLE A very interesting picture that 

has been skillfully made and offers a good en- 
tertainment 

STORY Particularly well constructed and 

executed; good box office possibilities in it and 
fine audience appeal 

DIRECTION Excellent; there's a genuine agree- 
able surprise in the way Ford has done this 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very fine 

LIGHTINGS Good 

PLAYERS Henry B. Walthall gives a remark- 
ably worth while performance ; Ruth Clifford 
a suitable lead; others Frederick Sullivan, Alma 
Bennet and Norval MacGreagor 

EXTERIORS Some very beautiful coast shots 

INTERIORS All right 

DETAIL Satisfactory 

CHARACTER OF STORY Degenerate, once 

famous artist, relates incidents that caused his 
downfall, and paints the face of the woman on 
the barroom floor 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,785 feet 

This is by far the best of the recent Fox specials and 
a great deal of credit is due Jack Ford for the success 
of the production. "The Face on the Barroom Floor" 
will undoubtedly prove an agreeable surprise for those 
who have been wondering just how the G. Marion 
Burton poem would be handled as a screen story. The 
result is very satisfying. It isn't often that a story, 
told through the use of flash-backs, maintains a com- 



prehensive continuity or ;i well sustained interesl but 
Jack Ford has succeeded in doing both. 

In the first place it has been well constructed and 
very carefully treated. The characters are introduced 
in a way that secures your interest in them righl 
from the start and maintains it throughout. The de- 
velopment is unusually good and Ford has built to- 
ward the climax with steadily increasing interest. 
His method of using the flash-hack denotes extreme 
care and discretion. One reason for the success of 
picture is that Ford does not shift the action. The 
painter starts relating his story to a group gathered 
in a cafe and he remains there during the entire telling 
of the story. On the other hand there is the dinner 
party where those concerned in the past life of the 
painter are gathered. Through this definite placement 
the spectator does not lose track of events and the de- 
nouement is both comprehensive and consistent. 

For those who prefer to have something left to their 
imagination, the first ending would be more desirable 
but probably from an average audience viewpoint, 
'li epilogue scene, showing the regenerated artist re- 
united with his former love, will be the more appro- 
priate. 

Henry Walthall gives one of the best performances 
of his career as Robert Stevens, the hero of the famous 
poem. Walthall's portrayal is well worth seeing and it 
is doubtful if anyone could do it better. His emotional 
scenes are done with considerable restraint and sin- 
cerity. Ford allows a few too many shots of Walthall 
walking with his back to the camera. This registers 
effectively at first since it shows the man's weakness 
in his gait, but it is slightly overdone. Production 
values are very good. The photography is excellent 
and many of the coast shots very beautiful. The storm 
is rather mechanical but may serve for a fair thrill. 
The cast is first rate with Ruth Clifford a pleasing 
heroine. 



Undoubtedly Contains Fine Possibiliti es For the Box Office 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Here's a very definite box office attraction and you 
have a title that should certainly draw a good business. 
Further than the drawing power of the title, you haS e a 
very worth while picture in back of it and a story with 
a good deal of sure-fire audience appeal. Everyone 
who has ever been anywhere at all has heard "The 
Face on the Barroom Floor." It would be well to 
have the showing preceded by a recital of the poem to 
refresh their memories and be careful to secure an 



appropriate musical accompaniment with a catchy 
theme melody. 

The picture is the best of the recent Fox specials 
and with the proper boosting it should prove a thor- 
oughly gratifying box office number. Let them know 
about' the performance of Henry Walthall and make 
promises for his work. Use Jack Ford's name and 
above all, boost the title and say that it is a picture that 
will appeal to all and offend none. 



J/ie FILM GUILD represents 

Glenn 







"Written and Directed bq 
FRANK TUTTLE 

Photographed and Supervised by 
FRED WALLER, JP. 

TUTTL WALLER 

PRODUCTION 





YOU WANT 
SECOND FIDDLE 

for several money making reasons! 

FIRST— As a picture, it is a win- 
ner. 

SECOND— It will have behind it a 
national advertising campaign. 
Four powerful, half page ad- 
vertisements will tell the 2,250,- 
000 readers of the Saturday 
Evening Post what a wonderful 
picture it is. 

THIRD— It stars GLENN HUN- 
TER, whose popularity as a 
screen star increases every 
day, now making stage history 
as "MERTON" in "MERTON 
OF THE MOVIES." 

FOURTH— It has Mary Astor, 
one of the most sensational 
screen discoveries of recent 
years, lending support to Mr. 
Hunter. 

FIFTH — It has a story, wonderful- 
ly handled, that will hit home 
because it depicts the life of mil- 
lions of our movie patrons. 





HUNTiEra 




^ 



^PIDDLE, 

MARYASTOR 




ICTURE 
WORTH 
SHOUTING 

ABOUT/ 



THE 



■Ztfrl 



DAILY 



Sunday, January 7, 1923 



Good Dramatic Material That Has B een Carefully Handled 



"THE POWER OF A LIE" 

Universal 

DIRECTOR George Archainbaud 

AUTHOR Johann Bojer 

SCENARIO BY Charles Kenyon 

CAMERAMAN Charles Stumar 

AS A WHOLE Average dramatic offering that 

has been satisfactorily produced and will please 
a majority 

STORY Given a good treatment and interest is 

nicely sustained; contains several good dramatic 
moments 

DIRECTION First rate for a picture of this type ; 

uses very good judgment usually 

PHOTOGRAPHY All right 

LIGHTINGS Good 

PLAYERS Well suited and capable cast that in- 
cludes Mabel Julienne Scott, David Torrence, 
Maude George, Earl Metcalfe and June Elvidge 

EXTERIORS Not many 

INTERIORS Suitable 

DETAIL Adequate 

CHARACTER OF STORY Man lies to shield 

his reputation with the result that sister's fiance 
is accused of forgery 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 4,910 feet 

For those who like more serious thinking stories, 
Johann Bojer's "The Power of a Lie" will prove thor- 
oughly interesting and a satisfying entertainment. 
The theme has been very well handled by George 
Archainbaud. There were several instances where he 
might have overdone things but the scenes are acted 
with considerable repression and there is obvious in- 
dication of good judgment on the part of the director, 
particularly in the fact that he does not overdo scenes 
such as the rounders' party, the 'fire or the trial. The 
last episode is quite a favorite topic for directors to 
dwell upon but Archainbaud does not carry it to 



extremes and there is no time wasted once the ending 
is in sight. The story moves along at a good pace with 
the interest well sustained throughout and the parts 
are in the hands of capable players. 

David Torrence plays the fairly important role of 
the man who lied while Earl Metcalfe makes the most 
of the opportunities afforded by the part of the man 
injured by the lie. Mabel Julienne Scott is an at- 
tractive heroine and photographs nicely although the 
numerous close-ups accorded Maude George, as Tor- 
rence's wife, would have been used to better advan- 
tage for Miss Scott. June Elvidge has an inning in 
the dinner episode when she hints that the husband of 
her hostess was the one who attended the midnight 
orgy which ended in a fire and the death of one of the 
party. Incidentally this bit is very well done from 
a directorial standpoint. Others in the cast are Ruby 
Lafayette, Phillip Smalley, Stanton Heck and Winston 
Miller. 

Archainbaud builds toward a first rate suspense in 
the climax and for a time the spectator cannot decide 
whether hero will really be convicted of the forgery 
charge. It is very likely that a good many will expect 
that the "mysterious woman" who attended the party 
and saw Hammond sign the note, will come forward 
and tell what she knows. The fact that they get 
around to the happy ending in a different manner 
makes it all the more unexpected and convincing. 

Story : Hammond signs a note at the home of 
Burton where a party is in progress. A fire casts an 
unpleasant light on the affair and rather than have 
his wife know that he was at Burton's, Hammond later 
infers that the signature is a forgery. Burton loses 
the love of Betty, Hammond's sister, who later believes 
in him and tries to shield Burton by saying she saw 
Hammond sign the note. Hammond's own confession 
saves Burton. 



Will Appeal to a Good Many and Title Will Attract 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Exhibitors catering to people who prefer more seri- 
ous thinking stories or subjects dealing with situations 
that require more thought than a light, humorous 
feature, will undoubtedly please them with "The Power 
of a Lie." You could probably arouse considerable in- 
terest by using the title with catchlines although it is 
quite sufficient of itself to indicate the theme. 



Say : "Have you ever thought what "The Power of a 
Lie' is? See how it threatened the life and liberty of 
an innocent victim of another's lie in Universal's 
latest attraction at the blank theater." Of the players 
you might use the names of Mabel Julienne Scott, 
David Torrence, Earl Metcalfe and June Elvidge. 



Sunday, January 7, 1923 




Gloria Swanson in Another of Her Lavishly Mounted Productions 



Gloria Swanson in 

"MY AMERICAN WIFE" 

Sam Wood Prod. — Paramount 

DIRECTOR Sam Wood 

AUTHOR Hector Turnbull 

SCENARIO BY Monte Katterjohn 

CAMERAMAN Alfred Gilks 

AS A WHOLE "Another Gloria Swanson pic- 
ture" should cover it adequately ; it is just what 
she usually does 

STORY Involves South American politics as a 

side issue with a pretty romance for the star 
as the main situation 
DIRECTION Almost DeMille-ish at times; pro- 
vides plenty of atmosphere and some spectacular 
effects 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS Good 

STAR Hasn't exhausted her supply of bizarre 

headdresses or unusual evening gowns 

SUPPORT Antonio Moreno very well suited 

opposite for star and does good work ; others 
Eric Mayne, Geno Corrado, Josef Swickard; 
Eileen Pringle and Walter Long 

EXTERIORS Appropriate 

INTERIORS Some big and lavish settings 

DETAIL Ample 

CHARACTER OF STORY Rich Kentucky girl 

disapproved by parents of South American aris- 
tocrat, wins him in spite of the objections 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 6,061 feet 

To say that "My American Wife" is anything more 
than another typical Gloria Swanson offering seems 
superfluous because it is just one more vehicle to show 
off Paramount's dazzling star in another series of pic- 
tures that include lavish settings, attractive atmos- 
phere, some spectacular effects and, of course, Miss 
Swanson in a number of gowns that give her added 



distinction as a purveyor of thrills from a sartorial 
viewpoint. There are also some more equally bizarre 
and uncomfortable looking headdn ss< s which will ■ 
tainly give her feminine admirers something to talk 
about. She certainly is in a class by herself when it 
comes to unique modes of hair dressing. 

Other than the star's appearance the picture is not 
especially attractive. It offers < ne or two slight 
thrills in the way of a horse rare and a duel. Beyond 
that there is some sort of conflict between two factions 
of a South American community, with the son of each 
family striving for the favor of an American woman. 
Sam Wood tells the story nicely and has spent a good 
deal of money; too much in fact, to provide some 
spectacular effects such as the flower carnival, a lavish 
party and the elaborate ball. Of course these things 
dress the story up extensively but it is great waste 
of money when the material is not deserving of it. 

There is some slight humorous relief but the theme 
is mostly dramatic with the climax affording- a rather 
forceful conclusion. The American girl pretends to 
favor the son of De Grossa merely to further her 
scheme to expose him for the attempted assassination 
of her lover, Manuel. The exposition is made at the 
height of the grand ball and gives the'picture a satisfy- 
ing ending. The star's gown of ermine tails, worn in 
this scene, will undoubtedly cause considerable com- 
ment. Antonio Moreno is a desirable leading man and 
does very good work in this. 

Story : Following a duel in which Manuel La Tassa 
avenges an insult to Natalie Chester, an American girl, 
Manuel is nursed back to health by the girl. She 
leaves when his people object to her presence. To 
verify her suspicion that all was not fair in the duel, 
Natalie patronizes Manuel's opponent, Pedro, and after 
gaining the necessary evidence exposes him at the 
grand ball, wins the admiration of Manuel's people 
and is happy with him. 



For Star's Admirers Or Where They Want Pictorial Appeal 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



You know best what returns the Gloria Swanson pic- 
tures bring you. If she is a drawing card and your 
folks are satisfied with the pictures in which she 
usually appears, you can feel certain there will be no 
exception in the case of "My American Wife." The 
star appears to splendid advantage at all times and 
for the benefit of your women folks, don't fail to men- 
tion the variety of new and dazzling costumes which 
she displays in this one. 



Talk about the star's new leading man. He has 
many admirers who will probably be anxious to see 
him playing opposite Gloria Swanson. It may be 
better to talk about the lavish settings and more or 
less spectacular atmosphere. It is what a good many 
people want to look at so attract their attention to 
"My American Wife." Say it is a Sam Wood produc- 
tion and you might mention the race and duel for the 
action events. 



TH E ALBANY EVEN 




'nv-. 



Notoriety Gets off to A Flying Start at the 

Clinton Square Theatre 



EIGHT REELS OF 
ACTION IN WILL 
NIGH'S "NOTORipxr 

Three times last night thl 
ence at 1he7Cto>'°P Squ«» 
Theatre caught its breatti whe 




"Notoriety" at 
Clinton Square 
For Full Week 



different climaxes in the Wi 
photoplay, "Notoriety," came 
When the last flicker of the ei 
film was flashed, the unanimoi 
ion of all 'present was that the 
production had enough thrill ai 
interest to 611 three pictures in 
one. 

When Arthur Beal, impersod 
Rod La Rocque, takes the 
the court-room and defends 
who is held for the shooting 
society idol, the audience could 
sist applauding. An attack 
craze for sensationalism and 
of the present day that is the 
est message the screen has < 
tered, took the house by storm 
word in the titles and every ge 
the actor rang true and struc 
We could almost hear him aci 
public for encouraging crime 
plauding notorious characters 
names appear in public print. 

And just when we thought : 
could be made any stronge 
Alden, acting as Ann Bolani 
picture, came to the front of t 
with a condemnation of the lu 
limelight that brought tears 
scene that was as touching as 
have seen in recent times she 
the perils of popularity that 
young girls who 'seek fame and find 
shame instead. 



CLASS OF SERVICE 


SYMBOL 


Telegram 




Day Letter 


Blue 


Night Message 


Nite 


Night Letter 


N L 


II rtone ol these three symbols 
appears alter the check (number of 
word*) this Is a teleo'am Other- 
vJsells character is indicated by the 
symbol appearing after the check. 



WESTE 




NEWCOMB CARLTON. PRESIDENT 



GEORGE W. E. ATKINS. FIRST VICE-PRESIBEKt 



CLASS OF SERVICE 



TelegraT 



Day Letter 



Wight Message 



MghUetter 



Symbol 



Blue 



NL 



II none ol ihese three symbols 
appears ltret the check (number ol 
words) this 13 a telegram Omer- 
•iseits character is indicated by the 
symbol appearing slier the check. 



RECEIVED AT 



1 



Promises to Offer 
Thrill to Patrons 
Movie Screen. 




ABA 22 47 NL 5 EXTRA 

ALBANY NY 6 
WEBER AFT) NOHTR 

1600 BROADWAY NEWYORK NY 
BACKED THEM TO THE BOX OFFICE AT 730 AGAIN TOHIGHT 
CONSIDERED THE OFF NIGHT OP THE WEEK MY PATRONS HAP TO STAND ON 
BAlCCffY STAIRWAY 

FRED ELLIOTT CLINTON SQUARE THEATRE ALBANY NY 




m i l MM 

Oeorce Ttackathorne. 

T" !. Ttarne 

dp* 



LINTON SQUARE!. 

I mighty motion pid ur 

r>me to town, to he fen 

w eek «t » lie Clinton 

fcpr. Where it had tt: 

•rday The new picture i 

eight reels and take 

om the true- experiences 

jtrl rn h modern metrop 

ne of the action starts in 

t flnt of n hard -working 

o is the adopted mother 

Dee nog Like many girls 

Pigeon' drr-amt, of being 

day — -of bnvmg ber oa-ni 

ui the -papers and bpittg 

by her friends Hev 

tru* one day when she 

Land in front of -t tnillioo- 

wherc ore of the guests 

rerpptlnn i<» mvstennufd? 

nnunal drop** the guo at 

iQ>. and from that mo 

inuorent girl of the tene 

talk of the town. Her 

Died in newspaper head 

r picture appears side by 

t of (be millionaire who 

that a theatrical man 
along and urges her t<- 
ge of her popularity j t 
>y starring in a show 
)n >a about to succumb 
tatioo Arthur Beal. file 
aught the criminal in the 
who secretly is attracted 
steps in and shbws her 
hat fhe lure of the lime 
forth The lesson that 
> >s the tact thrilling mo- 
pk-ture aod lpaves nn im 
will never be forgotten 
of "N'otonety* includes 
leading stars of filmdora. 
ne Powers, who plays 
Pigeon, ' Rod La Rocque 
Richard Trav 
Sherry and Mairy AI 



The Years Greatest Gift To the Independent Market 



. . 



WILL NIGH'S CLASSIC CREATION 

NOTORIETY" 

Produced and Distributed by 



L. LAWRENCE WEBER & BOBBY NORTH 



1600 Broadway 



New York City 



THE LOUISVILLE Ml 




Alamo Theatre Holds Them Out With 
Will Nigh's Latest Society Smash 



Sight Reel Photodrama Has Enough 
Action for Three Pictures. 




ALAMO. 

ALL WEEK— Notoriety ** 

Thai the world flocks to 
'crimson lily" was tbe theme a 
which the picture Notoriety.' 
O'icntd a week's engagement 
Alamo Theater yesterday afterm 
woven 

The film is a good one for the 
because U brings a vivid realiza 
what the demand o: "the preset 
public for siand.v 
is doing to th 
>ounger f genei i 
tlon. 

(»ne sees 'h 
picture of a youn t - 
gul. pure in rmrwl 
and body, living 
in the tpncm.'ni 
settlement!* of Hi- 
n't>, but longmR 
for th- bettct 
things of life an.' 
a career Con 
sequently she is 
made to reallz 
Through the rol 
umns of th* 
press that sh- 

=SWS ? - t; ««-"«» l 

fore she can mean much In t 
of the ■puhLic 

She wanders out one nigh 
«tops to peep in the window at 
in one of the big downtown 
Just in time to catch a pistol t 
■jut of an upstairs window fol 
a murder which has been corn 
The police arnve.on the see 
And her hold.ng the pistol At 
she goes through the usual sei 
ut a criminal murder trial and 
idol of masses 

As generally happens to 

who seek undeserved farm. 

girl got more than she ba*g 

for The effects of ''Notoi'flj 

strikingly developed to the 
bv the master hand of the -It 1 : 
The cast includes si\ sti- 
nne Powets. Mai v Aldnj 
HackMhornt Ku h'dfrtlj 

Rott I .a IXocque and J 
Shcery 





CUSS OF SERVICE 



Telei 



gry 



Day tetter 



Night Message 



Night Lett er 



N L 



\t none oi these itiree symbols 
appeals after the check (nurcbt: ol 
words) this Is a teleo'am Other- 
-iseits character is trxjtcated bv the 
rymbol appearing atrei the check. 



WEST 



WESTERN UNION 

IE 



UNION 
AM 



NEWCOMB CARLTON, president 



GEORGE W. E. ATKINS. FIRST V1CBPRESIOEK 



CLASS Of SERVICf 



DIRECTOR NIGH 
SCORES THREE TIMES 
NOTORIETY" 



Telegram 



Oay Letter / 



Night Message 



Ni ght letter 



Blue 
Nite 



N L 



It none ol these three symbols 

appears after (he check ( imber ot 
words) this is a telerjiam Otriar- 

mseita tMaricier ts indies 1 by the 
symbol appealing al'er thi icjcJl 



RECEIVED AT 







tA395 49 4 EXTRA NL 

LOUISVI LLE KY 4 
WEBER AND NORTH XC 607 

1600 BROADWAY WEWYORK NY 
BILL NIGH 3C0RES AGAIN NOTORIETY TURNED TREB.AWAY'jHOW LONG WILL WE 
RATS TO WAIT FOR THE NEXT NIGH PRIDUCTIOS N0T0RIETY-B0IH 
ENTERTAINED AND PLEASED EVERY ORE AND 13 A CREDIT TO THE THEATRE 
FLAM DID EXCEPTIONALLY WELL WITH- THE HXPLDTTAT101T TH2KK3 FOR 
NOTORIETY 

FRED DOLLE ALAMO THEATRE LOUISVILLE SY. 



Applause at Thrill). 
g Society Photo- 
drama 



1 spellbinding situations 

ience of the 
a ia mo Theatre last night 

tional eight-reel photo- 

dern girl's madness for 
Is flashed on -the screen 
at has caused more talk 

film of recent times is 
itest masterpiece, "No- 

)hotoplay seemed to be 
succession of suspense 
The director, who also 
jry, has succeeded-., in 
•y variety of thrill— 
sical and sentimental, 
fast moving screeD 
Straight from the 
the humble home o! 
former stage beauty 
ched and poverty-strick-i 
s shown in all its pathos, 
is set on edge. When 
baracter of the picture 
«on" Deering everyone 
as human, and it seems 
known her for years 
}r fame, her desire to be" 
sounds familiar, because 
were that way. . When 
lops and we see how 
ng for popularity brings 
e with a daring society 
that anyone could have 
o do as she did, in her 



A Photodramatic Thunderbolt of Perpetual motion with 
an Array of Great Characters, Maurine Powers, Mary 
Alden, Rod La Rocque, Geo. Hockathorne, Richard 
Travera, J. Barney Sherry, Anders Randolph and ethers. 

WILL NIGH'S PHOTODRAMA 



"NOTORIETY 



9 3 



Produced and Distributed by 

L. LAWRENCE WEBER & BOBBY NORTH 

Foreign Rights Controlled by 

APOLLO TRADING CORP., 1600 Broadway, N. Y. C. 



CURRENT RELEASES 



Data 



Footage Reviewed Release Date 



FooUg* R 



Playgv 



Nov. 



AMERICAN RELEASING CORP. 

Fooli of Fortune 5,609 8-20-22 

Queen of the Moulin Rouge 6,700 8-20-22 

Me and My Gal 5,433 

The Woman He Loved 5,200 9-10-22 

Timothy's Quest 6,377 9-24-22 

The Trail of the Axe (Dustin Farnum) 4,428 10-1-22 

The Mohican's Daughter 4,700 10-1-22 

The Danger Point 5,807 11-12-22 

The Marriage Chance 

The Challenge (Dolcres Cassinelli) 

When the Desert Calls (Violet Heming) 6,159 11-19-22 

What Fools Men Are 6,087 12- 3-22 

The Super-Sex 5,749 12- 3-22 

As a Man Lives 5,800 12-17-22 



ASSOCIATED EXHIBITORS, INC. 

(Distributed through Pathe) 

The Woman Who Came Back 5,106 8-13-22 

Dusk to Dawn (Florence Vidor) 5,200 9- 3-22 

Grandma's Boy (Harold Lloyd) 4,841 9-10-22 

Till We Meet Again (Mae Marsh) 6,000 10-29-22 

A Bill of Divorcement (Constance Binney) ... .6,000 8-15-22 
The Woman Who Fooled Herself (May 

Allisun) 5,401 11-12-22 

Breaking Home Ties 6,000 11-26-22 

Conquering the Woman (Florence Vidor) 5,887 12-17-22 

« Pictures, Inc. 

Through the Storm 5,905 8-27-22 

The Isle of Doubt (Wyndham Standing) 5,483 9-17-22 

Face to Face 4,587 10-1-22 

The Man She Brought Back 4,792 10-8-22 



FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY CORP. 

6 The Man Who Saw Tomorrow (Thos Meighan)6,993 11-5-22 

6 On the High Seas (Dalton-Holt) 5,171 10-8-22 

13 The Young Rajah (Rodolph Valentino) 7,705 11-12-22 

20 Anna Ascends (Alice Brady) 5,959 11-19-22 

20 Clarence (Wm. deMille) 6,146 10-22-22 

27 The Impossible Mrs. Bellew (Gloria Swanson) .7,155 10-29-22 

27 The Pride of Palomar (Cosmopolitan) 7,500 11-26-22 

When Knighthood Was in Flower (Mar. Davies) 10,800 9-17-22 

4 Ebb Tide (Geo. Melford) 7,336 11-26-22 

1 1 Outcast ( Elsie Ferguson 7,390 12-10-22 

18 Singed Wings (Stanlaws Prod.) 7,788 12-3-22 

25 Back Home and Broke (Thos. Meighan) 

25 Daughter of Luxury (Agnes Ayres) 4,538 12-10-22 

1 Kick In (Fitzmaurice Prod.) 7,074 12-24-22 

8 Thirty Days (Wallace Reid) 4,930 12-17-22 

15 ' The Enemies of Women (Cosmopolitan) 

22 Making a Man (Jack Holt) 5,594 12-24-22 

22 Missing Millions (Alice Brady) 5,870 9-24-22 

29 The World's Applause (Wm. DeMille) 



FOX FILM CORP. 

Teas Mix Series 

Just Tony 4,480 8-20-22 

Do and Dare 4,744 9-24-22 

Tom Mix in Arabia 4,400 

William Farnum 

Moonshine Valley 5,679 8-20-22 

Without Compromise 5,173 11-12-22 

Dustia Farnum 

The Yoiemite Trail 4.735 9-17-22 

While Justice Waits 4,762 11-26-22 

Three Who Paid 4,859 12-24-22 

Shirley Mason Series 

The New Teacher 4,453 8-13-22 

Youth Most Have Love 4,368 9-10-22 

Shirley of the Circus 4,668 11-12-22 

Wfflua KnaMll 

Mixed Faces 4,400 10-1-22 

Man's Size 4,316 12-17-22 

Cfcarfea Joaea 

West of Chicago 4,694 8-20-22 

The Bells of San Juan 

Boss of Camp 4 4,235 11-19-22 

John Gilbert 

Calvert's Valley 4,416 10-8-22 

The Love Gambler 4,682 11-5-22 

A California Romance 3,892 12-10-22 

Special 

Who Are My Parents 8,361 9-10-22 

The Village Blacksmith 7,000 11-12-22 

The Town That Forgot God 10,613 12-10-22 



Dec. 



Jan. 



FIRST NATIONAL 

Fools First .5,770 8-13-22 

The Masquerader (Guy Bates Post) 7,835 8-20-22 

East is West (Constance Talmadge) 7,737 9-3-22 

The Light in the Dark (Hope Hampton) 5,600 9- 3-22 

Kindred of the Dust (R. W. Walsh) 8,422 9- 3-22 

The Eternal Flame (Norma Talmadge) 7,453 9-24-22 

Skin Deep (Thos. H. Ince) 6,303 10-8-22 

The Bond Boy (Richard Barthelmess) 6,902 8-15-22 

Oliver Twist (Jackie Coogan) 7,600 11-5-22 

Brawn of the North 7,000 11-19-22 

The Pilgrim (Chas. Chaplin) 4,000 11-19-22 

White Shoulders (Katherine MacDonald) 5,966 11-26-22. 

Omar hte Tentmaker (Guy Bates Post) 8,000 12- 3-22 

Minnie (Neilan Prod.) 6,696 12- 3-22 

Lorna Doone . 6,200 12-10-22 

The Hottentot 5,953 12-17-22 

GOLDWYN PICTURES 

When Romance Rides (Zane Grey) 5,003 4-16-22 

The Dust Flower 5,651 7- 9-22 

Always the Woman (Betty Compson) 5,450 7-16-22 

.*■ Voices of the City, (Lon Chaney) 5,600 8-20 22 

Remembrance (Rupert Hughes) 5,650 9-17-22 

Brothers Under the Skin 4,983 11)9-22 

Hungry Hearts .....6,517 12-3-22 

A Blind Bargain ..4,500 12-10-22 

Broken Chains 6,190 12-17-22 

D. W. GRIFFITH, INC. 

One Exciting Night 11,000 10-29-22 

W. W. HODKINSON CORP. 

The Headless Horseman (Will Rogers) 6,000 10-22-22 

Benj. B. Hampton 

Heart's Haven 5,500 S-ll-S*; 

Rex Ingram Prod. 

Trifling Women 9,000 10-8-22 

Hollandia Film Corp. 

Bulldog Drummond 5,000 11-26-22 

Producers Security 

The Kingdom Within 6,063 12-24-22 

METRO PICTURES CORP. 

The Hands of Naia (Clara Kimball Young) 6,997 8-13-22 

June Madness (Viola Dana) 6,000 10-1-22 

Youth to Youth (Billie Dove) 6,603 10-29-22 

The Forgotten Law 6,000 10-22-22 

Enter Madame (Clara Kimball Young) 6,000 11-5-22 

Love in the Dark (Viola Dana) 6,000 11-19-22 

The Toll of the Sea 4,600 12- 3-22 

Quincy Adams Sawyer 7,800 12- 3-22 

Peg O' My Heart (Laurette Taylor) 6,000 12-17-22 

Hearts Aflame 8,100 12-24-22 

Tiffany Prod. 

B.oaJway Rose (Mae Murray) 7,000 9-24-22 

Rex Ingram Prod. 

Trifling Women 9,000 10-8-22 

PREFERRED PICTURES— AL LICHTMAN 

Rich Men's Wives 6,500 8-27-22 

Shadows 5,000 11-5-22 

Thorns and Orange Blossome 6.971 11-26-22 

FILM BOOKING OFFICES OF AMERICA (R-C) 

The Snowshoe Trail (Jane Novak) 5,832 9-17-22 

The Hound of the Baskervilles 5,382 9-17-22 

If I Were Queen (Ethel Clayton) 5,955 10-22-22 

The Broadway Madonna (Dorothy Revier) 6,000 11-19-22 

Good Men and True (Harry Carey) 5,400 11-12-22 

Thelma (Jane Novak) 6.497 11-26-22 

When Love Comes 4,800 12-10-22 

Capt. Fly-By-Night 6,000 

'■ 
I 



Sunday, January 6, 1923 



fsJS^S 



DAILY 



13 



Poor Judgment In Direction and Unpleasant Detail Mar the Story 



Edward Sloman presents 
"THE LAST HOUR" 
Mastodon Films, Inc. — State Rights 

DIRECTOR Edward Sloman 

AUTHOR Frank R. Adams 

SCENARIO BY Hylda Hollis 

CAMERAMAN Max Dupont 

AS A WHOLE Crook melodrama that outruns 

all of the similar productions for sensational 
thrills and gruesome effects 
STORY Told in too much detail that is un- 
pleasant and at times repulsive 

DIRECTION Should know better than to offer 

some of the scenes that are included here 

PHOTOGRAPHY All right 

LIGHTINGS Suitable 

PLAYERS Milton Sills too good an actor to be 

wasted on such material ; Carmel Myers in a 
rut again; a fine cast on the whole but handi- 
capped by poor story 

EXTERIORS Few 

INTERIORS Adequate 

DETAIL Overdone 

CHARACTER OF STORY Based on the idea 

that "for every wrong done you pay here — not 
hereafter." 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 6,929 feet 

It does seem that a director of experience, such as 
Edward Sloman, would certainly know better than to 
offer a production containing as many unpleasant 
sequences as "The Last Hour," a crook melodrama 
based on Frank R. Adams' story "Blind Justice." Just 
why Sloman saw fit to run into such a mass of repul- 
sive detail as that depicted in at least two instances is 
inconceivable and unjustifiable. There is a wholly 
unpleasant touch early in the story when a youth. 
suspected of a bank robbery, is shot down by a detec- 
tive. This is followed a little later by the interruption 



of a dinner being tendered the governor by a political 
boss when the governor suffers a paralytic stroke at the 
table. This same man is given a further chance to 
depict the agony of such an affliction when he is called 
upon to sign a pardon. Sloman not only shows poor 
judgment in repeating this but he also allow s agonizing 
. close-ups of Eric Mayne, who plays the part, blinking 
his eyes and otherwise denoting the effects of a stroke. 

Sloman still further carries out his intention to pro- 
vide sensational thrills in the climax, a masterpiece 
for long drawn out suspense arrived at through a 
series of the most unpleasant and objectionable scenes 
that have come to the screen in some time. Milton 
Sills, is the innocent man doomed to be hanged for the 
murder of a political boss who happened to be. himself, 
the murderer of Sills' brother. While Sills checks off 
the hours on the walls of his cell, Carmel Myers, his 
sweetheart, begs a pardon from the governor. His 
stroke prevents her success and she forges the sig- 
nature. A taxi driver robs her and leaves her on a 
deserted road. Meantime the hour approaches for 
the hanging. The hanging apparatus is successfully 
tested and you see Sills being led from his cell with 
the usual procession. 

Sills is blindfolded and there are close-ups of 
the hand ready to cut the rope. The real murderer, 
the girl's father, arrives to confess and save Sills but 
is knocked down by an auto at the prison gate. The 
order for the hanging is given but the ropes refuse to 
work and Sills' life is saved for another hour while the 
thing is put into order. If folks aren't worn out by 
this time they are a marvel for endurance. Those 
who do sit through it would undoubtedly be willing 
to vote a like penalty for Edward Sloman for ever 
giving them such a picture in the guise of entertain- 
ment. It just isn't and he should know better than to 
offer it as such. Frank Adams' story might have 
served for a satisfying crook melodrama but not in the 
forced, exaggerated fashion of Director Sloman. 



Will Do For Sensation Lovers But Not As a Clean-Cut Entertainment 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



You better see this one and make your own decision. 
The picture cannot possibly appeal to people with re- 
fined tastes. They will refuse to accept it because it 
depicts unpleasant incidents that hardly belong in 
subjects prepared for entertainment purposes. Where 
they go in for sensational themes, the picture will un- 
doubtedly be approved but that is its only chance of Francis, Charles Clary. Walter Long and Wilson 
appeal. Hummell. 



It is a pity such a good cast has been wasted. Near- 
lv everyone is well known and certainly Milton Sills 
deserves a better opportunity than that afforded by 
the role of Steve Cline, ex-crook and ex-war hero. 
Incidentally the war is also brought into play. Carmel 
Myers is not well suited to the emotional part given 
her. Others are Pat O'Mally. Jack Mower, Alec 






Date 



Footage Renewed 



LEWIS J. SELZNICK ENT. 

Selznick Pictures (Distributed by Select Exchanges) 

Elaine Hammerstein Star Series 

Under Oath 5,000 

b.ugeue O'Brien Star Series 

The Prophet's Paradise 

Channing of the Northwest 5,000 

Special Productions 

Love is an Awful Thing (Owen Moore) 6.500 9-10-22 

One Week of Love 7.000 11-12-22 

UNITED ARTISTS 

The Man Who Played God (Geo. Arliss) 5.810 10-8-22 

A Tailor-Made Man (Charles Ray) 8,469 10-22-22 

Robin Hood (Douglas Fairbanks) 11,000 11-5-22 

Tess of the Storm Country (Mary Pickford) .. .9,000 11-19-22 
Allied Prod. & Dist. Corp. 

The Three Must Get Theres (Max Linder) 3,842 9-10-22 

A Woman's Woman 7,892 10-8-22 

UNIVERSAL FILM MFG. CO. 

Jewel Features 

Under Two Flags (Priscilla Dean) 7,407 10-1-22 

The Kentucky Derby 5,398 10-22-22 

Universal Features 

The Loaded Door (Hoot Gibson) 4,430 8-20-22 

Don't Shoot (Herbert Rawlinson) 5,130 8-20-22 

Paid Back 4,920 8-27-22 

Top O' the Morning (Gladys Walton) 4,627 9- 3-22 

The Galloping Kid (Hoot Gibson) 4,783 9-10-22 

Caught Bluffing (Frank Mayo) 4.517 9-17-22 

Confidence (Herbert Rawlinson) 4,787 9-24-22 

The Girl Who Ran Wild (Gladys Walton) 4,506 10-1-22 

The Long Chance 4,836 10-1-22 

The Lone Hand (Hoot Gibson) 4,570 8-15-22 

Wolf Law (Frank Mayo) 4,465 10-22-22 

Another Man's Shoes (Herbert Rawlinson) .. .4,700 11-5-22 

Broad Daylight 4,961 10-29-22 

The Lavender Bath Lady (Gladys Walton) 4,113 11-12-22 

The Jilt (All-Star) 4,491 11-26-22 

The Altar Stairs (Frank Mayo) 4,641 12- 3-22 

Ridin' Wild (Hoot Gibson) 4,166 11-19-22 

Forsaking All Others 4,462 12-10-22 

One Wonderful Night (Herbert Rawlinson) 4,473 12-17-22 

VITAGRAPH 

Super-Features 

The Ladder Jinx 6,000 10-15-22 

The Ninety and Nine 6,800 12-17-22 

A Front Page Story 6,000 12-17-22 

Antonio Moreno 

A Guilty Conscience 

Alice Calhoun 

A Girl's Desir 5,000 9-17-22 

Little Wildcat 5,000 9-10-22 

Alice Joyce 

The Inner Chamber 5,951 

William Duncan 

Where Danger Smiles 5,000 

SHORT REEL RELEASES 

ASSOCIATED EXHIBITORS, INC. 

Harold Lloyd Comedies 

ASSOCIATED PRODUCERS, INC. 

Mack Sennet Comedies (2 reels) 
Ben Turpin Comedies (2 reels) 

EDUCATIONAL FILM CORP. OF AMERICA 

Selig-Pork- Photoplays (2 reels) 

Mermaid Comedies (2 reels) 

Chester Comedies (2 reels) 

Torcby Comedies (2 reels) 

Christie Comedies (2 reels) 

Vanity Comedies (1 reel) 

Gayety Comedies ( 1 reel) 

Educational Specials: The Race of the Age (Man O' War), 2 reels; Art 

of Diving (Kellerman), 1 reel; Babe Ruth — How he Knocks 

His Home Run, 1 reel; Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, 1 reel; 

Modern Centaurs, 1 reel. 
Bruce Scenics Beautiful (1 reel) 
Chester Outings (1 reel) 
Chester Screenics (1 reel) 
Miscellaneous (1 reel): Could Columbus Discover America, The Crater 

of Mt. Katmai, Dexie. 
Sketchografs ( 1 reel) 
Punch Comedies (2 reels) 
Campbell Comedies (2 reels) 
Cinal Films (slow speed) 

FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY 

Paramount-Burton Holmes Travel Pictures (1 reel): 

Paramount-Burlingame Adventure Scenics (1 reel) 

Paramount-De Haven Comedies (2 reels) 

Paramount-Mack Sennett Comedies (2 reels) 

Paramount Magazine (1 reel): Pictionary and Cartoons (weekly). 

Paramount- Post Nature Pictures (1 reel) 

Paramount-Vandenbergh Series (2 reels) 

FIRST NATIONAL EXHIBITORS 

Charles Chaplin (2 and 3 reels) 
Toonerville Trolley (2 reels) 
Henry Lahrman Comedies (2 rati*) 
B astor Kaaton Comedies (2 reels) 



FOX FILM CORPORATION' 

Sunshine Comedies (2 reels) 

Clyde Cook Comedies (2 reels) 

Mutt and Jeff Animated Cartoons (1 reel) 

Fox News (Twice a Week). 

Serials: Bride 13 (15 episodes), Fantomas (20 episodes). 

Educational Entertainments (la week) 

Educational Entertainments (la week) 



GOLDWYN PICTURES 

Capitol Comedies (2 reels) 
Edgar Comedies (2 reels) 
Goldwyn-Bray Comedies (1 reel) 
Goldwyn-Bray Pictographs (1 reel) 
Sport Review ( 1 reel) 



W. W. HODKINSON CORP. 

The Beggar Maid (Mary Aster) (2 reels) 

The Bashful Suitor (2 reels) 

The Young Painter (Mary Astor) 

Hope (Mary Astor) 

Charles Urban's Movie Chats 

Wonders of the World (2 serials) ; First Series from No. 1 to 
No. 26 (each 1 reel) ; Second Series from No. 27 to No. 52 
(each 1 reel). 

The Four Seasons (4 reels). 



PATHE EXCHANGE, INC. 



The Timber Queen (Serial) 

Roach 1 reel comedies 

Aesop Fables, 2/3 reel cartoons 

Harold Lloyd re-issues 

Pathe Playlets, 3 reel re-issues 

Pathe Review, 1 reel educational 

Topics of the Day, 1/3 reel 

Pathe News, twice a week 

Topics of the Day — 1 a week. 



LEWIS J. SELZNICK ENTERPRISES 

Herbert Kaufman Masterpieces. 

William J. Flynn Series (Detective Series, 2 reels). 

Chaplin Classics. 

Selznick News. 

Serials: The Whirlwind (15 episodes), The Branded Four (15 episodes). 

UNIVERSAL FILM MFG. CO. 

Century Comedies (2 reels) 

Jewel Comedies — Ted Rider Series (Leonard Clapham) (2 reels) 

Serials: The Flaming Disk, 18 episodes; The Vanishing Dagger, 18 epi- 
sodes; The Dragon'* Net, 15 episodes; King of the Circus (Ed- 
die Polo), — episodes; The Diamond Queen (Eileen Sedgwick), 
— episodes; The White Horsemen, 18 episodes; Do or Die (Ed- 
die Polo), — episodes; Terror Trail, — episodes. 

Star Comedies (1 reel) 

Western and Railroad Dramas (2 reels) (Hoot Gibson, Jack Perrin, Eileen 
Sedgwick) 

Star Comedies (1 reel): When Eve Fell, No License (Billy Fletcher). 



VITAGRAPH 



Big V Special Comedies (2 reels) 
Larry Semon Comedies (2 reels) 
Jim Aubrey Comedies (2 reels) 



KINETO CO. OF AMERICA 
(Released through National Exchange) 

Kineto Review (The Living Book of Knowledge). 

Second Series (1 reel) : Was Darwin Right? Bonnie Scotland, Bird* of 

Crags and Marshes, Village Life in Switzerland, Peculiar Pet*. 

Combatting the Elements, Dexterity and Mimicry of Insects. 

Primitive Life in Tennessee, Bear Hunting in California, Paris 

the Beautiful, A Naturalist's Paradise, Morocco the Mysterious, 

Let's See the Animals. 



LEVEY, HARRY, ENTERPRISES 

Electricity — It's Development. 

NATIONAL EXCHANGES, INC. 

Serial: The Great Reward (Francis Ford and Ella Hall). 
Comedies: King Cole Comedies (Bobby Burns). 
Kineto Review (Chas. Urban) (1 reel), issued weekly. 

( ;.fj«l3«||««M PRIZMA, INCORPORATED 

26 Short Subject Color Pictures 
"Heidi of the Alps" (2 reels) 
"Bali, the Unknown" (5 reels) 
Short Real Masic Pilsa Preaact 



Short Stuff 



"The Social Buccaneer" — Universal 
Type of production 10 chapter serial 

Those who hunt excitement, regardless of plausability of 
story will find much that will please them in Universal's 
latest chapter play. Starring Jack Mulhall, whose work in 
the Jack London "Fish Patrol" series during the past few 
months may have kept him before your crowd, it manages to 
hold the interest in spite of the somewhat jumpy story, by 
Frederic Isham from his novel of the same name. The pro- 
ducers have played up the vogue for imaginary kingdoms 
defended by beautiful princesses who are rescued from peril 
by the brave American, and if your crowd is inclined to like 
this sort of thing they will be interested in knowing about it. 
A good supporting cast includes Margaret Livingston as the 
little princess, William Welsh, Harry DeVere, Robert Ander- 
son, Lucille Ricksen, George Connors, Buck Conners, Sidney 
Bracy and others. Robert Hill has directed and credit for 
the scenario is given Anthony Coldeway and Burdette Brown. 

The theme, in brief, trimmed of course with stunts to give 
the necessary thrills, is that of young John Norton, before 
the war a society darling, now returning home from the 
trenches a two-fisted American to find his father in jail 
charged with theft from the bank of which he is president. 
The money, placed there by American authorities to safeguard 
it for Thorwald during the war was to have been returned to 
Princess Elsie who is now on her way to receive it. John lets 
his father think he is still the fop that he was before the war, 
but secretly he dons his old doughboy uniform and sets out 
to clean up the crooked gang that is the cause of the trouble. 
How he wins the love of the princess as the doughboy and her 
failure to recognize him as the fop may prove a little far- 
fetched to the more critical but the rapid action will make up 
for slight deficiencies of this nature. 



"Tea N. Tea"— Cameo — Educational 

Type of production 1 reel comedy 

A good number of laughs should be resultant from Jimmie 
Adams latest, which has been directed by Fred Hibbard. 
Virginia Vance is having a birthday party but Virginia is not 
interested in anyone but Jimmie. A fat boy who is in love 
with her starts to spoil the party and by several sweet little 
tricks manages to have the cook leave, break three or four 
chairs and generally upset things, finally putting T. N. T. in 
the birthday cake which explodes and wrecks everything but 
Jimmie's love. A negro, whose name is not given, manages 
to inject several laughs without much effort. 



"Paste and Paper"— Hal Roach— Pathe 

Type of production 1 reel comedy 

Rather more mirth-provoking than the average run of Paul 
Parrot's offerings is this one-reeler, and it has a good chance 
of amusing your crowd. Parrot is a novice in the paper- 
hanging business and has everything possible happen to him 
while making a rush job of papering the drawing room of a 
fashionable family. There is a laugh at the finish when he has 
hung paper on all the walls, covering both windows and doors 
and making himself a prisoner. But members of the family 
rescue him by falling through the paper which is as surprising 
to them as to him. 



"Hazel From Hollywood"— Christie— Educational 
Type of production 2 reel comedy 

Farce, comedy, melodrama and thrills are all to be found in 
Christie's "Hazel From Hollywood" in which Dorothy Devore 
and Henry Murdock are featured. Dorothy Devore does some 
very good work as the awkward young miss from Iowa who 
goes to Hollywood to become a star. She actually does break 
into the films by accidentally getting into a burning building 
in a serial scene and is accidentally rescued by the hero. The 
producer refuses to erect another building so that the real 
star can do the scene and continues the picture with Hazel. 
Henry Murdock, Hazel's hick sweetheart, comes to rescue 
her from the villains of Hollywood and wrecks many a scene 
in his efforts. 

Your folks will probably enjoy the studio atmosphere where 
desert love scenes become mixed with wild west stuff. To 
add a little more plot, Hazel overhears three bank robbers 
planning to actually rob the local bank whose officials have 
agreed to permit a fake robbery to take place for a scene. 
After much excitement she arrives with the police just as the 
robbery is taking place. The picture has real entertainment 
value. 



"Stung"— J. K. McDonald— Pathe 

Type of production 2 reel comedy 

Directed by Mason N. Litson this Johnny Jone's comedy 
tells its pleasant little tale in a smooth, interesting fashion, 
that will hold the attention and interest of almost any audi- 
ence. Johnny is ably assisted by his usual company of youth- 
ful players headed by little Gertrude Messinger. A young 
actor arrives in the little town from the city and proceeds to 
break up a love affair by taking charge of an amateur per- 
formance of "A Midsummer Night's Dream." Johnny seeking 
to play a joke on him fills the donkey's head which the actor 
uses for the part of Bottom, with honey, but a swarm of bees, 
attracted to the honey fill the head instead. With eyes 
"stung" shut, the youth is seized by deputy sheriffs for run- 
ning away with a partly paid for machine. This they sell to 
Johnny for the amount of the balance due and the love affair 
is patched up. 



"The Terrible Tree"— Tony Sarg— Educational 

Type of production 1 reel animated cartoon 

Most artistic as well as entertaining is Tony Sarg's latest 
subject, which deals with an ancient knight's fabrications to his 
wife to account for his absence. He has been sent to get a 
basket of eggs and his flirtation with the egg dealers fair 
daughter causes the dealer to smash the eggs on his head. 
But he tells his wife a story of a terrible tree which became 
human in a most fantastic manner and held him in its claw-like 
branches. Will please a high-class clientele. 



Pathe Review No. 2 

Type of production 1 reel magazine 

There are some very beautiful shots showing the path of the 
sun on water in the section entitled Photographic Gems that 
prove worthy of the name. Tinted and toned they stand out 
tis one of the high spots of the Review. Some pictures taken 
in the New York aquarium show the shark and his small fol- 
lowers, and the Pathe Color contribution shows "The Cities 
That Time Forgot," in the province of Gard, France. 



INDEPENDENT FEATURES 



Date hooiagt Reviewed 

ARROW FILM CORP. 

Headin' North 4.257 9-24-22 

Peaceful Peters (Wm. Fairbanks) 5,000 10-29-22 

Anotbei Man's Boots (Francis Ford) 5,000 11-5-22 

Uncouquered (Maciste) 6,500 11-5-22 

L. LAWRENCE WEBER & BOBBY NORTH 

Notoriety 7,000 10-8-22 

AYWON FILM CO. 

Thundering Hoofs (Peggy O Day) 5,000 10-15-22 

Another Man's Boots (Francis Ford) 5,000 

B. B. PRODUCTIONS 

How Women Love (Betty Blythe) 5,300 8-27-22 

C. B. C. FILM SALES CORP. 

Life's Greatest Question (Roy Stewart) 5,800 9-10-22 

More to be Pitied (All Star) 5,800 9-24-22 

Only a Shop Girl 6.400 12-24-22 

CUMMINGS PROD. 

Flesh and Blood (Lon Chaney) 5,147 8-27-22 

DEPENDABLE SALES CORP. 

Driven (Chas. Brabin Prod.) 5,540 11-26-22 

R. L. GIFFEN 

The Prince and the Pauper 6,522 8-20-22 

GENIUS FILMS. INC. 

Women Men Marry 5,986 10-29-22 

PHIL GOLDSTONE 

The Cub Reporter (Richard Talmadge) 5,000 9-24-22 

Deserted at the Altar 7,000 10-1-22 

Wildcat Jordan (Richard Talmadge) 5,000 10-29-22 

EQUITY PICTURES CORP. 

The Worldly Madonna (Clara Kimball Young). 5,600 7-16-22 

What's Wrong With Women 6,400 8-13-22 

HOWELLS SALES CO. 

Her Royal Love 

Sold For a Million 

Count Cagliostro 

A Daughter of Eve 

LEE & BRADFORD 

The Unconquered Woman (Rubye de Remer) 

Flesh and ipirit (Belle Bennett) 

Sally 

Branded (J osephine Earle) 

Serving Two Masters (Josephine Earle) 

'he Way ot a Man (Josephine Earle) 

Cloudburst (All Star) 

MASTER PICTURES 

Secrets of Paris 6,800 10-29-22 

MASTEDON FILMS. INC. 

Sure Fire Flint 6,400 10-29-22 

PRINCIPAL PICTURES 

Environment 5,700 12-24-22 

PRODUCERS SECURITY CORP. 

Squire Phin (Maclyn Arbuckle) 5,000 

The Soul of Man 6,000 

The Kight Way 6,000 

Welcome to Our City (Maclyn Arbuckle) 5,000 

Mr. Bingle 5,000 

Mr. Potter of Texas 6,000 

Trail of the Law 5,000 

The Country Flapper (Dorothy Gish) 5,000 8-13-22 

The Wolf's Fangs ( Wilfred Ly tell) 5,000 

In the Night (All-Star) 5,000 

RUSSELL PROD. 

Saved by Radio 5,800 9-3-22 

The Range Patrol 5,000 9-10-22 

SANFORD PRODUCTIONS 

The Better Man Wins (Pete Morrison) 5,000 10-22-22 

WM. STEINER 

Table Top Ranch 5,000 11-12-22 

TR1-STAR PICTURES CO. 

Fruits of Passion (Alice Mann & Donald Hall).. 5,000 

Water Lily (Alice Mann & Donald Hall) 5,000 

Dazzling Miss Davidson (Marjorie Ram beau) . .5,000 

How a Woman Loves (Marjorie Rambeau) ...5,000 

She Paid (Marjorie Rambean) 5.000 —— 

Mrs. Belfame (Nance O'Neil) 5.000 

UNITY PICTURES 

Why Do Men Marry 5,000 9-17-22 

WESTERN PICTURES EXPLOITATION 

The Saeebrush Trail 5,000 8-27-22 

WARNER BROS. 

Rags to Riches (Wesley Barry) 7.209 10-1-22 

The Beautiful and Damned 7,000 12-17-22 

Heroes of the Street (.Wesley Barry) 7]oO() 12-24-22 

WILLIAMSON PROD. 

Wonders of the Sea 4,300 10-29-22 



SHORT REELS-STATE RIGHTS 

ADVENTURES OF T. S. S. CORP. 

Adventures of Tarzan (Elmo Lincoln), 15 episodes. 

ALLIED DISTRIBUTING CORP. 

Alt & Howell Comedies (12 2-reels), Pure and Simple (2 reels), LSqnorisi 
Lips (2 reels). 

ARROW FILM CORP. 

Tex Detective Series. 

Arrow-Hank Mann Comedies: One every other week (2 reels). 

Blazed Trail Productions: One every other week (2 reels). 

Arrow-Northwood Dramas (2 reels) : Looking Up Jim, In th« River, 
Three and a Girl, Raiders of the North, A Knight of the Pines, 
The Man ot Brawn, The Strangers, Breed of the North, A Fight 
for a Soul, Beloved Brute, Quicksands, Border River. 

Spotlight Comedies (2 reels) : Champion by Chance, Soap Bubbles, Hei 
Husband's Flat, His Wife Jimmy. 

Ardath XLNT Comedies (2 reels): Wild Women and Tame Men, Tin 
Village Grocer, Homer Joins the Force. 

Serials: Thunderbilt Jack (Jack Hoxie), 15 episodes. 

AYCIE PICTURES CORP. 

Success Series: 15 Westerns (each 2 reels). 

AYWON FILM CORP. 

Harry Carey: 15 Westerns (each 2 reels). 
Joy Comedies: 6 (each 2 reels). 
Franklin Farnum: 12 Westerns (2 reels). 
Helen Holmes: 22 Railroad Dramas (2 reels). 
Mary Pickford Revivals. 

C. B. C. FILM SALES 

Star Ranch Westerns (2 reels). 
Screen Snapshots (Bi-monthly) (1 reel). 
Hall Room Boy Comedies (2 reels twice a month). 
Sunbeam Comedies (Billy West) (2 reels) 
Cap'n Kidd (Eddie Polo) serial 

CELEBRATED PLAYERS 

Gump (1 reel each). 

Celebrated Comedies (1 reel each). 

CLARION PHOTOPLAYS, INC. 

The Expose of Sawing a Lady in Half (2 reels) 

DOMINANT PICTURES, INC. 

Western Star Dramas (2 reels). 

EXPORT AND IMPORT FILM CO. 

Serial: The Jungle Goddess (Truman Van Dyke and Elinore Field), 15 

episodes. 

FEDERATED FILM EXCHANGE 

Monty Banks Comedies (2 reels) : Nearly Married, Kidnapper's Revenge, 
A Bedroom Scandal, Where Is My Wife? His First Honeymoon, 
Bride and Gloom, In and Out, His Dizzy Day. 

Hallroom Boy Comedies (2 reels) : False Roomers, Their Dissy Finish, 
Circus Heroes. 

Ford Weekly. 

Serial: Miracles of the Jungle, 15 episodes. 

FILM MARKET, INC. 

Iimmy Callahan, 12 >-reels. 

GAUMONT COMPANY 

News (every Tuesday) ; Graphic (every Friday). 

Serials: In the Clutches of the Hindoo (19,089 feet), 10 episodes. 

HERALD PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

Mack Swain Comedies (2 reels) : Moonlight Knight, Full of Spirit, See 
America First. 

HORIZON PICTURES, INC. 

Norma Talmadge Reissues (fourteen) (each 2 reels). 

JOAN FILM SALES CO. 

Invisible Ray Series: Ruth Clifford and Jack Sheril (15 episodes) 31,000 
feet) ; (2 reels) : Sweethearts, Service Stripes, He's In Again, 
The Conquering Hero. 

LEE & BRADFORD 

Squirrel Comedies 
Canadian Travelogues 

PINNACLE COMEDIES 

(2 reels): Razzin' the Jazz, Why Change Your Mother-in Law t Nation's 
Dream, Shimmy Isle 

PLYMOUTH PICTURES 
Series of 5 two-reel Mrs. Roscoe Arbuckle Comedies 
Series of 12 one-reel Denver Dixon Comedies 

PACIFIC FILM COMPANY 
White Cap Comedies: Featuring George Ovey (Once-a-week) (1 reel). 
Newspaper Stories: Featuring Irene Hunt (Two-a-moiith) (2 reels). 
Vernon Dent Comedies: One-a-week (1 reel). 

PIONEER FILM CORP. 

The Facts and Follies Series (1 reel) 

Luke McLuke's Film-Osophy, each Yi reel. 

The Sonny Series, each 2 reels. 

Serial — The Hope Diamond Mystery (15 episodes). 

PRODUCERS SECURITY CORPORATION 

Irving Cummings Series 2,000 — 

Cissy Fitzgerald 2,000 

SACRED FILMS, INC. 
Sacred Films (1 reel) 

STOREY PICTURES. INC. 

Shadowland Screen Review (1 reel a week) 
Federated Screen Review (1 reel every 2 weeks) 
Burlesque Photoplays (2 reels a month) 
Shadowlafs (1 reel every 2 weeks) 
Kidkomedies (la month) 
Al Haynes Comedies (1 reel every 2 weeks) 









2f*BftADSTREET 
o/'RLMDOM 





IS 

READ 

EVERY 

M ORNING 




FROM COAST 
TO COAST 



FROM COVER 
TO COVER 



"One Week of Love from an 
audience viewpoint, is made 
on platinum and set with 
pearls" Film Daily, 

NoO. 12-'22. 



s~?*" 



S 



»i 



\ 









Lewis J. Selzhick presents 

ELAINE HAMMERSTEIN 
and CONWAY TEARLE 



''ONE WEEK 
OF LOVE" 

by Edward J. Montagne and Geo. Archainbaud 

Directed by George Archainbaud 

^Proiiuced by Myron Selznick 



iTHE 

tie BRADSTREET 
of FILMDOH 





ZfoRECOGMIZED 

Authority 







bl. XXIII No. 7 



Monday, January 8, 192; 



Price 5 Cents 



Evans Resigns 

'rom Eastern Penna. M. P. T. O. A. 
— Officers Nr -inated 

(Special to THE F [ DAILY) 

Philadelphia — J' S. Evans 

hrew a bombshell the meeting 

i the M. P. T. O. . of Eastern 
'enna. Friday when h -esigned from 
he board of managers and as a mem- 
ier of the organization. His resig- 
tation from the board of managers 
iras accepted, but the members pres- 
et would not consent to his leaving 
he association. 

Evans has been one of the leading 
igures in the activities of the Penna. 
>ranch of the exhibitors' league. He 
vas president of the local organiza- 
ion up to a year ago, and was, until 
ecently, national M. P. T. O. A. com- 
nitteeman from this district. He was 
i strong supporter of Sydney Cohen 
;or some time, but has recently dis- 
igreed with the latter on a number 
)f subjects. As noted, the two 
:lashed at the last meeting of the 
local association. 

It is most likely tha the resigna- 
tion of Evans at this time is guided 
by his desire not to embarrass Syd- 
ney Cohen and the national organ- 
ization and also not to hinder the 
progress of the incoming local offi- 
cers. 

New Officers Nominated 

The following were nominated for 
the various offices of the Penna. or- 
ganization, the formal election to take 
place on Jan. 19: 

President, Dr. H. J. Schad, Read- 
ing; Vice-Pres., William C. Hunt, 
Phila.; Second Vice-Pres., Floyd 
Hopkins, Harrisburg; Secretary, Geo. 
P. Aarons Phila.; Treasurer, William 
J. Butler, Phila.; Board of Managers, 
3 years each, George Kline, Harry 
Stephenson, Dr. Morris. 

Boyd Chamberlain was re-elected 
to the board of managers to fill the 
vacancy of John S. Evans, resigned. 



Cold 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Philadelphia — Many of the mem- 
bers of the M. P. T. O. A. of East- 
ern Penn. and Southern New Jersey 
are at the moment "cold" on the ques- 
tion of the national distribution idea 
or the booking association idea. They 
know too much of what happens with 
the Stanley Company. 
Correction 

In a report published recently rela- 
tive to the address of the Theater 
Owners' Distributing Corp. it was 
stated that these offices were in the 
same building with the headquarters 
of the National Exhibitor organiza- 
tion, the M. P. T. O. A. This is in- 
correct. The M. P. T. O. address is 
132 W. 43rd St., while the Theater 
Owners' Dis. Corp. offices are lo- 
cated at 25 W. 43rd St. 




The "Charles W. Morgan," oldest whaler in existence, on which "Down 
to the Sea in Ships," the new Hodkinson super-special, was filmed. In- 
set shows Raymond McKee in the crow's nest. — Advt. 



What's Wrong? 

Between 70 and 80 per cent of the exhibitors of this country 
are paving unfair prices for pictures. Lack of regulation as to 
methods ; exorbitant demands of the big buying powers, coupled 
with competitive conditions at varying points brings this about. 
And the great trouble is that in nearly all instances the exhibitors 
who can afford to pay the proper price don't and the load is 
passed on to the smaller houses who "pay the freight." If Hays 
can get started on straightening this out he can command the 
respect and attention of the exhibitors of this country instantly. 
But can he? 

Here's the situation in a nutshell: There are just two 
classes of pictures. No more ; no less. There are the big ones, 
which must gross somewhere from $350,000 up and the others. 
Now what happens? Well— but here's a story ; a fact It tells 
it all better than any argument that exists. In the Middle West 
the salesman of a certain company offered a socalled "big picture 
for a week to a first run house for $800. "Don't want it, said the 
exhibitor. "Besides there isn't such a thing as an $800 picture 
for this city. You should either get $2,000 for the week, or $40 
a dav We don't plav anything in between." That same cone i- 
tion'exists all over. Either you get "big money" or practically 
nothing. 

What is the result? Simply this : A producer puts, let's say, 
$60,000 in a picture. It just misses being "big. A distributing 
company releases it. The boys who have a regular $7.50 a day 
rate won't pay a nickel more. It isn't big enough. Here and 

(Continued on Page 4) 



China Development 

Important Americans as Well as 

Chinese Among Directors — 

Plans of Dragon Films 

Officers and directors of Dragon 
Films, Inc., a five million dollar cor- 
poration which plans to open up 
China for motion pictures, contains 
names of importance both to this 
country as well as China. 

The better known Americans in the 
corporation include Anthony J. Drex- 
el Biddle, Jr., a vice-president; James 
A. Thomas, vice-president and chair- 
man of the board, who has for over 
20 years been identified in the British 
and American Tobacco Co. in China; 
Charles T. Lark, who is trustee of the 
Mark Twain estate; Percy E. Mann, 
former president of the Eagle Soap 
Company; Morris R. Poucher and 
Charles A. Meade who together with 
Frank du Pont represent the du Pont 
interests, and Frank V. Chamberlain, 
probably the best known of all among 
film folk. Chamberlain was formerly 
with Famous Players and will be the 
general manager and assistant sec- 
retary of Dragon Films. 

The list also includes as President 
Chow TsuChi, who has probably held 
more cabinet positions than any other 
Chinese £nd who has been for years 
prominent in the finances of China. 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Selznick Offices to Coast? 

The report was confirmed Satur- 
day that the entire Selznick offices 
contemplate moving to the Coast 
some time in the Spring. 



It Pays 

Writes Louis O. Macloon, 
Morosco Prod.: 
Dear Danny: 

The old sheet pays. This 
morning I read of an electric 
light sign for rent on Broad- 
way. Just a piker two inch ad. 
But that was what I wanted. 
Investigation showed it was the 
"Douglas Fairbanks in Robin 
Hood" flash on the corner of 
45th and Broadway. Just next 
door to our theater. I closed 
the deal over the phone and on 
Monday night the sign will 
flash 

Oliver Morosco presents 
Leo Carillo 
in a new play 
"Mike Angelo" 
Morosco Theater Now 
One month $2500, cheap for 
me and let me say quick results 
for $8.00 spent with THE 
FILM DAILY. Now, you 
read the sign and spend $5 of 
that $8 for two seats. 







j mMMimLiKW ^ ■■-' ff'i"nr-?"r; 



Monday, January 8, 1923 




I ol. XXIII no. 7 Monday, Jan. 8. 1923 Price 5 Cents 

Copyright 1922, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc.. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 
J. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
ot Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00, Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 
CI icago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

\\ abash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau. Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
. .i . la ) , Wenzelsplat». 



(f- (QcLu&attirnaJt (J -Lctwi. 




Off to Europe 

Sydney Cohen of Los Angeles sail- 
ed on the Majestic Saturday for a 
brief trip abroad. 



China Development 

(Continued from Page 1) 

A number of important Chinese are 
.ncluded in the organization and it is 
anticipated that through the influence 
of these important citizens of China 
that the development work planned 
will be put through without di.ric uitj 

Messrs. Thomas and Chamberlain 
will leave New York in two weeks 
and plan to sail for China on Jan. 26. 
Headquarters will be wstablished at 
Shanghai, where incidentally an ex- 
change will be opened and a school 
where projection will be taught to 
1,000 Chinese youths. 

New York headquarters are tempo- 
rarily at the Bar Bldg., 36 W. 44th 
Street. 

Immediately upon their arrival in 
China preparatory work to the open- 
ng of 2,000 theaters will be begun. 
There are at present but 68 theaters 
in all of China and practically all of 
these ;.re in what are known as the 
treaty ports. 

traduction will also be started im- 
mediately upon the arrival of Cham- 
berlain and for the first time in the 
history of the screen some of the rel- 
ics and antiques of old China will be 
shown in a production which will in 
all likelihood be made in color. At 
first all productions made in China 
will be of an educational nature. 

Chamberlain is working day and 
night looking at film and he antici- 
pates having SO complete programs 
including a scenic, comedy and a feat- 
ure ready when he sails. He antici- 
pates needing 200 complete programs 
at the start. All productions will be 
retitled in Chinese. 

About 2000 theaters or places where 



pictures will be shown are expected 
to be developed within the next three 
years. There are 430 million people 
in China and 5800 cities of a popula- 
tion of 20,000 or more. Motion pic- 
tures are practically unknown 
throughout 80 per cent of China. At 
present Chinese Theaters, Ltd., Ra- 
mos, and France and Goullette con- 
trol the distribution of pictures in 
China and between them practically 
control the 68 theaters. 



JUPITER FILM CORP. 

1482 Broadway 

New York 

We buy right! only for entire 

Latin America. 



Mfflwwitig i 



MADE TO ORDER 



Commercial Developing and Printing 



1339- 51 D1VERSEY PAftKWAV - CHICAGO, US A. 



CHAS. 0. BAUMANN, 



Pret, 



RESOURCES - $5,000,000 
— LEGAL RATES — 



PRODUCERS & STARS 

represented. Also every form of 
financial service rendered in connec- 
tion therewith — at legal ratns. 



GREAT NORTHERN FINANCE CORP, 

Knickerbocker Building 

Broadway at 42nd Street, N. Y. City 
Telephone Bryant 2989 



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THE 



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DAILY 



Monday, January 8, 1923 



What's Wrong? 

(Continued from Page 1) 

there come spasmodic bookings at better figures. But generally 
speaking the $7.50 price holds. What happens? The picture 
grosses less than it cost to make. The producer is sick. 

Gentlemen, what are you going to do about it? 
TALK OF CLOSING HOUSES 

From the Northwest come reports of poor business. One 
of the biggest operators in that section is talking of closing over 
a third of his houses. "Rotten business" is his only comment. 
"Too many seats?" he was questioned. "Perhaps," he said, 
"but in addition film rentals are higher today than ever in history. 
The prices we paid during the high water level of 1920 are a 
joke as compared to what we are being asked — and what we have 
to pay — today. It started with 'The Sheik.' Since then it has 
been a succession of prices that knock you cold. And you can't 
gel out of the red." 

THE PRODUCER'S SIDE 

So with this kick aboard a big producer was asked about 
things. He didn't like the idea of talking. "Perhaps prices are 
high," he admitted, "but what can you do about it?" Salaries of 
stars are soaring. Directors are asking the earth. Sam Gold- 
wyn is giving Fitzmaurice about three or four times what he got 
from Famous. Others after Fitzmaurice offered twice as much 
as his old contract. Valentino has enough offers to sink a 
ship. At five, ten times what Famous has him for. Schenck 
can leave First National any day. He can get a better offer for 
the Talmadge's anytime. Is First National making anv money 
with the Talmadge girls? Ask any of the big men in First Na- 
tional. And print what they say — if they'll say anything. 

"What brings it about? Exhibitors. They'll outbid each 
other all the time. They always have. They always will. Look 
at Fox. Giving Hearst somewhere between $40,000 and $50,000 
for 'Knighthood.' Bucking the ABC who gave Abrams $60,000 
for 'Tess.' That's the way it goes. It always will. And as 
long as they boost prices why should they kick?" 

So there you are, And you're just where you started. But 
something's got to happen. 

NICKELS AND DIMES 

And here's what it must be. According to Ricord Gradwell. 
"We've lost our prospective," says he. "This business was built 
on nickels and dimes. They made a fortune for people in the 
early days. True ; that was before the palaces were built and be- 
fore everybody thought they had to spend a hundred thousand on 
every picture. You can do a lot with nickels and dimes. If 
you don't believe it look at the Woolworth Building. It was 
built with them. And from them. Exhibitor's will tell you they 
can't afford to reduce rentals. I'd rather reduce rentals than 
wave the sheriff's flag. Let some of those who say it can't be 
done try it. Sandwich in a popular priced night. See what 
happens. You can't run the big houses for Saturday and Sunday 
business alone. An empty seat is a challenge. To fill them. It 
isn't the pictures because they are better than ever. It's simply 
that the family can't afford to go at 40 or 50 cents a head. And 
there are usually four or five to the family. It takes too much 
away from shoes and stockings and food. Let's get back where 
we belong. And everybody will be better off." 

THAT LYNCH DEAL 

Sure a big one. Some millions involved. And Harold Frank- 
lin will get a chance to show something. Looks like a lot of 
theaters down South, will pass to other hands. Just as Frank- 
lin did in New England. Turned the Black string from a loss. 
To a gain. Pretty smart operator — that boy. It's the old story. 
You can't keep a good showman down. And Franklin is a good 
showman. Ask Mike Shea. 

And Lynch gets out of pictures. Except for his stock in 
Famous. It's a lot, they say. Everybody feels happy. Kent 
included. Who can now run the exchanges as he wants to. 
And that's that. 

DANNY. 



W. W. H0DKINS0N 



Do You Want 



S 



uccess 



For 1923 
? 



Every Exhibitor 
Wants It 



iTHE 

7Ae BRADSTREET 
of FILMDOM 





ZfcRECOGMIZEB 

Authority 




lo\. XXIII No. 8 



Tuesday, January 9, 1923 



Price 5 Cents 



2,000 Reissues 

iarry Aitken and Oscar ice Buy 
Old Triangle Output fc State 
Rights Distributic 

Harry E. Aitken, former .icial of 
rriangle, has re-entered th business 
is partner of Oscar Price n a new 
:ompany known as Tri-Stone Pic- 
ures, Inc. 

According to Mr. Price, the com- 
>any has bought from Percy L. 
Abaters, former president of Triangle 
md from Hy Winik, the entire 
lomestic and foreign rights to the 
rriangle output both features and 
:omedies which, in the total, aggre- 
gate about 2,000 negatives. Price 
itated yesterday that the company 
ntended reissuing this vast amount 
)f product in bulk, and that the 
nedium chosen was the state right 
ield. 

The features in the list include 
>roductions which achieved a marked 
legree of success when originally re- 
eased. They include productions 
tarring Douglas Fairbanks, the Gish 
listers, William S. Hart, Charles Ray, 
Raymond Hitchcock, Dorothy Dal- 
on, Louise Glaum, Bessie Barris- 
:ale, Gloria Swanson, and many 
)thers. 

The plan calls for the release 
irst of a series of 12 two-reel Key- 
stone comedies, which will be avail- 
able in the near future. The pictures 
will be re-edited in their entirety be- 
iore released. 

One portion of the business will 
:over sales of the motion picture 
rights to other producers. It is 
understood that the old Triangle 
:ompany held rights to a number of 
vehicles which were never produced. 




Gasnier Here 

L. J. Gasnier, one of the featured 
directors of Preferred Pictures re- 
leasing through Al Lichtman, arrived 
in town yesterday from Los Angeles. 
He is at the Astor for 10 days. 



Ordynsky To Make "The Exciters" 
Richard Ordynsky, who was sign- 
ed by Famous Players a few months 
ago will direct "The Exciters," in 
which Bebe Daniels will have the 
leading role. The picture will be 
made in the East. 



Leave on Foreign Missions 
Cresson E. Smith, former United 
Artists manager in Chicago, leaves 
on the SS. Ventura from San Fran- 
cisco on Jan. 23, for Austral'a where 
he will remain for some time. H. 
Wayne Pierson, one of Paul La- 
zarus' assistant sales managers, left 
on Saturday for the Far East. 

E. J. Eichenlaub has succeeded 
Smith in Chicago. 



"Secrets of Paris," presented by Mastodon Films Inc., did a bigger Sun- 
day business than any attraction at B . S. Moss' Cameo theater in many 
months. "Peacock Alley," with Mae Murray making a personal appear- 
ance one year ago, beat it by only $1 60. "Secrets of Paris" topped "Sure 
Fire Flint" by three hundred dollars, and will undoubtedly hang up a 
record for the week. — Advt. 



Mary in "Faust" 

Postpones "Dorothy Vernon" to 
Make Classic— Lubitsch Will Di- 
rect Production 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Mary Pickford's next 
vehicle will be "Faust" which Ernest 
Lubitsch will direct. 

It was Miss Pickford's plan to 
make "Dorothy Vernon of Haddon 
Hall" next but the production has 
been postponed until summer. 



Dennis O'Brien, Miss Pickford's 
adviser stated yesterday that he had 
not heard definitely that the produc- 
tion of "Faust" had been decided 
upon. At United Artists, the pub- 
licity department said that the coast 
report was correct. 

It was recalled yesterday that D. 
W. Griffith had planned a production 
of "Faust" but that he had changed 
his mind because of expected difficul- 
ties with censors. 



Vidor's First For Goldwyn 

King Vidor's first production under 
his Goldwyn contract will be "Three 
Wise Fools." 



5 Millions in Deal 

Papers in Lynch-Famous Players 

Transaction to be Signed This 

Week 

A special dispatch to The New 
York Times from Atlanta says, in 
part: 

"For a sum reported to be $5,700,- 
000, the S. A. Lynch Enterprise Corp. 
has surrendered management of the 
Southern Enterprises, Inc., and its 
subsidiary corporations, to the Fa- 
mous Players-Lasky Corp. 

"Final contracts and agreements 
covering this, one of the biggest busi- 
ness deals ever consummated in the 
South, will be signed early next week 
and the agreement is made retroactive 
as of Jan. 1. 

"It is also understood that the new 
President of Southern Enterprises, 
Inc., will be Frederick G. Lee, former 
President of the Irwin Trust Co. of 
New York and at present chairman of 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Duncans Arrive 
Wm. Duncan and his wife arrived 
yesterday, accompanied by E. L. 
Moriartv, a Los Angeles newspaper- 
man. At the Algonquin. 



Ind'p'ts Lined Up 

Coast Producers Seek Los Angeles 

District Attorney for Position 

Similar to That of Will Hays 

(Special I.. I UK FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles— At midnight, New 
York time, a number of independent 
producers on the coast were holding 
a meeting here at which plans were 
discussed for the formation of an or- 
ganization of independents similar to 
the one which is headed by Will H. 
Hays. 

Credence is placed in local circles 
in the report that Thomas Lee Wool- 
wine, district attorney of Los An- 
geles and unsuccessful Democratic 
nominee for governor is slated to 
head the new body at a salary of 
$100,000 a year. The tentative name 
of the organization is the Independent 
Producing Managers' Association but 
its personnel is being guarded care- 
fully at the moment. 

It is understood that Herman L. 
Roth, an attorney is largely instru- 
mental in perfecting the necessary ar- 
rangements. 



Zukor Passes 50th Birthday 
Adolph Zukor was the guest of 
honor at a dinner given at Del- 
monico's Sunday evening by execu- 
tives and department heads of Fa- 
mous Players in honor of his fiftieth 
birthday. John C. Flinn presided as 
toastmaster. 



Woods Returns to Hollywood 
Frank Woods, formerly with Fa- 
mous at Hollywood, left for the coast 
yesterday. It is understood that Mr. 
Woods plans to produce his own pic- 
tures in association with several other 
men recently resigned from Famous 
and other companies on the coast. 



Loew Takes Over the Astoria 

The Loew circuit officially took 
over the Astoria last night. The occa- 
sion was marked by the appearance 
there of Marcus Loew, Rex Ingram, 
Alice Terry, Lewis Stone and Ramon 
Navarro. The theater started run- 
ning Loew vaudeville yesterday, re- 
placing Shubert units. 



Lesser Buys Vidor Studio 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY - ) 

Los Angeles — Sol Lesser, president 
of Principal Pictures has purchased 
the Vidor studio on which $100,000 
will be spent in improvements. Prin- 
cipal will make 12 features there and 
space will be leased to other pro- 
ducers. 

Western Pictures Exploitation Co. 
has been absorbed by the new Lesser 
unit of which Irving Lesser is vice- 
president and Mike Rosenberg, sec- 
retary and treasurer. 



THE 




Tuesday, January 9, 1923 



B3BS&2££, 



C@23 




10I. XXIII Wo. 8 Tuesday, Jan. 9, iH/3 Price 5 Cents 

Copyright 1925, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc.. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. V., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 
J. \V. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y„ under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
ot Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
' N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollvwood 
1603. 
CI icago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmsehau, Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
ikia), Wenielaplats. 

Quotations 

High Low Close Sales 

East. Kod. 98^ 94*4 98 5,000 

F. P.-L. . . 90^ 89% 90^ 1,500 

do pfd. . 98y 2 98V 4 98^ 200 

Li'wyn ... 6% 6y s 6% 600 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's . . . 19% 19% 19% 2,200 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 

After "Backbone" Exteriors 

Howard Estabrook left yesterday 
afternoon for Woodstock, Vt., where 
exteriors for "Backbone" will be shot. 
Henry M. Hobart, vice-president of 
Distinctive and the company leave 
later in the week. 



BEST THEATRES EVERYWHERE 

are using the following ad. mats in their 

newspaper advertising 



BIG ADDED LAUGH 

HAZEL FftOM HOLLYWOOD" 

DOROTHY DEVORE e/iristioComedu 

$?1 THE MOVIES KIO THtlM5£L>'--5 




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"An Inch in time draws nine" 

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TITLES 



NEGATIVE 
POSITIVE 
Incl. CARDS 

15 CENTS PER FOOT 

24 Hour Service if necessary 

SIMPLEX TITLE SHOP 

220 W. 42d Street Bryant 0985 



5 Millions in Deal 

(Continued from Page 1) 

the finance committee of the Famous 
Players-Lasky Corp. A supervising 
executive to represent Mr. Lee and 
Mr. Franklin will probably be sent to 
Atlanta shortly. 

Financial arrangements of the deal 
involve payment to the S. A. Lynch 
Finance Corporation of a large 
royalty over a period of years. 



The above dispatch occasioned no 
comment from the Famous . Players 
offices. 

The first report of this transaction 
appeared exclusively in The Film 
Daily last Thursday. 



Traub With Ruby 

Joe Traub, former assistant to Nat 
Levine of Plymouth Pictures, is now 
connected with the Ruby Film Co. 



Back Into Pictures 

Ann Pennington who has been ap- 
pearing in vaudeville, it is understood, 
is about to form a company which 
will star in a series of pictures. If 
the plan goes through, production will 
be on the coast. 



"Watty" Coming East 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Chicago — Watterson R. Rothacker 
left here yesterday for a ten day 
stay at the New York office. 

John G. Halm, secretary of the 
Rothacker Film Mfg. Co., returns to 
Chicago the last of January. He has 
been installing; a service system at 
the Hollywood plant. 

"Three Openings" 

"The Third Alarm," an F. B. O. 
release, opened for a four weeks' run 
at the Astor theater last night. 

"Hunting Big Game in Africa With 
Gun and Camera" started an engage- 
ment at the Lyric. 

Martin Johnson's "The Head 
Hunters of the South Seas," opened 
at the Broadway yesterday. 



On Broadway 

This Week 
Astor— "The Third Alarm." 
Broadway — "Headhunters of the 

South Seas." 
Brooklyn Strand— "Kick In." 
Cameo— "Secrets of Paris." 
Capitol— "One Week of Love." 
Criterion — "Salome." 
Loew's New York — Today — "Quincy 
Adams Sawyer." 
Tuesday — "Smudge" and "Why 

Justice Waits." 
Wednesday — "Only a Shopgirl." 
Thursday — "Making a Man." 
Friday- — "The Super Sex" and 

"Boss of Camp Four." 
Saturday — "Pride of the Palomar." 
Sunday— "Call of the Sea." 
Rialto — "My American Wife." 
Rivoli — "When Knighthood Was in 

Flower." 
Strand — "One Exciting Night." 



Next Week 
Astor— "The Third Alarm." 
Brooklyn Strand — "One Exciting 

Night." 
Capitol — Not yet determined. 
Criterion — "Salome." 
Rialto — Not yet determined. 
Rivoli — Not yet determined. 
Strand— "Omar the Tentmaker." 



Exhibitors to Vote on Arbuckle 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Richmond — Virginia exhibitors will 
have their patrons vote as to showing 
Arbuckle pictures in their state. 

"White Fang," Trimble's Next 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Larry Trimble's 
next picture for First National will 
be "White Fang," a Jack London 
story, in which Strongheart the dog 
will be featured. 



Julian Plans Napoleonic Film 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — It is understood that 
Rupert Julian is planning a Napoleon- 
ic film, to follow "Merry Go Round." 

The new picture bears the tentative 
title of "His Royal Divorce." 



There was considerable mystery at 
the Universal offices yesterday over 
the above report. No one seemed to 
know about it but at the. same time 
no one in authority cared to register 
a denial. 



Ohio M. P. T. O. to Meet 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Columbus— The Ohio M. P. T. O. 
will meet Jan. 16-17. 



CHAS. 0. BAUMANN, p re 

RESOURCES - $5, COO, OOO 
— LEGAL RATES — 



PRODUCERS & STARS 

represented. Also every form of 
financial service rendered in connec- 
tion therewith — at legal ratrs. 



GREAT NORTHERN FINANCE CORP. 

Knickerbocker Building 

Broadway at 42nd Street, N. Y. City 
Telephone Bryant 2989 




yln Invitation 
To Directors— 



WHAT'S YOUR 
*-^ BIG IDEA? 

I believe that every director has a pet 
hobby — some favorite script or story 
that he has long wanted to make — one 
that he has felt sure could be picturized 
into an excellent attraction. 

I feel certain that among these hun- 
dreds of ideas there must be many that 
are really and truly great ! If they are, 
I want to see and hear of them. If they 
are worth while making, I will help you 
make them. 

So I extend this invitation — if you 
have any story or theme that you believe 
could be made into a great picture, let 
me hear from you. It is possible that 
your particular hobby may contain 
enough originality in plot and form to 
make the very scenario I am looking 
for. Let me hear from you. 




UNIVERSAL PICTURES CORP. 

1600 Broadway, New York City 



THE 



Tuesday, January 9, 1923 

■■nuHn 




Newspaper Opinions 

"Secrets of Paris"— C. C. Burr 
Cameo 

IMERICAN — * * * An absorbing version 
Eugene Sue's masterpiece, at the Cameo 
iter. * * * The play is given a cast that 
re nearly approaches the "all star" boast 
n is usual. * * * The photography is as 
id as the acting, and that is splendid. 
"RIISUXE — If we were a producer we 
uld immediately send for William Collier. 

* * * His performance in "Secrets of 
■is." at the Cameo theater, convinces us 
t whoever gets him is a lucky producer. 
* As Sue's story is presented on the 
een it is a rousing melodrama. * * * 
litm.-ui Bennett loves to produce melo- 
mas, hut he has the good sense to tern- ' 

them with fine acting. All of the parts 
■e sanely played. 

riMES — It will seem rather a wild and 
redible melodrama that makes Up in in- 
mittent intensity what it lacks in conti- 
ty and persuasiveness. Dorothy Farnum, 

prepared the adaptation, seems to have 
empted to put too much of the printed 
ry into the film. * * * But the exciting 
ties, in themselves, hold the attention. 
r one thing, they are intensified by a num- 

of stirring, if overdrawn, impersonations. 
MfAIL — * * * Is a thoroughly entertain- 

1 picture. Sue's book is full of the sort 
material precisely suited to the screen, and 

scenario by Dorothy Farnum takes full 
/antage of it. Good direction is coupled 
h an unusually able cast. * * * 
rELEGRAM— All the thrills that go to 
ke up life in the Paris underworld are 
-eeled in the story. * * * 
jLOBE — It is one of those old time melo- 
imatic thrillers that Dad gladly paid his 
t thirty cents to see. * * * It has been 
nished with an unusually fine cast and is 
>duced with exceptional taste. 
3UN — * * * An unusuallv exciting melo- 
ima. * * * 



Desmond's Double Killed 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Doubling for Wil- 
liam Desmond in an aeroplane, Jean 
Perkins, "stunt" man was killed here 

recently. 



Wins Verdict Against Hostettler 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

. . Omaha — Suit of George Munroe, 

former operator of the Gilbert Thea- 
ter, Beatrice, against the Hostettler 
Amus. Co. to recover a loan of $20,- 
000 which Munroe made, has been 
decided in favor of Munroe, with a 
verdict of $21,925. 

Munroe alleges that the theater 
company promised to pay the loan on 
demand but to date they had only 
paid $2,000 of the amount. 



Zeidman With Sacramento Pictures 

(Special to I II E I ILM DULY) 

Hollywood — Bennie Zeidman who 
has just finished making "The Spider 
and the Rose" will be in charge of 
production of Sacramento Pictures 
Corp. of which Wm. H. Jobclmann 
will be general manager. Lambert 
Hillyer will direct their first "Tempo- 
rary Marriage" in which Kenneth 
Harlan and Mildred Davis will ap- 
pear. 



FOR SALE 

Screen Rights to Edward Marshall's 
famous story 



BAT 



Guts and Flashes 

Mary Alden, is working on Burton 
King's new picture. 



"The Garden of Desire" is being 
produced by Whitman Bennett with 
Betty Blythe. 



Receiver Asked For 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Cincinnati. O.— Attorney Edward 
:cker has been appointed receiver 
r the Theater Amus. Co., operating 
e Boulevard at Canal and Vine Sts. 



Louis J. Pruch. formerly of the 
Vaughn Construction Co., has join- 
ed the production forces of Home's 
Exploitation Service. 



Alma Tell, Louis Wolheim, and 
Elizabeth Murray, have been added 
to the cast in support of Marion 
Davies in "Little Old New York." 



The Hebrew Sheltering House 
League, New York City, will hold 
their 25th annual entertainment and 
dance at the Waldorf Feb. 17. 



Great Story and Title. 
Published and Copyrighted 1912. 

SCHUYLER C. HODGE 
522 Fifth Ave. Room 707 New York 



YOU DON'T HAVE TO 
TELL THE WORLD 

We appreciate how a great 
many business men feel about 
discussing their financial affairs. 
You will find our service con- 
fidential, sympathetic, speedy 
and effective. Bring your 
problem to us. We specialize 
in financing film propositions. 

CHROMOS TRADING CO. 

1123 Broadway 

Suite 616 'Phone Cheliei 8284 



Phone— Beekman 9091 



ALLEN THEATRE, 
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THE SUPER 39 ■ 

The Nth Commandment 

By Fannie Hurst 



>) 




Scenario by Frances Marion Directed by Frank Borzage 

A Cosmopolitan Production 

Released March 18th 




THE same trio that made "Humoresque" 
author, director and scenario writer, 
working in complete co-operation, have pro- 
duced another triumph of heart-appeal in 
"The Nth Commandment." It is a story of 
the simple lives that Fannie Hurst knows so 
well, with as much laughter and tears and 
drama as "Humoresque." 



"Dark Secrets." 
"My American Wife." 
"Drums of Fate." 
"Nobody's Money." 
'Adam's Rib." 



The great cast includes Colleen Moore, 
James Morrison, Eddie Phillips, Charlotte 
Merriam, and James Cooper. This picture 
has the kind of appeal that always means big 
money at the box-office, and is certain to 
rank as one of the big ones of the season. 




•AFAMOUS PLAYERSLASKY CORPORATION Ml 

J , ADOLOH ZUKOB 0-...*.* . UjBI 




No. 7 
No. 8 
No. 9 
No. 10 



"Java Head." 

"The White Flower.' 
"Adam and Eva." 
"Racing Hearts" 



ma 



(2 Cparamount Qidure 



WATCH THIS 

SPACE 

TOMORROW 

FOR 

No. 12 



THE 



-JXIK. 



DAILV 



Tuesday, January 9, 1923 



In the Courts 

Supreme Court Justice Gavegan 
has signed an injunction in a suit of 
the Fairmount Films against Metro 
and Loew's, Inc., restraining the de- 
fendants from using the title "Hate" 
for a film pending the trial of the suit 
by the plaintiff to prove its owner- 
ship of the title because of prior use 
of the same. 



Supreme Court Justice Ford has 
signed an order dismissing the suit 
of the Standard Film Service Co., 
against the Stoll Film Co., Ltd., on 
the ground that the action has been 
dismissed previously against the 
Alexander Film Co., and the court 
stated at that time that the contract 
could not be enforced against the 
Stoll Co. 



Supreme Court Justice Gavegan 
has signed a temporary injunction in 
a suit of John Rounan against the 
Chester Pictures, Inc., restraining it 
from offering for sale any negative 
in competition with him in the sale 
and distribution of pictures of the 
chimpanzee known as "Snooky," 
either under the titles, "The Jungle 
Romeo," "Bluebeard of the Jungle" 
or any other title. The case will be 
heard later. 



Lusk in Washington 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Washington — Walter E. Lusk, 
formerly in the Cleveland office, is 
now in charge of First National Pic- 
tures Exchange here. 



Frankle Leaves Blank 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Des Moines, la. — Abe Frankle has 
withdrawn from the Des Moines 
Theater Co., headed by A. H. Blank; 
retaining sole interest in the Casino 
and remaining in charge of the houses 
at Cedar Falls, Creston, Albia, and 
Leon. 



Wilmer and Vincent Protest 

The following communication has 
been received from Walter Vincent, 
of Wilmer & Vincent. 

"Editor Film Daily : In the issue of your 
'Daily' of the 27th ult. there appeared an 
article, which seriously reflects upon this 
company. 

"We realize that the function of a news- 
paper is to supply news to its readers, but 
is it news if it is not the truth? Your in- 
formant as to the Victoria Theater at Har- 
risburg, Pa., has himself been misinformed 
or else he has misrepresented to you. 

"In the first place, Wilmer and Vincent 
never cast longing eyes on the Victoria 
Theater. At the time that the Messrs. 
George owned and operated it, we were in 
friendly competition, and never even con- 
sidered making purchase of their property. 
At the conclusion of the European War they 
decided that they wanted to return to Greece 
— offered the house for sale, naming a price. 
There were a number of individuals who 
were willing to buy, but their initial payment 
offer did not interest the Messrs. George. 

"One day, they came to us with the prop- 
osition that if we would make purchase, they 
would take a very small first payment — 
thereafter the transaction was consummated. 
The theater under our management has been 
operated at a profit and until the industrial 
and financial depression became so marked 
in Pennsylvania, at a very large profit. 

"It is difficult for us to understand why 
you felt it within your province to make 
publication in the first place, of an article 
reflecting upon our management, of any thea- 
ter. Since you have done so, we trust you 
will make publication of the substance of 
this communication, as a matter of simple 
justice." 



Reproductive quality enables the sensitive 
emulsion to correctly portray every step of 
gradation from highest light to deepest 
shadow. 

EASTMAN 
POSITIVE ^FILM 

faithfully reproduces evrry tcne of the 
negative. It carries the quality through 
to the screen. 

Eastman Film, both regular and tinted base — 
now available in nine colors, is identified through- 
out its length by the words "Eastman" "Kodak" 
stenciled in black letters in the transparent margin. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



P. A. POWERS 



Do You Want 

Success 

For 1923 

? 



Every Exhibitor 
Wants It 



See Thursday's Film Daily 



jTHE 

7Ae BRADSTREET 
of FILMDOM 





jfomocmm 
Authority 




Vol. XXIII No. 9 



Wednesday, January 10, 1923 



Price 5 Cent^ 



Famous Signs Dwan 

Director of "Robin Ho<- 1 " Will Make 
Series — Herbert Brc l to Make 

Compson Fea -es 
Famous Players aim :ed yester- 
day that Allan Dwan, ■ >e last pic- 
ture was "Robin Hood s been en- 
gaged to direct a series pecial pro- 
ductions, the first of \ h will be 
"Lawful Larceny." These pictures 
will be released as Allan Dwan Prod, 
and advertised like other director 
series of the Paramount organization. 
Edmund Goulding has been signed 
to adapt the play. Altbouerh no men- 
tion was made of this by Paramount, 
it would not prove surprising if Ho e 
Hampton appeared in the leading ro' :. 
Dwan is now finishing "The Glimps :s 
of the Moon." 

(Continued on pace 3) 



Smith's Leave for Coast 

Albert E. Smith of Vitagraph. and 
his wife, Jean Paige, left yesterday 
for the coast. 



A. B. C. Gets "Ninety and Nine" 
It is understood that the A. B. C. 

has secured Vitagraph's "Ninety and 

Nine" for earlv release. 



Universal's Dividend 
Stock holders of Universal at a 
meeting yesterday voted to declare 
a stock dividend of 450 per cent. 



Bill to Repeal Censors 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Albany — Assemblyman Cuvilier, in- 
troduced a bill in the Assembly yes- 
terday for the repeal of the censors. 
Senator James J. Walker will intro- 
duce his bill in the Senate in a few 
days. 



The Troubles of an 
Exhibitor 

Pneumonia Nev 
Dear Sir Film Daily: 

Well the convention's over. And 
like all of these things, we did what 
we expected and accomplished noth- 
ing. Dandruff and Fxzema with- 
drew from our league, but Split Lip 
came in and we are expecting an ex- 
hibitor from Musculary, Idaho, so 
that we still have ten members O. K. 

Our dinner after the convention 
was about the wittiest affair ever 
pulled out here. 

Bevans of Chafed, made the open- 
ing address. When he finished the 
repartee started and continued all 
evening. Bevans said "Friends we 
are gathered here for the purpose of 
improving our condition. (Applause"). 
We must look ahead to the day when 
exhibitors will run the business," 

(Continued on Page 6) 




The exact moment when a 90-ton whale turned on his pursuers in mid- 
Atlantic and overthrew whale-boat and crew in shark-infested waters. An 
instant of breath-catching suspense in the new Hodkinson super-special, 
"Down to the Sea in Ships."— Advt. ___^ == 



Proposed Contract 

Formulated By C. P. M. A. In 
England — May Prove Sugges- 
tive Here 
Below will be found the terms of a 
proposed contract presented by the 
C. P. M. A. for use between English 
exhibitors and Film renters (distrib- 
utors). This may prove of interest 
here in view of the difficulty which 
has developed between the Hays or- 
ganization and the several exhibitor 
bodies with reference to a proposed 
standard form of contract. 

Terras of New Contract 

The following are the terms of the new film 
contract between exhibitors and renters put 
forward by the C. P. M. A. A full report of 
the meeting at which the contract was dis- 
cussed appears on page 34. Mr. W. H. 
Huish also discusses the subject in his weekly 
article : 

(1) MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT 

entered into the day of 

19.. between 

of hereinafter named the 

Renter of the one part and 

of theater herein- 
after named the Hirer of the other part. 

(2) WHEREBY the said Renter agrees to 

let to the said Hirer for 

Exhibition Rights (run) at 

theater the film known as 

and entitled the 

approximate length of the film being 

feet, for a period of 

days, commencing the day 

of 19 for the sum of 

pounds, say ( £, )• 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Offer to Cohen 

Independent Producers Approached 
M. P. T. O. President on Distri- 
bution — No Confirmation 
Locally 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los' Angeles — Herman L. Roth, the 
attorney who is credited with being 
the important figure in the movement 
to combine independent producers in 
an organization similar to the Hays 
movement said yesterday that he had 
submitted a producing plan to Sydney 
S. Cohen, president of tin- M. P. T. O. 
and that he had received a receptive 
; i sponse from Cohen. 

The meeting scheduled for Monday 
night was held in Roth's office. Those 
present included Nat Spitzer. John P. 
McCarthy, John B. O'Brien. James 
Young John Ince, Roy Clemens, 
Eugene Kaufman, W. D. Russell, and 
a representative of Louis Burston. 
Nothing definite was decided upon at 
the meeting. 

Thomas Lee Woolwine, as noted. 
has been offered the position as head 
of the organization but lie lias told 
Roth that until the plan had been 
evolved in a more definite form, he 
could not make a decision. In film 
circles, here, the movement is not be- 
ing considered seriously. 



Unauthorized 

Gianinni So Describes Statement Re- 
garding His Activities With 
Valentino 

Dr. A. H. Gianinni, of the Bank 
of Italy, who has been on the Coast 
for the holidays, returned yesterday 
to New York. 

When informed of the reports 
published that it was anticipated that 
he would make an effort to settle 
the Valentino case with Famous 
Players so that Valentino's pictures 
might be released through J. D. Wil- 
liams, the Doctor declared that any 
such statement was without founda- 
tion of fact and that any statement 
regarding his interest in Valentmo 
was without foundation. 

The following communication has 
been received from Arthur Butler 
Graham, Valentino's counsel: 

"There is no foundation whatever for ar- 
ticles in certain trade papers reporting a 
rumored settlement between Rodolph Valen 
tino and Famous Players-Lasky Corp. 

'•Mr. Valentino's speeches over the radio 
to mil ions of people, and his articles pub- 
isl^d i motion picture magazines show 
"hat he is fighting for a principle, and is 
fighting to the finish. 

-There has been no final determinanon 
of the action in the equity court. Frepara 
?ions are being made to try the case when 
reached, and the evidence will Be ivir. 
Valentino's complete justification for his 
present self-denial and courageous resist- 
ance." 



Owing to the death of his mother. 
Sydney Cohen was not in his office 
yesterdav. No information was ob- 
tainable relative to the Roth tele- 
gram. When W. A. True, president 
of the recently formed Theater Own- 
ers Distributing Corp. was asked 
about it, he said his first information 
was obtained from the coast dispatch 
appearing in yesterday's issue. 



Sydney Cohen's Mother Buried 
Mrs. Annie Cohen, mother of 
Sydney S. Cohen was laid to rest 
vesterday. 

At the T. O. C. C. meeting yester- 
day, a resolution of sympathy was 
passed and forwarded to Cohen. 

Famous in Portland 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Portland. Maine— It is reported 
here that Famous Players will erect 
a large house at High and Congress 
Sts. to be readv early in the Fall. 

The Strand. formerly of the 
Mitchel string was taken over by the 
Goodsides who now have Portland 
practically "sewed up." The Black 
chain held an option on ground here 
and after Famous failed to secure 
the Strand it is claimed that Good- 
sides have made it difficult for Fa- 
mous. This is probably the basis 
for the circulation of the report that 
Famous intends building here. 

No one in the Famous Players 
home office would discuss the Port- 
land report or situation yesterday. 




KOI. XXIII Nq. 9 Wednesday, Jan. 10, 1923 Price 5 Cents 

Copyright 1923, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 
J. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00 : 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 
Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau, Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
vakia), Wenzclaplata. 



Quotations 

High Low Close Sale* 

East. Kod. 98^ 94J4 98 5,000 

F. P.-L. . . 90J4 89J^ 90H 1,500 

v do pfd. . 98^ 98^4 98^ 200 

"G'wyn ... 6J4 6V» &A 600 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's ... 19^ 193/6 19$^ 2,200 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 



Elsa Fuller has just returned from 
Germany, where she appeared in 
five productions. 



u (£k£uc*x£lcrrui£ U-tctu/i£A^ 




-m 



JUPITER FILM CORP. 

1482 Broadway 

New York 

We buy rights only for entire 

Latin America. 



NEGATIVE TITLES 

10 cents per foot, including cards. 
Through our revolutionizing process 
wo give you, choice of 10 high class 
hand lettered alphabets. The highest 
class illustrations. 24 hour service. 

TITLEGRAPH STUDIOS 

203 West 49th St. Circle 10,056 

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Properly Present Your Photoplay 



THE 



-e&Hk 



DAILV 



Wednesday, January 10, 1923 



At Broadway Theaters 

Capitol 

"Light Cavalry" and "The Capitol 
March," played by the Capitol orchestra, 
opens the bill, followed by the regular 
Capitol Weekly News, a Ballet Divertisse- 
ment by Doris Niles, Thalia Zanou and 
Blanche O'Donohue ; and "The Natural 
Horn Liar,'' a short reel. Evelyn Herbert 
and Frederick Jagel sings "Because," the 
feature is "One Week of Love," with 
Elaine Hammerstein and Conway Tearle. 
Nadia Reisenberg makes her debut at the 
piano, rendering "Scherzo," from "Con- 
certo Symphonique." "A Stone Age Romeo," 
the latest Aesop Film Fable, and organ 
selections, close the program. 



Cameo 

"Favorite Minuets," the overture; "Even- 
ing Star." played by John Priest, at the 
organ; A musical prologue, "Voices of 
Paris" ; and finale selections on the organ 
are the current musical numbers. The 
weekly pictorial is the second unit, followed 
by a short scenic reel, "Arcadian Meadows." 
The feature is C. C. Burr's "Secrets of 
Paris." 



Rialto 

The overture is "Robespierre" and Riesen- 
feld's Classical Jazz. The Rialto Magazine 
and "Daddy Long Legs," a musical film 
follows. Joseph Allesie renders a trumpet 
virtuoso. The feature is "My American 
Wife." starring Gloria Swanson. "Chopin- 
iana," by the Serova Dancers and Lloyd 
Hamilton in "The Speeder," corrrplete the 
bill. 



Rivoli 



The overture is the only extra number of 
the program this week, because of the 
length of "Knighthood," the feature. 



Strand 



The Strand Topical Review is the first 
number. A prelude to the feature, "One 
Exiting Night" is next, followed by several 
selections rendered by the orchestra. An 
organ solo is last. 



Harry Warner Coming East 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Harry M. Warner 
leaves for New York today. 



Crandall in Town 

Harry Crandall, of Washington, is 
serving as representative of the Ro- 
tating Committee at First National 
this week. 



Monte Blue Leaves 
Monte Blue is en route for Los 
Angeles to appear in "Main Street" 
for Warner Brothers. 



Berman Leaves Goldwyn 

Abe Berman, who joined Goldwyn 
several months ago and who was 
identified with Edward Bowes' office, 
has resigned. 



Goetz Goes Up-State 

Charles Goetz, manager of the W-B 
exchange has gone to Buffalo, taking 
with him Charles ("Pop") Berliner 
and Lionel Edel who will handle 
sales there. 



Reichenbach Returns 

Harry Reichenbach returned yes- 
terday from a three weeks' stay in 
Detroit where he worked a number 
of effective exploitation stunts on 
"The Dangerous Age" and "Hearts 
Aflame." The former picture played 
at Kunsky's Capitol New Year's 
Week and grossed about $25,000. 
"Hearts Aflame" is now running at 
the Adams, 



Proposed Contract 

(Continued from Page 1) 

(3) In the case of the First Exhibition 
Rights (run) being hired herein, the 
following theaters shall be barred for a 
period of days after the termi- 
nation of this agreement and these 
kinemas (theaters) shall not be allowed 
to advertise the said film in any manner 

whatsoever until days after 

the termination of this contract, except 
by slide upon their own screen. 

theater town 

.'. . theater town 

(4) Where second or subsequent Exhibition 
Rights (run) are hired herein, there 
shall be inserted in the following spaces 
the names of the theaters (kinemas) 
and the number of days that the film 
shall be played previous to the com- 
mencement of this agreement. 

days at theater 

days at theater 

(5) THE RENTER agrees to deliver the 
said film, carriage paid, in sound and 
complete condition on the first day of 
hire period mentioned herein, in time 
for the Hirer to examine and prepare 
the film for exhibition previous to the 
matinee performance. 

(6) THE RENTER hereby declares that 
lie holds the sole rights of the above- 
mentioned film for this town (district), 
and declares that the date on which the 
film shall be first released for exhibition 

in this territory shall be 

19.. and he further undertakes to in- 
demnify the Hirer from any claims or 
penalties as to the proprietorial rights 
or copyright. 

(7) THE RENTER undertakes to indem- 
nify the Hirer against all claims as to 
proprietorial rights or copyright in 
connection with any music which the 
Renter undertakes to supply with the 
said film. 

(8) THE RENTER shall not permit any 
public exhibition of the said film in 
this territory previous to the above- 
mentioned first release date. 

(9) THE HIRER agrees to pay the said 

sum of pounds (£ ) for 

the hire of the film herein stated, within 
seven days after the completion of the 
hire period. 

(10) THE HIRER agrees to insure the said 
film against fire or accidental damage 
whilst in his possession. 

(11) THE HIRER undertake^ to return, 
carriage paid (within tlfe territory 
only), the said film immediately after 
the final exhibition, in the same condi- 
tion as received, reasonable wear and 
tear excepted, to the address and in- 
structions that the Renter shall fur- 
nish. Should the Renter instruct that 
the film be sent to an address outside 
the territory, the Renter shall refund to 
the Hirer the cost of any extra carriage 
incurred thereby. 

(12) THE HIRER agrees to exhibit the 
said film at the above-mentioned theater 

(kinema) only and at no other place 
or places during the time the film is in 
his possession. 

(13) This agreement shall be signed by both 
parties and completed simultaneously, 
failing which this agreement shall be- 
come null and void. 

(14) In the event of any dispute arising out 
of this agreement, the parties shall 
submit such dispute to a Board of 
Arbitration, such Board to consist of 
two Renters, two Hirers, and an in- 
dependent referee, according and sub- 
ject to the provisions of the Arbitration 
Act, 1889. 



Al St. John Coming East 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Hollywood — Upon the completion I 
of his next comedy, Al St. John will 
leave for New York on a vacation. 
Bennie Stolloff, his assistant direc- 
tor will accompany him. 



CHAS. 0. BAUMANN, 



Prea. 



RESOURCES - $5,001, 100 
— LEGAL RATES - 



PRODUCERS & STARS 

represented. Also every form of 
financial service rendered in connec- 
tion therewith — at legal rate*. 



GREAT NORTHERN FINANCE CORP. 

Knickerbocker Building 

Broadway at 42nd Street, N. Y. City 
Telephone Bryant 2989 



International Distributers of 
MOTION PICTURES 



Inter-Ocean Film Corporation 



INTER-OCEAN BUILDING 

218 WEST 42nd ST. NEW YORK 

BRYANT 7812 

WHEN YOU THINK OF 
FOREIGN THINK OF 

INTER-OCEAN 



WILL PURCHASE 

lease on desirable improved theater 
property. All communications con- 
fidential. Write full particulars. Price, 
seating capacity and equipment. Prin- 
cipals only. Address B-04, care The 
Film Daily. 



ART TITLES 

LOUIS MEYER 

Craftsmen Film Lab. 
251 West 19th St. 
Watkins 7260-7461 



*WE NEVEP DISAPPOINT' 



OtOMLQWFlLM yUJORATOWES 



PHONE 
BRYANT 5576 



INCORPORATED 

220 WEST 42 SB STREET 
NEW yocK 



ALLAN A.LQWNE5 
GEN. MGR 



THE 



nesday, Januar y 10, 1923 

— ■ — — — *— ■ ^— 




itkeN 



ews 



No. 4 
SICE SENDS TROOPS INTO THE 
>JELAND — Scenes from Dusseldorf as 
e prepares to enforce reparation terms. 

VTE ASKS WITHDRAWAL OF U. S. 
DPS FROM GERMANY— The Presi- 
receives resolution from Senate; facts 
igures of the American occupation of 
oblenz sector. 

news from Hungary; France; Korea; 
go ; Philadelphia, etc. 
'HE ONLY ONE-REEL FEATURE 

:oday 



'alentino Tops News Contest 
a list of the best pictures of 
conducted by the Daily News, 

: are four in which Rodolph 

ntino appears. The complete 

ollows: 

anslaughter," "Blood and Sand," 
in Hood," "Over the Hill," "The 
," "The Prisoner of Zenda," "The 
Horsemen," "Monte Cristo," "Tess 
le Storm Country," "Orphans of the 
i," "Trifling Women" and "The 
g Rajah." 



"Movie Kodak" 

New Camera Said to Have Reached 

Technical Perfection — Eastman 

Experts at Work 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Rochester, N. Y. — "A movie ko- 
dak" is the descriptive title given a 
new invention which is said to have 
reached technical perfection at 
Kodak Park. 

For three years camera and lens 
experts and chemical scientists have 
been bending efforts toward the per- 
fection of a motion picture camera 
which could be used by amateurs. 
At last the experiments have borne 
fruit, and at a meeting Monday of 
the American Chemical Society Dr. 
C. E. Kenneth Mees, director of the 
research laboratory of the Kodak 
company, is lecturing on the new 
machine. 

The camera, called the motion pic- 
ture kodak, takes a film of 16mm. in 
width. The standard motion picture 
film is 35mm. The capacity of the 
new kodak is 100 ft. of the small 
film, which is equal to 250 ft. of 
standard film. The action of the 
kodak is the same as the large stand- 
ard professional cameras. 



Famous Signs Dwan 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Famous also stated yesterday that 
Herbert Brenon will direct for the 
organization, his first picture to be 
"The Rustle of Silk" in which Betty 
Compson will star. Later, Brenon 
will make "The Woman with Four 
Faces," another Compson vehicle. 

Tom J. Geraghty who has been in 
charge of production at the Long 
Island studio is returning to Holly- 
wood to assume other duties at the 
Lasky plant. Lloyd E. Sheldon, until 
now Geraghty's assistant will be in 
charge in Long Island City. 



Incorporations 

Hartford, Conn. — Palace Theater 
Corp., Norwich. Capital, $150,000. 



Albany — Miracle Theater Corp., 
Bronx. Capital, $10,000. Incor- 
porators, A. James and D. Goldstein. 



Dover. Del. — The United Radio 
Publicity Corp. Incorporators: H. 
G. Wilson, Frank C. Mooney, Charles 
Mooney. Capital $500,000. 



Moreno in "The Exciters" 

Antonio Moreno will be co-starred 
with Bebe Daniels in "The Exciters" 
which, as exclusively noted in THE 
FILM DAILY, Richard Ordynsky 
will direct for Famous. 



Albany— Blue Bird Kiddie, Man- 
hattan motiot. pictures. Capital, 
$50,00. Incorporators, H. Suchman 
and J. and I. Rosenthal. 



Albany — Fascination Pictures, 
Manhattan. Incorporators: L. R. 
Bangsberg and H. S. Douglas, New 
York. Capital $10,000; E, C. Christ- 
ensen, attorney. 



Buffalo Strand Closes 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Buffalo — The Strand here will 
close. 



Film Man For Mayor 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Welland, Ont.— S. L. Lambert, 
owner of the Lambert here, is a 
candidate for mayor. 



a tempo. 




"LOVE'S OLD SWEET SONG" 

You recognize this line— So Will Your Patrons! 

It's the title of a famous old American song and of a Lund 

Production featuring Louis Wolheim, Helen Lowell, Donald 

Gallaher and Helen Weir. 

NORCA PICTURES, Inc. 1540 Broadway, N. Y. C. 



THE SUPER 39 

WALTER HIERS 



in 



No. 12 



"Mr. Billings Spends His Dime" 

with Jacqueline Logan 

Screen play by Albert Shelby LeVino, from the story by Dana Burnet 

Directed by Wesley Ruggles 

Released March 18th 



No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



THE first star appearance of the always 
popular Walter Hiers. He is a star 
who has been made by public demand, and 
there is no doubt that he will be a big box- 
office attraction. 

No better vehicle could be selected than 
this. It's the story of a necktie salesman 

"Dark Secrets." 
"My American Wife." 
"Drums of Fate." 
"Nobody's Money." 
"Adam's Rib." 




A FAMOUS PLAYERS LASKY CORPORAnON 

. HOOLDH ZUKOQ <V,.,j..t 



who suddenly gets mixed up in a South 
American revolution, and has many excit- 
ing and screamingly funny adventures. Sup- 
porting cast includes, besides Jacqueline 
Logan, George Fawcett, Robert McKim, 
Guy Oliver and Clarence Burton. 

No. 7 "Java Head." 

No. 8 "The White Flower." 

No. 9 "Adam and Eva." 

No. 10 "Racing Hearts'* 

No. 11 "The Nth Commandment' 





(X (paramount (picture 



WATCH THIS 

SPACE 

MONDAY 

FOR 

No. 13 



THE 



j5^»S: 



DAILY 



ma^Bmmmmmmaasr- 
Wednesday, January 10, 19 



Newspaper Opinions 

"One Week of Love" — Selznick 

Capitol 

AMERICAN—* * * It is all extremely well 
Elaine Hammerstein * * * displayed 
dramatic power that was quite surprising. 

TRIBUNE — It should prove great enter- 
tainment for all those who like their society 
pictures undiluted. 

DIMES— "One Week of Love," * * * 
pursues the course of out-and-out melo- 
drama to a stagy conclusion which, is patently 
put on for the sake of its thrill without regard 
to the logic and aim of the story. 

MORNING WORLD— Elaine Hammer- 
stein * * * is distinctly Broadway calibre. 
But we are not so sure of that, either. If 
Fifth Avenue had cinema theaters, Miss Ham- 
merstein would deserve to have her name there 
in lights as big as Nazimova's. * * * Even so, 
"One Week of Love" is as good a screen 
melodrama as Broadway has seen for a year, 
and Miss Hammerstein's performance is re- 
markably bne. 

HERALD — The spectacle of an airplane 
crashing through the roof of a Mexican 
abode hut is beautifully managed in this film. 

* * * There are other big scenic punches — 
a railroad train crashing from a miniature 
bridge into a miniature river, and a hero 
rescuing a heroine on the brink of a waterfall. 

* * * In fact, "One Week of Love'' is just 
about as obvious in theme as it is possible 
for a motion picture to be. * * That it is 
more than usually entertaining is a tribute to 
the skill of its director, George Archainbaud. 

MORNING TELEGRAPH— * * * a West- 
ern romantic drama acted with restrain*, and 
with several exciting scenes and much 
suspense. 

MAIL — The sheik is with us again, Amer- 
icanized this time. * * * The climax is a 
thrilling wreck, in which an entire train 
plunges from a bridge into the river below. 

TELEGRAM — But it is, after all, the aero- 
plane scenes which leave the most indelible 
impression. An incredible amount of atten- 
tion has been devoted to minute detail. 

GLOBE — There are situations that are 
very alive and tense, and the theme as handled 
and directed is sufficient to hold the interest. 

SUN— "One Week of Love," * * * is 
obviously "The Sheik" done to the tune of 
airplane motors and Mexican greaser lingo. 
* in the end * * * home, she parts from 
him quite tenderly and yet sensibly. * * * 
One wishes the picture could end right here, 
for the story i * has proceeded quite 

plausibly, and yet entertainingly, up to this 
point, full of natural human reactions, and 
under Archainbaud's judiciously emphatic di- 
rection showing snappy signs of life that dis- 
tinguish the movie quick from the movie dead 
* such a powerful vivid and sensational 
wreck that one can forgive it readily even 
when the stereotyped waterfalls are dragged 
in. 

JOURNAL — * * * excellent film romance 
One Week of Love" gets away to a 
good start and maintains the tempo, even 
though most of its situations have lost their 
novelty for picture enthusiasts. It has two or 
\hree thrills that actually thrill. * * * 



Southwestern Notes 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Iowa Falls, la. — The Petite has re- 
opened. 



October Exports 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Washington — Statistics covering 
exports oi films during October, just 
made public by the Department of 
Commerce, show that shipments 
totaled more than 22,000,000 feet, 
with a value of approximately $750, 
000. The most important item was 
positive film, of which 12,229,916 feet, 
valued at $531,754, were exported, 
the principal markets being Australia, 
Argentina and Canada, in the order 
named. During the month also there 
was exported 492,781 feet of exposed 
negative film, valued at $37,959, the 
most important market being Eng- 
land. Exports of sensitized but un- 
exposed film during the month total- 
ed 9,215,143 feet, with a value of 
$195,837, the most important mar- 
kets being France and Japan, the 
former taking half of the total ex- 
ports. 



Cleveland — Frank Jene has been 
transferred to the F. B. O. office here 
as booker from their New Orleans 
office. 



Takes Over Poli House 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Bridgeport, Conn. — The Plaza 
Amusement Co. has been formed to 
take over the lease of Poli's Plaza 
here. 



Pine Bluff, Ark.— The Berbig has 
been reopened under ownership of 
Kassinelli, Sepel and Prinze. 



Omaha — G. H. McCool has been 
appointed salesman of the local Uni- 
versal office. Roy Sedin succeeds 
McCool as booker. 



El Dorado, Ark.— The Rex, de- 
stroyed by fire, is being replaced with 
a new structure by M. J. Pruniski of 
Little Rock, and M. S. McCord of 
El Dorado. 



Willat Selecting Exteriors 
Irvin Willat is in Florida selecting 
exteriors for "Fog Bound" in which 
Dorothy Dalton will appear for Fa- 
mous. This will follow "The Law of 
the Lawless" now in production on 
the coast. 



"Omar" Exploitation 

First National exploitating "Omar 
the Tentmaker," has devised a palan- 
quin to be used wherever the picture 
is shown. The cost will be from 
$15 to $300, depending on the ma- 
terial used in construction. 



Simpson Co. Changes Name 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Dallas — The James P. Simpson C 
Wm. T. Pickering, president, h; 
changed their name to the Picker. 
Theater Advertising Co. 



The Most Talked of Author 
in the World 



IS 



H. G. WELLS 

His Most Famous Novel 



IS 



Fabian's Buy Strand 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Newark — The Fabian's have taken 
over the Strand here from Lou Ros- 
enthal at a figure reported close to 
$100,000. The Strand has been mak- 
ing the going hard for the Fabian's 
with high rentals. 



"PASSIONATE FRIENDS 

Published by Harper and Bros. 

READ BY MILLIONS 

Everyone Will Want To See the 
Marvellous Picturization of this 
Literary Sensation 

WATCH FOR RELEASER DATE 
GEORGE H. DAVIS I 



1600 BROADWAY 



NEW YORK CIT 



t 



9 Gene Roth Ought to Know I 

He shows pictures that make money. He understands what to buy. READ: 



CLASS OF SERVICE 


iVMDOL 


Telegnir.i 




Day Letts* 


Blue 


Niyht Message 


Nite 


Night Letter 


NL 


It non« of these three symbols 
appears after the check (number of 
words) this is a telegram. Other* 
wist. Its character is Indicated by the 
symbol appearing after the check. 



WESTERNUNION 



UNION 
AM 



NEWCOMB CARLTON. PRESIDENT 



GEORGE W E. ATKINS. FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT 



CLASS OF SERVICE KiMBOL 


Telegram 




Day Letter 


Blue 


Night Message 


NIL 


Night Letter 


NL 


If none o( these hire, symbols 
appears after llie c* H,k -lumber of 
words! this Is a tetec-am. Otier« 
wise its character ia Indicated t" the 
symbol appearing after tne chuck. 



25 BG 36 VJ _ 

SAN FRANCISCO CAL. JAN 5 1923. 

AL. LICHTMAN CORP. 

1650 BROADWAY NEW YORK NY. 

HAVE MADE SPECIAL TRIP YOUR STUDIOS TO PREVIEW "THE HERO" 
"ARE YOU A FAILURE?" "POOR MEN'S WIVES" AND "THE GIRL WHO CAME 
BACK." STOP IMMEDIATELY BOOKED ALL FOUR STOP BEN SCHULBERG'S 
INDEFATIGABLE WORK AT STUDIO PRESAGES LLOYDS INSURANCE FOR 
FUTURE PRODUCTIONS. STOP CONGRATULATIONS. 

EUGENE H. ROTH, 

GRANADA, CALIFORNIA AND IMPERIAL THEATRES. 



Wednesday, January 10, 1923 



—2&< 



DAILY 



Putting It Over 



Here is how a brother ex- 
hibitor put his show over. 
Send along your ideas. Let 
the other fellow know how you 
cleaned up. 



[ovel Exploitation Stunt 

New York — Marc Lachmann, Uni- 
ersal exploiteer, is responsible for 
ne of the most novel exploitation 
tunts of the year in connection with 
le recent Broadway presentation of 
The Flirt," at the Rialto. By a tie- 
p with the Barber's Union, he had 
special day set aside in which 
olored cards advertising "The Sam 
'enton Hair-cut for Men" were in- 
erted in all barber shops. This card 
ed the hair-cut up with Tom Ken- 
edy, a member of "The Flirt's" 
ast. 



'aking a Chance 
Indianapolis — The Circle took a big 
hance in playing First National's 
Oliver Twist" and won out. Two 
yeeks before the picture opened it 
dvertised the fact that if it should 
ain between seven and nine on the 
ipening night patrons would be con- 
eyed to the theater by the cars of 
wo taxicab companies with whom a 
ie up was made, without charge, 
"or two weeks every cab operated by 
hese two companies carried this sign 
in "Oliver Twist" and the Circle 
["heater. It was tremendous adver- 
ising for the picture that was doubly 
,s effective as an ordinary tie up. It 
upplemented a comprehensive cam- 
iaign that embodied the use of the 
Oliver Twist" coach, the walking 
iook and the teachers and libraries 
,nd window displays in about a dozen 
tores. 



darnel for Omar 

Davenport, la. — When Manager 
^overidge of the Capitol started his 
:xploitation campaign on "Omar the 
rentmaker" he began looking for a 
:amel. The manufacturer of Omar 
:igarettes might have caused trouble 
because of such a tie up with a 
"amel; but his troubles were as no- 
ting compared to the troubles of the 
exploitation agent. He spent weary 
hours looking for the rare beast but 
got it. The veiled figure on the <( two 
backed animal was labelled as "One 
of the Shah's prospective bridts" and 
urged people to see "Omar the Tent- 
maker" and find out what happened 
to her. 

The usherettes at the Capitol were 
dressed in the garb of habitues of a 
Persian harem. Enhancing this at- 
mosphere, one of these girls was sta- 
tioned at a table in the lobby every 
evening to give out figs and dates. 

The traffic "scare" novelty was 
used, large envelopes being distri- 
buted to motorists with the sign: 
"New Traffic Rules" and the ques- 
tion: "Do You Think This City 
Should License Drivers?" The folder 
inside warned drivers to use unusual 
caution in propelling their gas wagons 
during the "Omar" run because of the 
crowds that would be on the streets 
and especially around the theater. 

The quatraine contest was used in 
conjunction with the Daily Times. 



SI at 64.1 Cents 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
New Haven — The purchas- 
ing value of the dollar today 
is 64.1 cents of its pre-war 
value, according to a compila- 
tion made by Irving Fisher, 
professor of political economy 
at Yale. 



New First Nat'l Office 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Omaha — The new exchange of 
First Nat'l has been opened at 1511 
Chicago St. The exchange was form- 
erly housed on Farnum St., but, as 
noted, was destroyed by fire several 
months ago. 



$500,000 String For St. Paul 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
St. Paul — it is reported that a 
group of eastern capitalists will erect 
six houses in residential districts of 
this city to cost $500„000. Oscar 
Tatkin is representing the financiers, 
having secured permits for two of 
the houses. 



Capital Increases 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
St. Louis — Southern Real Estate 
and Financial Co. raised its capital 
from $1,000,000 to '$1,450,000; Colum- 
bia Theater raised its stock from 
$200,000 to $300,000; Middleton The- 
ater Co. raised its stock from $100,- 
000 to $450,000; Castle Amusement 
Co. raised its stocK: from $25 000 to 
$100,000; and the Mid City Realty 
Co. raised its stock from $100,000 to 
$200,000. 



Receiver Asked For 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Newark — A bill for receivership 
against the North Jersey Theaters 
Corp., owner of the Lyndhurst at 
Lyndhurst, nas been filed by Libman 
& Spanjer of Newark. The latter 
corporation has a claim of $1,300 
against the Lyndhurst corporation. 
John T. Collins admitted that the 
theater has been a loss from the 
start. Assets are said to be about 
$90,000 and liabilities, including the 
mortgage on the property, about 
$85,000. 



Robin Hood Big London Success 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
London — A special correspondent 
of the New York Herald says. 

"It packed the Pavilion the first 
performance, and that astute shrinker 
from publicity, C. B. Cochrane, has 
been apologizing in quarter pages 
ever since that the house isn't big 
enough. England, even that England 
which Ambassador Page said was so 
beautiful on account of the layers of 
thick green moss of tradition, has 
taken this Yank hero and his Cali- 
fornia pasteboard settings to its heart. 
Leaping literally, as he does through 
one of the most English of all 
English traditions Doug must have 
had qualms when he sent the film 
here. He may be satisfied. Even 
the Morning Post approves." 



KEYSTONE COMEDY REVIVAL 

France is worried ! 
England is worried ! 
The United States is worried ! 
Everybody is worried ! 

ALL THEY NEED IS A 

Good Hearty Laugh! 

Of course, everybody remembers Key- 
stone Comedies. No Program was com- 
plete without them, and, since then, real 
laughs have been few and far between. 
Audiences pay to be amused; that's why 
Keystone is the best known Trade Mark 
in pictures throughout the world. Re- 
cently, for whole days, we looked at Key- 
stone comedies with some of the greatest 
laugh experts in the world and decided 
they would cure both world and Box 
Office troubles. 

So, we're going to release, during the 
next six months, twelve of them, re-edited 
and re-titled by a well known comedy 
Producer and assisted by one of the 
screen's cleverest titlewriters, they will 
be protected as such by copyright. 

All theatres are warned against the use 
of dupes or unauthorized prints of these 
subjects, as all violations will be vigor- 
ously prosecuted. 

State-right exchanges are wanted in 
each state to cooperate with us in an in- 
tensive campaign of exploitation which 
will put these high class comedies on 
every screen in America. They must be 
of good business standing and financial 
responsibility. 

TRI-STONE PICTURES, Inc. 

565 FIFTH AVENUE 



TRIANGLE 
PICTURES 



H. E. Aitken 
Oscar A. Price 



KEYSTONE 
COMEDIES 



THE 



&&»i 



DAILY 



Wednesday, January 10, 19.;. 



The Troubles of an 
Exhibitor 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Just then, from somewhere, came 
a raspberry. It was a loud one too. 
Bevans refused to continue. Then the 
repartee started. Ike Wholsum of 
Leprosy said that Lena Ghenster pull- 
ed the raspberry and Lena made a 
witty comeback by saying. "Wholsum 
youre a darned liar." Well that got 
a big laugh and Lena was forced to 
make a speech. Lena gets up and 
says: "Fellow exhibitors, I been want- 
ing to speak ever since this convention 
started and now that I am called on. 
I want to say that I have had a good 
time (applause). I want to thank- 
Mr. Deneker for his personal 
trouble." She sets down and boy 
you should a heard the applause I 
gits. 

All over the room is shouts, the 
hole ten of them was shouting. I 
tl ink I heard a raspberry or two. 
but didn't pay no attention to them. 
So I gets up and delivers the speech 
of the day. I says: "Ladies and 
Gentlemen (Mrs. Deneker is there 
with me) I am glad you all have had 
a good time and if there is anything 
you all have learned from my method 
of exhibiting, why welcome to it. 

"I admit I am a good exhibitor and 
it you bohunks get any ideas, I'm 
glad." Well, that's where the repartee 
rnded. I never heard such a rasp- 
berry in my life. Of course I could 
a pinned it on Bevans, my nearest 
competitor, but I aint saying. But 
this much I know, anyone that tries 
to get a bunch of hick exhibitors to- 
gether for their own protection, is a 
first class sap. I'm through with 'em. 

I got a big lot of high class features 
coming in the next two weeks. I 
got that serial I got hooked with. 
Boy, it sure is a bed ridden feature. 
Every time I walk in on it, some 
one is either getting in, or out of their 
bed, I think its some kind of a tie-up 
with the Owen Daveno Company. 

That'll be all for this time except 
that I am going to Los Angeles next 
week. My wife won a free trip from 
the Rocky Mountain Gazette and I 
am going to use it. Boy — that Holly- 
wood better look out. I'm thinking 
for picking my films from the studio 
direct and not bothering with no 
salesmen or exchanges. 

Merry Christmas, 
Yours, 
CLEM DENEKER. 



The Celluloid Salesman 

"Jimmy" Grainger writes: 

"Regarding your pertinent comment with 
reference to salesmen seeing and being con- 
versant with the product they are selling : 

"It may interest you to know that there 
are now in our exchanges short sales reels 
approximately 1,000 feet in length titled 'The 
relluloid Salesman.' These show the high 
spots and outstanding scenes of the picture, 
contain suggestions of exploitation value to 
the exhibitor, and also give him some idea 
of the advertising accessories and novelties in 
conjunction with each picture to enable him 
to put it over to a box office success. 

"Our sales staff has found that in the ma- 
jority of cases exhibitors dislike using up 
lime to screen pictures and we generally 
find that al such screenings a few scenes will 
suffice to sell the exhibitor, therefore, these 
reels are carried by our salesmen and are 
- used to give the exhibitor an idea of 
the picture he is buying. 

"These 'Celluloid Salesmen' will be issued 
with each of our bigger productions starting 
with 'The Strangers' Banquet.' " 



Coast Brevities 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Hollywood — Rowland V. Lee has 
added Lucille Hutton to the cast of 
"Desire." 



Wally Van completes the cast of 
Selznick's "The Common Law." 



Larry Semon's next comedy will 
be called "No Wedding Bells." 



Rowland V. Lee has retained 
George Barnes to photograph "De- 
sire." 



Metro's next comedy for Bull Mon- 
tana will be "Two Twins." Albert 
Austin will direct. 



The Standard Film Laboratories of 
Hollywood have opened a number of 
new negative cutting rooms. 

Frank Ormstrom will be art direc- 
tor for Norma Talmadge in "Within 
the Law" and Constance in "Madame 
Pompadour." 



Allen Holubar has added the fol- 
lowing to the cast of "The White 
Frontier": Robert Anderson, William 
A. Orlamond and Herbert Portier. 



Fred W. Jackman, president of the 
American Society of Cinematograph- 
ers is at Gardnier, Mont., directing the 
shooting of snow and primitive 
scenes. 



Universal has acquired "Souls That 
Pass in the Night," by W. J. Flynn, 
formerly Chief of the U. S. Secret 
Service. The story deals with fake 

spiritualists. 



Universal has secured the screen 
rights to "The Self-Made Wife," a 
Saturday Evening Post story by 
Elizabeth Alexander and plans to pro- 
duce it with an all-star cast. 



Winifred Bryson has been added 
to the cast of "The Hunchback of 
Notre Dame." Jack Sullivan, James 
Dugan and William Wyles will be 
assistant directors. 



Jack Conway will direct William 
Hurlburt's "Trimmed in Scarlet" cast 
of which will include Kathlyn Wil- 
liams. David Torrance, Roy Stewart, 
Fhillips Smallev, Robert Agnew and 
Lucille Ricksen. "White Tiger," 
starring Priscilla Dean, is finished. 



Lee McCary will be assistant direc- 
tor to George Archainbaud in pro- 
duction of "The Common Law," in 
the cast of which will be Corinne 
Griffith, Elliott Dexter, Phyllis Haver 
and Conway Tearle. Selznick has re- 
tnined Shirley Vance Martin as still 
photographer. 



Margaret Leahy, English prize 
beauty brought to this country by the 
Talmadges, will be leading woman to 
Buster Keaton in his first five-reel 
comedy, production on which will 
begin within a week and which will 
be directed by Eddie Cline. Miss 
Leahy was originally slated for the 
role of Aggie Lynch in "Within the 
Law." 

H. E. GAUSMAN. 



ADOLPH ZUKOR 

MARCUS LOEW 

RICHARD ROWLAND 

F. J. GODSOL 

CARL LAEM VILE 

HIRAM ABRAMS 

WILLIAM FOX 

ELMER PEARSON 

W. W. I tODKINSON 

P. A. POWERS 

L. J. SELZNICK 

ALBERT E. SMITH 

J. D. WILLIAMS 

ARTHUR S. KANE 

FRED WARREN 

We Know You Want 

SUCCESS 

Every Exhibitor Will 
DEMAND IT! 

See Tomorrow's 

FILM DAILY 



tie BRADSTREET 
of FILMDOM 




$<?re(ocnizei 
Authority 



ol. XXIII No. 10 



Thursday. January 11, 1923 



ontract Completed 



CI 

irst National Secures Chaplin's 
Latest "The Pilgrim"— Last of 

Series 
First National officially announced 
sterday that they had secured world 
jhts to Chaplin's latest, "The Pil- 
ini." 



This is the last of the Chaplin's to 
me through First National. There 
.ve been a number of interesting 
velopments with regard to this pro- 
iction and it is said that because 

various developments and compli- 
tions at one time papers were pre- 
red to be served on Hiram Abrams 

United Artists through which or- 
nization Chaplin is obligated by 
ntract to release a number of pic- 
res. 

Chaplin has in readiness a two 
eler which is said to be called "The 
ea" which on one occasion was 
r ered to First National in prefer- 
ce to "The Pilgrim." But the 
mpletion of the arrangements with 
?ard to "The Pilgrim" nullifies the 
ssibility of First National handling 
t two reeler. 

"The Pilgrim" is over four reels in 
igth. It is understood that a large 
m was paid in cash for distribution 
;hts to "The Pilgrim" and that 
laplin will have a sharing arrange- 
;nt in the gross beyond a certain 
int. Release date has been set for 
b. 26. 



Ryan With Theater Owners 
Distributing Corp. 

Arthur Ryan, for several years 
th the Griffith organization where 
managed road shows on various 
the Griffith attractions, is now as- 
:iated witli the Theater Owners 
St. Corp., which has taken over 
: offices until now occupied by the 
thur S. Kane Pictures Corp. " The 
ter company is moving over to the 
sociated Exhibitors offices on 45th 



After Googan 

ast Reports Pickford and Fair- 
banks Want Jackie's Pictures 

for Distribution 
rhe Associated Press yesterday re- 
tted the following from Los An- 
es: 

'Douglas Fairbanks and Mary 

:kford, his wife, as the first step of 

Ian to enter upon independent pro- 

Etion and distribution of cinema 

tures made by other leading actors 

the screen, have offered Jackie 

ogan, child film actor, a contract 

four pictures, and have announced 

ns for an expansion of the United 

(Continued on Page 2) 







Price 5 Cents 



"The most thrilling phases of the old French criminal life are graphically 
depicted in "Secrets of Paris," an absorbing version of Eugene Sue's 
masterpiece, at the Cameo theatre. Those who crave excitement will find 
it," — Grena Bennett in the N. Y. American, Jan. 8th. — Advt. 



No Release Set 

First Nat'l Not to Handle "Ten Ton 
Love" — Disagree Over Exhibi- 
tion Value 

It is understood that First National 
will not distribute "Ten Ton Lo\ e," 
an Ince production directed by John 
Griffith Wray. It is further under- 
stood that there has been a disagree- 
ment over the exhibition, value set on 
lh< production. 

Originally, according to report, an 
exhibition valuation of $700,000 was 
placed on it but when the executive 
committee met, the valuation was re- 
duced. Ince refused to accept 
figure and for that reason the deal 
fell through. \n effort was made to 
obtain a statement from Colvin 
Brown, luce's New York manager, 
hut he could not be reached at his 
iffices ■ esterday. 



Wants Coue in Film 
Al Lichtman yesterday wrote a 

letter to Emile Coue. the Nancy 
pharmacist, who has caused consider- 
able discussion by his principle of 
effecting cures through conscious 
autosuggestion, in which he offered 
Coue $5,000 a week to appear in a 
film which would deal with Co 
methods. 



Promises Two Units 

One Will Make Fitzmaurice Prod. 

and One Glass Comedy for Sam 

Goldwyn 

(Special to THE FILM DxMLY) 

Los Angeles — Samuel Goldwyn 
promises to have at least two pro- 
duction units. One will he headed 
by George Fitzmaurice, and the 
ond by an as yet unnamed director, 

first picture will he Mont; 
Glass' "P and Perlmutter." 

ildwyn states that production will 
he centered here and that he nia\ 
later sign several stars. He is silent 
on the subject of distribution. 



G orge Fitzmaurice is now editing 
and titling "Bella Dei for 

Famous Players. He is still under 
contract to that organization and has 
to make "The Cheat." Ouida 
i re. his wife, will continue to 
write stories and scripts for him 
under the contract with Goldwyn. 



"Roxy," Green Room Club's Guest 

The Green Room Club will hold its 

■ iid revel on Sunday night at 

-amitel L. Ro 

honor. Harry Reichenbach 

will be the toastmaster. 



f $50,000 For Film 

I "Producer Releasing Through Fa- 
mous Players" Made Valentino 
Offer— Seeks Relief 

Chief Justice John I'roctor Clarke 
of the Appi 5 jon of the 

Supreme Court ' 
whereby Farm 
to show 

straining Rodolph Valentino 
not I I and altered so that 

permitted to earn a 
living "ii e occupation not in 

competition with the plaintiff — re- 
spondent's business." 

Arthur Butler Graham, Valentino's 
attorney, will a! to secure a 

surety bond of $2 to indemnify 

Valentino against loss in the event 
that he should 1 1< at the 

trial. 

In connection with this action, 
Valentino has sworn in an affidavit 
that a producer who is now making 
film- for Fam - offered him 

$50,000 to appear in a film, designed 
to be completed in 10 weeks with a 
proviso that Valentino was to receive 
$5,000 a week if the production should 
run over the stipulated period. The 
affidavit alleges that a representative 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Navarro To Be Starred 
Ramon Navarro, whose work in 
"Trifling Women," as well as "The 
Prisoner of Zenda," attracted unusual 
attention, signed a long term con- 
tract with Metro yesterday. He will 
appear in the two forthcoming Rex 
Ingraham specials, one of which will 
he "Scaramouche" and later will be 
starred. 



"Success" Garsson's First Ready 

"Success," the first special made by 
Murray W. Garsson, Inc.. featuring 
Brandon Tynan has been completed. 

This is Tynan's first appearance in 
pictures. Hi -trong following 

on the legitimate stag 

The production was directed by 
Ralph Ince. 

"Counterfeit Love" the second 
Garsson production is now in work. 



Short Stuff 

Special issue The Film Daily 
devoted exclusively to the value 
of short stuff in the building 
of programs. 

SUNDAY, FEB. 18 

Of unusual value to every ex- 
hibitor regardless of the size 
of his house. Watch for future 
announcements. 



THE 



sat 




_ 




Vol XXIII wo. 10 Thursday, Jan. 11,1923 Price 5 Cents 

Copyright 1923, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 
J. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
age 1 "; J- A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 
Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central European Representative — -Interna- 
tionale Filmschau. Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
vakia), Wenzelsplatz. 



Quotations 

High Low Cloce Sak-t 

East. Kod. 97 96 96 2,200 

F. P.-L. .. 89-K 88^ 8874 3,000 

do pfd Not quoted 

Goldwyn . 6K 6 6K 500 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's .. 18H 195^ 19J4 U00 

Triangle N ot quoted 

World Not quoted 



Western Import Co., formerly at 
71 W. 23rd St., is now located at 145 
W. 45th St. 



/T (Sk^tcccutioriac U'Cctu/u^ 




TITLES 



NEGATIVE 
POSITIVE 
Incl. CARDS 

15 CENTS PER FOOT 

24 Hour Service if necessary 

SIMPLEX TITLE SHOP 

220 W. 42d Street Bryant 0985 



WANTED for ENGLAND 
Features — 2 reel comedies. 
Two reel dramas. Also big 
features for Czecho-Slavakia. 
Send press books and full par- 
ticulars 
C-12 c/o Film Daily. 



Now at 203-5 W. 40th St. 

In our OWN LABORATORY 

and STUDIO 

ERNEST STERN 

The Titleman 
Phones Penn. 2373-2374 



After Googan 

(( uiKmurd from Page 1) 

Artists' organization, the Los Angeles 
Times states today. 

"The expansion plans contemplate 
the production under the supervision 
of Mr. Fairbanks and Miss Pickford 
of feature films by eight or nine of 
the most popular screen artists. 

"Mr. Fairbanks said that Jackie 
Coogan would be offered a contract 
with the United Artists calling for a 
cash advance of $500,000, and a guar- 
antee of 60% of the profits of the 
first four pictures he would make at 
the Fairbanks-Pickford studio." 



Irving Lesser is in California and 
when Max Roth was reached at 
Lesser's office yesterday, he said it 
was all news to him. 



Madge Kennedy Sails 
Madge Kennedy sailed for a short 
trip to Japan yesterday. Upon her 
return she will start work on her 
second Kcnma picture. 



Says Stock Issue Was False 
At the hearing in bankruptcy 
against Max Spiegel, Walter Hays, 
vice-president of the Mitchell H. 
Mark Realty Corp., operators of the 
various Mark Strand theaters, 
charged that Spiegel had issued a 
false issue of voting trust certificates 
on common stock with a face value 
of $490,000 on which. Hays alleges, 
Spiegel secured bank loans to the 
extent of $327,000. 



$50,000 For Film 

(Continued from I'atr 1( 

of the producer interviewed Adolph 
Ztikor and pointed out that distribu- 
tion world be handled by Famous 
Players inasmuch as the producer in 
question was oblisred under contract 
to release all of his productions 
through Famous. The affidavit goes 
on to say that Zukor refused to act. 
Valentino states that he has had an 
offer to dance at $6,000 a week and 
another to make phonograph records 
at $5,000 a record plus a royalty. 

Famous Players has been ordered 
to show cause at the Appellate Divi- 
sion Courthouse, 25th St. and Madi- 
son Ave. on Friday morning. Gra- 
ham advances as a reason for a re- 
argument that Valentino was induced 
to sign the contract with Famous 
under representations that it was the 
same as the Meighan contract. 



The only producer who is making 
outside productions for Famous Play- 
ers release is the Cosmopolitan Corp. 
(Hearst). At the studio yesterday, 
no one could be reached to comment 
on the statement made by Valentino 
in his affidavit. 



FOR SALE 

FAMOUS 1531 
MELO - DRAMA 

CALL - PHONE - WIRE 



BROADWAY 
SUITE 400 

BRYANT 
1530 



"JUST A MOTHER" 

A Title That Means Something — at the Box-Office 
and a story that me:ns something, for it is an adap- 
tation of "Mrs. Thompson," by the famous novelist, 
W. B. MAXWELL. 

"JUST A MOTHER" 

With Isobel Elsom 

NORCA PICTURES, Inc. 1540 Broadway, N.Y. C. 



STUDIO-LABORATORY 

FOR SALE 

EXCELLENT PROPOSITION 

Concrete and Glass Building, 80x100, Three Floors; Studio, 

Laboratory, Executive Offices, Directors' Rooms, Dark 

Rooms, etc. Traveling Crane for Lights. 

Grounds, 100x200. Street Frontage. 

No Encumbrances. 45 Minutes from Broadway. 

Reasonable Price and Terms. 

EDWARD L. KLEIN COMPANY 

EXPORT— FILMS— IMPORT 
152 West 42nd St. Telephones 

NEW YORK CITY Bryant 6353-1587 



Thursday, January 11, 1923 



"Knighthood"' Held Over 

"When Knighthood Was in Flow- 
er" will be held over at the Rivoli 
for a second week. 

"Drums of Fate" comes to the 
Rialto next week. 



CHAS. 0. BAUMANN, 



Pre*. 



RESOURCES - $5, OOC ">00 
- LEGAL RATES - 



PRODUCERS & STARS 

represented. Also every form of 
financial service rendered in connec- 
tion therewith — at legal rat*s. 



GREAT NORTHERN FINANCE CORP. 

Knickerbocker Building 

Broadway at 42nd Street, N. Y. City 
Telephone Bryant 2989 



BIJOU 
ATLANTIC CITY 

''ONLY A 

SHOPGIRL 



NEGATIVE TITLES 

10 cents per foot, including cards. 
Through our revolutionizing process 
we give you, choice of 10 high class 
hand lettered alphabets. The highest 
class illustrations. 24 hour service. 

TITLEGRAPH STUDIOS 

203 West 49th St. Circle 10,056 

Laboratory Wad. 3443 



YOU DON'T HAVE TO 
TELL THE WORLD 

We appreciate how a great 
many business men feel about 
discussing their financial affairs. 
You will find our service con- 
fidential, sympathetic, speedy 
and effective. Bring your 
problem to us. We specialize 
in financing film propositions. 

CHROMOS TRADING CO. 

1123 Broadway 

Suite 616 'Phone Chelsea 8284 







A PICTURE THAT 
WILL LIVE FOREVER 




J 





A MOTIOP 
ACHIE\ 

DIRECTED BY~ 

RALPH 
INCE 



Distributors are intite{ 

MURRAY Wi 

522- 5* Ave. New York Oil 



THE TOAST 




PICTURE 

:ment 

With a Cast of 
Notable Artists 

Based on the 
Famous Broadway 
Stage Play 

communicate vJith 

ARSSON INC. 

one Vanderbilt 8056 




THE M/\N WHO LOST 





A picture that lends itself to greal 
exploitation without exaggeration. 








THE 



Thursday, January 11, 1923 



Among The "Independents" 




New Arrow Product 

Two Series of Short Reels and a 

Serial Lined Up— Two New 

Special Representatives 

Arrow has contracted for a batch 
of new product. One series is com- 
posed of 12 two-reel novelty reels, 
known as the Tom and Jerry series, 
in which the characters are modeled 
from clay. 

A second group is composed of 26 
comedies, half of them of the Mirth- 
quake brand, featuring Bobby Dunn 
and the other half. Broadway com- 
edies. Eddie Lyons will make a ser- 
ies. Francis Ford will make a serial 
to be called "Adventures of the South 
Seas," starring Peggy O'Day. Two 
new special representatives are 
George Hamp and R. I. Robinson. 

Arrow will release eight features 
as the "Arrowplays De Luxe"? The 
group will be composed of "Night 
Life in Hollywood," "The Streets of 
New York," "Man and Wife," "Who 
Shall Judge," "Ten Nights in a Bar- 
room," "Jacqueline," "The Broken 
Violin" and "The Little Red School- 
house." 



Hurd Completes New Comedy 
Earl Hurd, has finished a new car- 
toon comedy for C. C. Burr, president 
of Mastodon Films, Inc. This is 
called "Chicken Dressing." 



Hirsh Buys Four 

Nathan Hirsh has arranged to dis- 
tribute four new features, one a 
month. The first will be "The 
Purple Dawn" in which Bessie Love 
is featured. 



"Melo Comedies" 

Johnny Hines' comedies will hence- 
forth be known as "Melo Comedies." 
This is a word coined by Harriette 
Underhill of the Tribune in her re- 
view of "Sure Fire Flint." 



New Australian Producing Co. 

Austral Super Films, Ltd., has been 
formed in Australia to produce pic- 
tures, and will purchase outright the 
Austral Super Films Syndicate, who 
have completed "Circumstance" and 
"A Daughter of Australia." 



Superior Film Statement 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Philadelphia— E. A. Jeffries, Presi- 
dent of the Superior Film Exchange, 
questioned regarding the statements 
in the anonymous letter relating to 
that exchange, declared that it was 
not true that Superior is out of busi- 
ness and said that aside from the 
officers there are no more than seven 
or eight exhibitors interested in this 
exchange with a total investment of 
about $1,000. Originally, this ex- 
change was formed as a co-operative 
distributing company with about 30 
exhibitors as stockholders, a total of 
$7,000 in stock was sold. The com- 
pany was then a strictly co-operative 
one, no one having received anv com- 
missions or salary for the sale of 
stock. Later the officers of the cor- 
poration purchased the holdings of 
all but about six of seven of the men 
Superior declared a 10% dividend in 
May, 1921. 



Suit Over Feature 

Housman Comedies File Attachment 

Against Chaplin Classics Over 

"Snitching Hour" 

An attachment for $18,803 against 
the property of the Chaplin Classics, 
Inc., has been filed in the Supreme 
Court by the Housman Comedies, 
Inc. The complaint alleges that on 
May 29 last, the plaintiff made an 
agreement to lease to the Clark- 
Cornelius Corp., a five-reeler "The 
Snitching Hour," for $20,000, which 
was to be payable five months after 
the film was released. It is alleged 
that the film was released July 1st, 
but that only $1,196 has been paid. 
It is also stated that the Chaplin 
Classics, Inc., has taken .over the 
business of the Clark-Cornelius Corp. 

The attachment was served on E. 
F. Murphy, of 416 216th St., Edgar 
Lockwood, assistant treasurer of the 
Guaranty Trust Co.. where it is al- 
leged the defendant has funds on de- 
posit, and on S. J. Rollo, vice presi- 
dent of the defendant at 217 W. 46th 
St. 



Hank Hearns Manager 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Atlanta — Hank Hearns has been 
promoted from salesman to branch 
manager of the Southern States 
office. 



"Broken Violin" Near Completion 

Atlantic Features, Inc., have almost 
finished work on "The Broken 
Violin," which Jack Dillon is direct- 
ing for Arrow release. This is the 
first of a series. 



Open New Offices 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
St. Louis— The Nat'l Film Pub- 
licity Studios have moved into their 
new offices at Duncan Ave. and Sarah 
St. 



Werner Gets "Notoriety" 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

St. Louis — Sam Werner, United 

Film Service has acquired the South 

Illinois and Eastern Missouri rights 

to "Notoriety." 



Opera Scenes With Film 
Basil Horsfall, has entered into an 
arrangement with American Releas- 
ing whereby he will present "The 
Bohemian Girl" in Canada in con- 
junction with a presentation of the 
opera. 



First Ready 
The Nat'l Non-Theatrical announce 
the "Cradles of the Washingtons" is 
ready for release. It is the first of a 
series called, "Lives of Our Presi- 
dents" and was made in England un- 
der the auspices of the Sulgrave In- 
stitution. 



Health Films 
Gilbert Tucker, Jr., who has com- 
pleted 26 health films for the New 
York State Health Department, says 
that these pictures have proven very 
valuable, and that his department 
contemplates more extensive pro- 
duction of similar pictures. 



KEYSTONE COMEDY REVIVAE 

Since our announcement yesterday, 
of our initial series of twelve Keystone 
Comedies, we have been very much 
gratified by the approval with which 
our plan is acclaimed by the motion 
picture world. Without a dissenting 
voice, every film man we have seen 
since, has agreed: 

That Keystone is the best known 
comedy trade mark in the 
world; 

That Keystone Comedies are the 
best ever made; 

That the public will receive them 
with open arms; 

That everybody who buys them 
is going to make big money! 



TRI-STONE PICTURES, Inc. 

STRAUS BUILDING 
565 FIFTH AVENUE 



TRIANGLE 
PICTURES 



H. E. Aitken 
Oscar A. Price 



KEYSTONE 
COMEDIES 



THE 




Thursday, January 11, 1923 



Newspaper Opinions 

"Hunting Big Game in Africa" 
Lyric 

TRIBUNE- There is more drama in a 
single reel of the African big game hunting 
picture * * * than in a bale of Hollywood 
productions! 

DAILY NEWS— Mb( 
a picture which thrilled, delighted and 
entertained us as 'much as anything has in 
ye rs. We're afraid our typewriter is going 
to stutter when we try to tell you about it. 

It is called 'Hunting Big Game in 

Africa," and it is absolutely fascinating. 

* * * 

AMERICAN— A vivid record of the 

thrills and chills oi the jungle, the H. A. 

Snow production, "Hunting Big Game in 

shown at the Lyric Theater, is 

well worth seeing. 

EVENING WORLD — Comparison with 
the pictures taken by the Paul Raini 
pedition a decade ago is inevitable, and 
whir the Snow pictures show nothing quite 
as tense and thrilling as the famous water 

scene of the Rainey pictures, tin 
better balanced and provide fully as good 
entertainment. 

HERALD— For H. A. Snow, who went 
into the heart of darkness with his gun and 
his camera, has made a film that is worth 
while from a dramatic as well as an edu- 
cational point of view. 

MAIL — Superlatives are dangerous, yet 
this picture seems to surpass all of its pre- 
decessors, excellent as some of them have 
been. It is a marvelous panorama of wild 
life 1 , .marked by unusual clearness of photog- 
raphy, interesting subjects and exciting 
moments. 

SUN — "Hunting Big Game in Africa" 
impressed this reviewer as the most 
fascinating animal picture he has ever seen. 
It even exceeds in entertainment power Paul 
J. kainey's classic series of closeups of wild 
animals at the good old water hole. It is 
exciting and hu In spots it is very 

beautiful. 

GLOBE — * * * an example of the cinema 
at its best, A more uniformly inter' 

sensationally thrilling set of pictures has 
not been shown on Broadway in many a 
day. 



"The Third Alarm"- 
Astor 



-F. B. O. 



i RIBUNE — The ending is the happiest 
ending that ever you saw, no matter how 
many pictures you have seen. * * * 

There are some thrilling fire scenes in 
the picture for which we were glad. 

EVENING WORLD— There is a fire— 
well; The Third . Marin" and you'll 

laugh and weep. It is truly a thiiller, 
replete with- heart throbs and excitement. 

JOURNAL— This photodrama * * * is 
plain, unadulterated melodrama, but it is 
a brilliant example of how surpassingly fine 
screen melodrama can be made. 

TIMES— "The Third Alarm" * * * wastes 
me with non-essentials. Like the Fire 
rtment With which it deals, its object 
is to get there without stopping to explain 
liy. Its object being to supply the 
■ "Is of "pathos," "comedy," 
"virtue" and "thrills" preferred by many 
movie fans, it proceeds at once to supply 
commodities in large and labeled quan- 
without regard for continuity, logic 
or the questions of the cantankerously in- 
telligent. 

POST — There is good stuff in the film, 

ilthi ntic material for the human interest 

appeal, the skeleton of an interesting plot, 

some hair-raising fire-scenes, and 

good acting. * It suffers from 

an excess of plot and sub-plot, which makes 

intinuity ragged; it is aTso open to fair 

criticism for the use of too many stock 

devices. * * * 



"Secrets of Paris"— C. C. Burr 
Cameo 

DAILY NEWS— Paris doubtless has many 
more secrets than were disclosed at the 
- o Theatre Sunday night, but the ones 
that the picture does put on view for us 
m mainly unpleasant. * We should 

say here that Willie Collier is the best of 
the many males in the cast. 

MORK IXG WORLD— A picture as color- 
ful and as pulsating in its dancing and its 
tig and its drinking at this should, ac- 
:ording to records of past similar photo- 
stand them up in the tiny Cameo all 
this week and next week too, if it remains 
there so long. 



Reproductive quality enables the sensitive 
emulsion to correctly portray everv step of 
gradation from highest light to deepest 
shadow. 

EASTMAN 
POSITIVE FILM 

faithfully reproduces every tone of the 
negative. It carries the quality through 
to the screen. 

Eastman Film, both regular and tinted base — 
now available in nine colors, is identified through- 
out its length by the words "Eastman" "Kodak" 
stenciled in black letters in the transparent margin. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



AT LAST! 




A State Right method of production and distribution has been brought to a real com- 
mercial basis. 

Our franchise for ten super feature attractions (the first six of which have been com- 
pleted) are now being awarded to those exchanges who show progressive business 
policy and who do not gamble. The first six releases are entitled 

"FLAMES OF PASSION" 

"THE WAY OF THE TRANSGRESSOR" 

"THE POWER DIVINE" 

"A CHILD OF THE GODS" 

"THE MINE LOOTERS" 

"HIS LAST ASSIGNMENT" 

No state right man or theatre owner will ever apologize for marketing this product 
and they will be bound to make up the loss that they surfer on other pictures 
These productions are not being sold at 200% profit because we expect to continue to 
do business with the buyers. 

The state right business man will lose no time in addressing 

INDEPENDENT PICTURES CORPORATION 
1540 Broadway, Loew State Bldg., New York City 

Phone Bryant 3993 



fHE 

7Ae brAdstreet 

of FILMDOM 





^recognizee 
Authority 




Vcl. XXIII No. 11 



Friday, January 12, 1923 



Price 5 Cents 



Metro Bids, Too 

Making Overtures to Jackie Coogan 

— Lessers Making No Effort to 

Keep Him 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Metro is in the field 
for the services of Jackie Coogan. 
Officials at the studio state that 
nothing definite has been done, while 
at the Fairbanks studio the same 
statement is made. 

It is understood that Fairbanks is 
personally interested in the Coogan 
deal on behalf of Allied Artists. Ap- 
parently, Sol Lesser is not making a 
determined effort to keep Jackie. 
The indications are that when "Toby 
Tyler" is completed. Lesser and the 
Coogan interests will part amicably. 
(Continued on Page 2) 



S-L Plans "McGrew" 

S-L Prod, will produce "Dangerous 
Dan McGrew." This will follow 
"Your Friend and Mine," which 
Clarence Badger directed. In "Mc- 
Grew," Lon Chaney, Barbara La 
Marr and Williard Mack will have 
the leading roles. S-L will also pro- 
duce "Red Bulldogs," by Willard 
Mack. Metro is expected to handle 
distribution. 



Clem Deneker 

The famous exhibitor who 
has "sewed up" Pneumonia, 
Nev., and whose experiences 
have proven a delight to the 
readers of THE FILM 
DAILY, is coming to New 
York. 

At the AMPA luncheon yes- 
terday Harry Reichenbach, 
who has been on a trip West 
for the Mayer productions, 
when asked to talk of his ex- 
periences, said he had met 
Deneker; that Clem told him 
he was coming East to secure 
about 30 prints because his 
shows never arrived as per 
schedule, and to get some ideas 
on exploitation. He told Reich- 
enbach that he had booked a 
picture called "Passion of the 
Third Floor Back," and when 
it arrived discovered it was 
only an episode of "Who Is 
Number One?" the famous old 
Famous serial. 

He also announced that ar- 
rangements had been made for 
Clem Deneker to sneak to the 
AMPA, and Deneker was in- 
vited to attend the lunch next 
Thursday. Seats should be at 
a premium. 



Allied Release 

Woods-Buchanan-Harris Productions 

To Go Through Abrams' 

Organization 

Allied Authors, Inc., the Frank 
Woods-Thompson Buchanan-Elmer 
Harris combination, will release 
through Allied Artists Corp. Hiram 
Abrams admitted this yesterday, but 
said he could add nothing at the 
moment regarding the first release or 
just how many pictures were included 
in the contract. 

It will be recalled that shortly after 
Woods resigned as producing director 
for Famous Players he, together with 
Buchanan and Harris, formed the 
above named organization to produce 
their own pictures. It has reported 
at various times that Penrhyn Stan- 
laws would join the trio but this 
has never been verified. 



WARNERS CLOSE 

BELASCOiMAL 



Will Have Active Aid of Great Stage Producer in Preparation of 
Scenarios and Also in Cutting and Titling Belasco Successes 

First Three Set 



Flint in Town 
Motley Flint, well known Coast 
financier, head of the Los Angeles 
Savings & Trust Co., arrived yester- 
day. 



Arbuckle Starts Production 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
'' Los Angeles — Roscoe Arbuckle has 
started work on a two-reel comedy 
'iere for the Screen Comedy Com- 
pany, an organization backed by San 
Francisco money. 



Warner Brothers, through a deal closed yesterday, have 
brought to the screen the greatest theatrical producer of Amer- 
ica — David Belasco. 

According to the contract, and an understanding reached 
between the great stage craftsman and the Warners, Belasco 
will aid in the preparation of the continuity and will oversee the 
completed productions before they are cut and titled so that 
the pictures may have the benefit of his vast experience. 

The first three Belasco productions 
to be made by Warners include, "The 
Gold Diggers," "Daddies" and "De- 
burau." Two of these will be in 



Cohen Leaves Fox 

Harry J. Cohen has resigned from 
the foreign department of Fox. 



Going to Coast 

Harry Fields, formerly with Fox, 
now with United Artists, leaves for 
the coast today. 

Edgar Lewis leaves on Sunday and 
plans to start production shortly after 
his arrival. 




readiness for next season. There is 
a possibility of "Tiger Rose" and 
"Kiki," both with Lenore Ulric in 
the star parts also going to Warners 
in the early future. It is understood 
that upwards of $250,000 figured in 
the deal, and in addition Belasco will 
have a sharing arrangement in the 
profits of the productions. 

As a result of the closing of the 
transaction, it would not be surpris- 
ing if Belasco and his general man- 
ager, Ben F. Roeder, visited the 
Warner studios in Hollywood next 
summer. 

The deal between Warners and 
Belasco was started early in the Fall. 



Many efforts have been made to 
interest Belasco in picture making. 
A few of his plays have been sold 
as picture material, only recently 
First National having purchased 
"The Girl of the Golden West." But 
all efforts to secure co-operation of 
(Continued on Page 4) 



When 
an old 
herself 
to the 



"Dot" dressed up in boy's clothing and stowed herself away on 
New Bedford whaler, she never realized the excitement she had let 
in for. A night scene from the Hodkinson super-special, "Down 
Sea in Ships."— Advt. 



Powers Back from Coast 
P. A. Powers of the F. B. O., re- 
turned yesterday from the Coast. He 
is enthusiastic regarding the produc- 
tion schedule, and says there are eight 
units at work for F. B. O.: the 
Harry Carev company; Ethel Clay- 
ton, George O'Hara in the Witw-er 
series, "Fighting Blood," Carter De 
Haven: Tane Novak, Warner Baxter 
and Derlvs Perdue. In addition 
Emory Johnson, whose Inira 
Alarm" has just been released, is 
working on a letter carrier story. 



THE 




Vol XXIII No. 1 1 Friday, Jan. i2, 1923 Prices Cents 



Copyright 1923. Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 
J. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$13.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 
Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau, Prague (Czecho- Slo- 
vakia), Wenzelsplatz. 



Quotations 

High Low CIom Sale* 

East. Kod. 97 96 96 2,200 

F. P.-L. .. 893/ 4 88y 2 88% 3,000 

do pfd Not quoted 

Goldwyn . 6% 6 6% 500 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's .. 18% \9Vi 19J4 1,300 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 



Incorporations 

Dover, Del. — California Cinema 
Corp., capital $2,500,000. 



Trenton, N. J. — Aurora Studios 
Corp., capital $40,000. 



Dover, Del. — Forston Productions, 
Inc.. capital $1,650,000. 



Dover, Del. — World Amus. Service 
Assoc, capital $3,400,000, F. R. Han- 
sell. 



Harrisburg.Pa. — General Amus. 
Corp., capital $10,000, incorporators, 
F. R. Hansell. J. V. Pimm and E. 
MacFarland. 



Dover, Del.— Instructive Film So- 
ciety of Amer., capital $300,000, in- 
corporations, R. Hansell, J. V. Pimm, 
E. M. MacFarland. 



(l&cLuxztional (/ZctuAJD 




THE SPICE OF THE PROGRA.V 



P 




■g^k 



DAILY 



Friday, January 12, 1923 



Brockell On Long Trip 

Floyd M. Brockell has started on 
a trip around the country that will 
take him into Mexico and Canada. 
He will return to New York March 
17th. 



Dave Thompson With Fox 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Dave Thompson, 
formerly with Metro, is now manag- 
ing the Fox Sunshine Comedies, suc- 
ceeding Horace Hand, who is handl- 
ing the business end of production. 



"White Rose" Unit Going South 
"The White Rose" unit, Griffith 
directing, leaves for Miami, Ft. 
Lauderdale and New Orleans in 
about two weeks for exteriors. Hal 
Sintenzich, cameraman, is working 
with Hendrik Sartov on the produc- 
tion. 



Weiss Buys One Reelers 

Louis Weiss, of Artclass, has pur- 
chased a series of 18 one-reelers from 
Samuel R. Newman, of the British 
Exhibitors Films, Ltd., of London. 
The titles include "The Merchant of 
Venice," "Bleak House," "The Scar- 
let Letter," "The Hunch Back of 
Notre Dame," "Vanity Fair," "Mac 
beth," "A Tale of Two Cities" and 
others. 



Metro Bids, Too 

(Continued from Page 1) 
At the Lesser offices it was stated 
that Jackie's father feels that the time 
has arrived for Jackie to branch out 
on his own as a full-fledged producer. 

"Oliver Twist" is now playing first- 
run engagements throughout the 
country. "Daddy," the next on the 
Coogan schedule through First Na- 
tional, will be released in about three 
months. "Toby Tyler" will also be 
a First National release along in the 
summer, and that is as far as the 
Lesser deal with First National goes. 

When Hiram Abrams was asked 
yesterday what he knew of the Fair- 
banks' deal with Coogan, he said: 

"If true, it looks mighty good to 
me." 



Found West Prosperous 

John E. Storey, Pathe general rep- 
resentative, has returned from the 
West where he found business good 
in San Francisco and Los Angeles. 
The only depressed conditions he met 
with were limited to the small wheat 
belt south of Spokane and to the 
apple area in the same district, where 
much of the crop had been left on 
the ground. In Salt Lake City, 
Denver and other interior cities he 
found business much improved. 



Brooks on 10 Week Trip 

E. O. Brooks, Pathe serial sales 
manager, left Saturday for a 10- 
wceks' visit to Pacific Coast cities. 



CHAS. 0. BAUMANN, 



Pre*. 



RESOURCES - $5,00C ">00 
— LEGAL RATES - 



PRODUCERS & STARS 

represented. Also every form of 
financial service rendered in connec- 
tion therewith — at legal rates. 



GREAT NORTHERN FINANCE CORP. 

Knickerbocker Building 

Bro«dw»y at 42nd Street, N. Y. City 
Telephone Bryant 2989 



Fox's "Salome" Revived 

The Fox offices announced yester- 
day that a revival of "Salome" would 
be released on the 14th. 



Paramount Managers Here 

M. Kempner, Albany manager and 
Allan Moritz, Buffalo manager for 
Famous are in town. 



"Four Horsemen" Revival 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — A revival of "The 

Four Horsemen" will open soon at 

Miller's Theater for an indefinite 

run. 



Percy and Cody Added to Schenck 
Cast 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

yLos Angeles — Eileen Percy and 
Lew Cody have been added to the 
cast of "Within the Law," now 
being directed by Frank Lloyd. 



International , distributers j)f: 
MOTION ^PICTTU RES ' 



Ihter-Ocean Film CorporaT i<3tf 



I N T E R-O C EAN B tlltL)!^ 

218 WEST 42nd STV''" iNtW.^Ttfe 

BRY ANT •7'812-' ;: . "'V~ 

WHEN YOU •'TH'lJi'k. 'd'F ' 
' FOREIGN ;THIflK v ' OF. : 

3EN TERMSM 



ART TITLES 

LOUIS MEYER 

Crafts: i en Film Lab. 

251 West 19th St. 

Watkins 7260-7461 



The Preferred 8 — 

RICH MEN'S WIVES 

A Gasnier Production 

THORNS AND ORANGE BLOSSOMS 

A Gasnier Production 

POOR MEN'S WIVES 

Directed by Gasnier 

THE GIRL WHO CAME BACK 

Directed by Tom Forman 



SHADOWS 

A Tom Forman Production 

THE HERO 

A Gasnier Production 

ARE YOU A FAILURE? 

Directed by Tom Forman 

APRIL SHOWERS 

Directed by Tom Forman 



These tremendous box office attractions are backed up by 

elaborate advertising, exploitation, publicity and the personal 

guarantee of 

Al. Lichtman 

President Al. Lichtman Corporation 



Produced by 
Preferred 
Pictures, Inc. 

B~ 



P. Schulberg, Pres. J. G. Bachmann, Treas. 



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Warner-Belasco Deal 

(Continued troro Page 1) 

Beiasco in production have so far 
tailed. Because of the nature of tne 
deal just closed with Warner 
brothers this is important, r-or it 
means that Beiasco will aid the War- 
ners in the preparation of the scripts, 
and also give them the benefit of his 
knowledge in the cutting and titling 
of the pictures before they are re- 
leased. While this will not be 
"supervision," as it is generally 
understood in production, it prac- 
tically amounts to the same thing, ex- 
cepting that Beiasco will not sit in 
on the "rushes," and suggest changes, 
ur retakes. And while this will be 
lacking, it is understood that the 
warners plan to arrange to hold all 
ttieir cast after the completion of a 
ijelasco production so that if such 
cnanges must be made to meet 
Helasco's wishes it can be done. 

David Beiasco probably holds the 
highest position of any theatrical pro- 
ducer in America. His artistic 
touches and the completeness with 
which he invests a stage production, 
has long been acknowledged in the 
theater. It is understood that as 
part of the deal, all the appointments, 
costumes and accessories used by 
Beiasco in the various stage produc- 
tions will go to Warners, to be used 
in the pictures. This should aid in 
giving the Beiasco atmosphere to the 
productions. 

Whether or not the David Warfield 
successes, all directed and produced 
by Beiasco, will be included eventu- 
ally in the deal, is an interesting 
problem. Warfield is a close as- 
sociate of Beiasco. But he is also 
very close to Marcus Loew of Metro. 
Many in the business believe that if 
"The Music Master," "The Auc- 
tioneer" and other Warfield suc- 
cesses are picturized, that they will 
go to Metro. 



Hill, Editor of Fox News 
Edward C. Hill, a N. Y. Herald 
man, has been appointed editor of 
Fox News, succeeding Don Hancock. 



Gleichman Loses F. P. Suit 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Lansing, Mich. — The position of 
Phil Gleichman, owner of the Broad- 
way Strand, Detroit, for a writ of 
mandamus, to keep in force a tem- 
porary injunction, designed to compel 
Famous Players to give him the ex- 
clusive right to exhibit their produc- 
tions, has been denied by the State 
S ipreme Court. 

Gleichman, according to the papers 
filed, entered a contract with the cor- 
poration, after it had advanced him 
money to buy out a partner in the 
theater, to exhibit only Paramount 
pictures. The contract, Gleichman al- 
leges, was made in 1919, for a period 
of five years, and was intended to give 
him exclusive rights to the Para- 
mount product. In 1922, Gleichman 
charged, Famous refused to give him 
the exclusive r'^hts for that year. 

Gleichman asked the Supreme 
Court for a writ of mandamus to dis- 
solve Judge Richter's order, setting 
aside a temporary injunction that had 
been granted.The Supreme Court af- 
firmed Judge Richter's order and de- 
nied Gleichman's petition. 




Coast Brevities 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Hollywood — Hobart Bosworth will 
make a tour of the world, starting 
sometime next fall. 



"Heads Up" starring Hoot Gibson 
has been finished at Universal. 



Grant Carpentier has joined the 
scenario staff of Warner Bros. 



Shannon Day will leave shortly for 
New York for a brief visit. 



Monty Banks is now making a 
comedy, "Four O'Clock in the Morn- 
ing." 



Fred Niblo and his wife, Enid Ben- 
nett, have left on a vacation trip to 
Mexico. 



"The Eleventh Hour" and "Mod- 
ern Monte Cristo" are being produced 
by Fox now. 



,r Roy Klaffki has left Metro to be- 
come superintendent of photography 
for Goldwyn. 



"Red Darkness," the Fox picture 
featuring John Gilbert, is being cast 
by Jerome Storm. 



Otto Lederer has been signed by 
Metro for an important role in "Your 
Friend and Mine." 



Edwin Carewe is here from New 
York with a staff to produce David 
Belasco's, "The Girl of the Golden 
West." 



Mary Miles Minter's, "Trail of the 
Lonesome Pine" company has return- 
ed to the Paramount studio after 
several weeks on location. 



Hobart Bosworth has completed 
the continuity of "The Silent Skip- 
per." Production will start as soon 
as "The Blood Ship" is finished 



Walter Miller has been engaged to 
appear in "The Go Getter," by Peter 
B. Kyne. E. H. Griffith is directing 
the film for Cosmopolitan. 



Reginald Barker and staff have left 
for Northern California to seek ex- 
teriors for "The Law-Bringers " his 
next production for Mayer and Metro. 



The Anchor Film Distributors, Inc. 
have added to their staff Hal Norflett, 
general sales manager; Frank Caven- 
dar, assistant to President Morris R. 
Schlank; Harry J. Howard, editor. 



Following is Ethel Clayton's sup- 
porting cast in "The Greater Glory": 
Carrie Clark Ward, Clarissa Selwyn, 
Fred Esmelton, Albert Lee, Malcolm 
MacGregor, Albert Hart, Baby 
Muriel, Anderson Smith, Wilfred 
Lucas and Victory Bateman. 


Marshall Neilan's next for Gold- 
wyn will be "The Ingrate," an orig- 
inal story by himself and adapted by 
Carey Wilson. Cast will include 
Hobart Bosworth, Claire Windsor, 
Raymond Griffith, Bessie Love, Tom 
Gallery, and George Cooper. 

H. E. GAUSMAN. 



DAILY 



Friday, January 12, 1923 



1 KEYSTONE COMEDY REVIVAL 


We are now ready to negotiate with 


men of good business standing and finan- 


cial responsibility, 


to become our repre- 


sentatives in the following cities: 


Portland, Me. 


South Bend, Ind. 


Manchester, N. H. 


Chicago, 111. 


Boston, Mass. 


Peoria, 111. 


Springfield, Mass. 


Milwaukee, Wis. 


Providence, R. I. 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


New Haven, Conn. 


Des Moines, la. 


New York City 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Wichita, Kan. 


Albany, N. Y. 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Joplin, Mo. 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


Little Rock, Ark. 


Newark, N. J. 


Houston, lexas 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Dallas, Texas 


Wilkesbarre, Pa. 


San Antonio, Texas 


Pittsburg, Pa. 


El Paso, Texas 


Baltimore, Md. 


Oklahoma City, Okla. 


Washington, D. C. 


Omaha, Neb. 


Richmond, Va. 


Sioux Falls, S. D. 


Charlotte, N. C. 


Fargo, N. D. 


Columbia, S. C. 


Denver, Colorado 


Atlanta, Ga. 


Butte, Montana 


Jacksonville, Fla. 


Salt Lake City, Utah 


Montgomery, Ala. 


Los Angeles, Cal. 


New Orleans, La. 


San Francisco, Cal. 


Memphis, Term. 


Fresno, Cal. 


Nashville, Tenn. 


Portland, Oregon 


Louisville, Ky. 


Seattle, Wash. 


Charleston, West Va. 


Spokane, Wash. 


Columbus, Ohio. 


Vancouver, B. C. 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


Calgary, Alta. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Regina, Sask. 


Toledo, Ohio 


Winnipeg, Manitoba 


Detroit, Mich. 


Toronto, Ont. 


Grand Rapids, Mich. 


Montreal, Quebec 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


St. Johns, N. B. 


TRI-STONE 


PICTURES, Inc. 


STRAUS 


BUILDING 


565 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY 1 


TRIANGLE H. E 


. Aitken KEYSTONE 


PICTURES Oscar A. Price COMEDIES 



Inspiration 
Pictures, Inc., 
Charles H. 
Duell, Pres., 
presents 




There never has been 
a greater drama of 
the sea! That's the 
absolute truth. 



Our Dick 



and Best 



A^irAt notional, 
^Picture 



RICHARD BARTHELMESS 



with 



Miss Dorothy Gish 



in 



9 



reels of surging drama that will sweep them 
off their feet with the irresistible force of the 
storm lashed seas. 



DIRECTED BY HENRY KING 

Written by Edmund Goulding 

Roy F. Overbaugh, Cameraman 
Robert M. Haas, Art Director 



9 



It's a Current Release! 



THE 



Steamer Sailings 

Sailing of steamers for foreign 
ports, with time of sailings, destina- 
tions and points for which they carry 
mail are as follows: 

Saturday 

Lapland sails at 12 M. for Antwerp ; 
mails close at 8 A. M. for Europe, Africa 
and West Asia, (Cork, Queenstown, Scot- 
land, Canaries and Northern Europe, spe- 
cially addressed). Albania sails at 12 M. 
for Liverpool; mails close at 8 A. M. for 
Cork and Queenstown, (other parts of Ire- 
land and other countries, specially addressed). 
Columbia sails at 12 M. for Glasgow; mails 
close at 8 A. M. for Scotland, (other 
countries, specially addressed). Drotting- 
holm sails at 12 M. for Gothenberg; mails 
close at 8.30 A. M. for Norway, Denmark, 
Sweden and Finland. Asia sails at 2 P. M. 
for Constanza; mads close at 11.30 A. M. 
for Azores and Portugal (Turkey -and 
Rumania, specially addressed). Fort St. 
George sails at 11 A. M. for Hamilton; 
mads close at 7.30 A. M. tor Bermuda. 
Siboney sails at 11 A. M. for Havana; mails 
close at 8 A. M. for Cuba, (specially ad- 
dressed). Nautic sails at 11 A. M. for 
Nassau; mails close at 8 A. M. for Bahamas, 
(specially addressed). Porto Rico sads at 
12 M. for San Juan; mails close at 8.30 A. 
M. for Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands. 
Caracas sails at 12 M. for La Guayra; 
mails close at 8.30 A. M. for Curacao and 
Venezuela, (Porto Rico, specially addressed). 
Silvia sails at 10 A. M. for St. John's; mails 
close at 7 A. M. for New Foundland. South 
American sails at 1 P. M. for Barahonia ; 
mails close at 11 A. M. for Turks Island 
and the Dominican Republic. Ulua sails at 
12 M. for Port Limon ; mails close at 9 A. 
M. for Costa Rica (Cuba, Jamaica, Canal 
Zone and Panama, specially addressed). 
Araguaya sails at 11 A. M. for Hamilton; 
mails close at 9 A. M. for Bermuda. Tur- 
rialba sails at 12 M. for Tela; mails close 
at 9 A. M. for Guatemala, Salvador and 
Honduras. V'auban sails at 12 M. for 
Buenos Ayres; mails close at 10 A. M. for 
Barbados, St. Lucia, Guiana, Brazil, Ar- 
gentina and Uruguay. Cuthbert sails at 1 
P. M. for Manaos; mails close at 11 A. M. 
for Xorth Brazil and Iquitos ; Morristown 
sails at 12 M. for Helsingfors; mails close 
at 9 A. M. for Denmark and Finland, 
(specially addressed). 



■%2H 



DAILY 



Friday, January 12, 192 



Baer Starts on His Own 

Fred E. Baer has started an inde- 
pendent advertising and publicity 
service with offices in the State Bldg. 



Two New "U" Managers 
Harry Bernstein has been ap- 
pointed manager of Universal's Buf- 
falo office and Robert Eperson at 
Salt Lake. 



"Peg" Going into Capitol 

The Capitol will show "Peg O' My 
Heart" the week of Jan. 21. Other 
pictures slated for runs there are 
"Gimme," week of Jan. 14; "Robin 
Hood," week of Jan. 28, and in all 
likelihood, the week of Feb. 4 and 
"The Christian," week of Feb. 11. 



Philadelphia Notes 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Philadelphia — The Elm has been 
sold to A. Brown. 



The Diamond Theater on German- 
town Ave. will be opened Feb. 1. 



Jack Brown has been appointed 
sales manager of the theater division 
of the Solar Eng. Co. 



Because of the growth of the Mast- 
baum course in scenario writing, plans 
are being formulated for the erection 
of a building to house the school. 



Henry Neely, of the Eve. Public 
Ledger, was the chief speaker at the 
recent meeting of the Film Board of 
Trade at the Hotel Vendig. 



St. Louis Notes 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
St. Louis — Negotiations are under 
way, whereby the Illmo Amus. Co. 
will acquire several more local houses 
within a week. 



David Ittsel has been appointed 
manager of the Rivoli. 



F. L. Cornwell, owner of the Del 
Monte, is recuperating after a serious 

illness. 



Phil Longdon has been transferred 
from Goldwyn's Cincinnati exchange 
to the local office. 



Oscar Cantnor, Paramount sales- 
man, is recuperating from an opera- 
tion, necessitated by throat affection. 



G. E. York, watchman of the Lyric 
has confessed that he was implicated 
'ii the recent $5,000 robbery. 



Theo. Anton, manager of the 

Lowell, received a fractured skull 

from a robber, while leaving the 
theater. 



The E, K. Love Realty Cp. have 
made a loan of $125,000 for five 
years, on the Strand property, to 
Frank Tate and his associates, who 
recently purchased the house. 



Henley May Direct Dean Film 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Hobart Henley will 
probably direct Priscilla Dean in "A 
Lady of Quality," which Universal 
plans to release in December. 



"U" Buys Three Stories 

Universal has purchased three 
stories, one an original by William 
J. Flynn titled "Souls That Pass in 
the Night"; "The Self Made Wife," 
by Elizabeth Alexander and "Blinky" 
by Gene Markey. 



Forman's Next Finished 

"The Girl Who Came Back," Tom 
Forman's next for Preferred has been 
completed. 



Against Daylight Saving 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Baltimore — Exhibitors held a meet- 
ing Sunday to protest against day- 
light saving. 



Urbach Becomes Publisher 
Larry Urbach, who for some time 
past has been advertising manager 
of the Motion Picture Journal, the 
local regional publication has become 
managing editor and publisher, suc- 
ceeding Tom Hamlin who has retired 
to devote his time to his advertising 
service. 



Callahan Held in Bail for Jury 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Atlantic City, N. J. — Jimmie Cal- 
lahan, alleged head of the Callahan 
M. P. Corp., producers of Callahan 
comedies, is held under bail of $500 
to appear before the January Grand 
Jury. Callahan was recently given 
a preliminary hearing on a charge of 
obtaining money under false pre- 
tenses on complaint of Mrs. Ernesta 
Vanucci and George Gunn. the latter 
former secretary of the company. 



Guts and Flashes 

Joe W. Farnham, title writer at 
Miami and Palm Beach for the 
month. 



Louise Lovely is making her debut 
on the stage in an act called, "A Day 
at the Studio." 



"Dark Secrets," starring Dorothy 
Dalton and "The Leopardess," star- 
ring Alice Brady are being edited at 
the Paramount studio in Long Island. 



Nazimova is rehearsing "Dagmar," 
in which she will return to the stage. 
The play will open Jan. 15 at the 
Majestic, Buffalo. 



Thomas Meighan has presented to 
the Actor's Home Fund a picture 
machine. The films are contributed 
by Famous Players. 



Two thousand, one hundred fifty- 
six patrons were doctored at the 
Capitol by the medical attendants, 
during the past year, according to the 
Capitol press department. 



YOU DON'T HAVE TO 
TELL THE WORLD 

We appreciate how a great 
many business men feel about 
discussing their financial affairs. 
You will find our service con- 
fidential, sympathetic, speedy 
and effective. Bring your 
problem to us. We specialize 
in financing film propositions. 

CHROMOS TRADING CO. 



1123 Broadway 



Suite 616 



'Phone Chelsea 8284 



SALESMAN 

Old established firm desires salesman who 
has a wide personal acquaintance and is 
thoroughly experienced in selling motion 
picture display accessories direct to pro- 
ducers and distributors. To the high grade 
man who can rhow results, we have a 
wonderful proposition. State full experience. 
All communications will be held in strict 
confidence. 

Box SS-30 c/o The Film Daily 



are y&ivf<mm£ 




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Property Present Your Photoplay 



NEGATIVE TITLES 

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Through our revolutionizing process- \ 
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You've heard it, haven't you? 
The famous American household favorite for generations- 



a 



LOVE'S OLD SWEET SONG" 



'his is the title of a new 

Lund Production 

With an All-Star Cast 



Tone Up Your Box-Office With This Title r 

N0RCA PICTURES, Inc. 1540 Broadway, N.Y. City 



THE 



riday, January 12, 1923 




-- ■ '■ <i 



Announcing 

for 

Independent Exchanges 

MALCOLM STRAUSS' 



SA 





M 




A Sensational Spectacle of Magnificence, 

Thrills and Passion 

With a Distinguished Cast Including 

DIANA ALLEN, CHRISTINE WINTHROP 
and VINCENT COLEMAN 

Distributed by 

GEORGE H. WILEY, Inc. 

220 West 42nd Street, New York City 



Territories Already Sold 



Western Pennsylvania and 
Southern New Jersey 



Greater New York and 
Northern New Jersey 

Apollo Exchange, Inc. Imperial Pictures 

1600 Broadway New York City 1302 Vine St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Maryland, Delaware, District of Columbia and Virginia 

Federated Film Exchange of Baltimore, Inc. 

412 E. Baltimore St., Baltimore, Md. 501 Mather Bldg., Washington, D. C. 




DABLY 



Friday, January 12, 192 



Putting It Over 



Here is how a brother exhibitor put his show over. Send along 
vour ideas. Let the other fellow know hoie you cleaned up. 



That "Personal" Angle in Letters 

Baltimore — The New Metropolitan, 
one of Baltimore's latest neighbor- 
hood houses, started off on the right 
foot applying the personal touch to 
their patronage. 

Leslie F. Whelan, Paramount ex- 
ploiteer, wrote the letter signed 
"Marjorie Daw," the leading-lady of 
"The Pride of Palomar," the christen- 
ing picture, praising the theater and 
the picture. 

"Miss Daw's" letter went on chat- 
ting about her movie work and its 
never-ending study and effort to en- 
tertain and please you. 

Neat, tasteful letter-heads were 
printed up and the letters were dated 
and post-marked New York City. 
Although they were prepared in 
Baltimore. Whelan shipped them to 
New York where they were dropped 
in the mail slot. 



Pointers on Value of the Simple Life 

Martinsville, Va. — Martinsville's 
ambitions is to raise its 5,000 popula- 
tion to 10,000, and the big guns of 
the town tremble with the thought 
that the young folks may travel the 
jazz age. 

Leslie F. Whelan saw that the 
Henry County Semi-Weekly Bulletin, 
was spouting editorially on the sub- 
ject so he gave them an idea. "Mar- 
tinsville must return to the code of 
"The Old Homestead." Simple de- 
votion, love, fire-sides, mother's 
doughnuts, that's what Martinsville 
must get back to." 

This is the fifth town to be sold 
on such a campaign. In Martinsville, 
the Bulletin claimed that at their 
request the exhibitor booked the pic- 
ture to show the town what the 
simple life was like. 



Using the Badge 

Owensboro, Ky. — Bob Werth, 
Metro salesman, took advantage of a 
new fire truck to exploit the showing 
of "Quincv Adams Sawyer" at G. M. 
Pedley's Grand Theater. 

Bob was seated in his hotel when 
he heard the fire truck's lusty siren 
and gong and a moment later he saw 
the big white machine riding by. He 
inquired and learned that it was a 
recent addition and was being display- 
ed for the edification of the natives. 

That gave him his idea, and a few 
minutes later he was in a sign paint- 
er's office ordering two large canvas 
signs to read. "Quincv Adams Saw- 
ver. The Grand. Dec. 25, 26, 27 and 
28 Greatest of all super-pictures." 

He then called in the fire chief and 
finally landed the privilege of having 
the truck exploit the show. Bob is 
affiliated with the St. Louis fire fight- 
ers and his local badge proved the 
clinching argument with the Owens- 
boro chief. 

Pedley and his manager. M. Clark, 
helped work the tie-up. The display 
attracted much attention and was the 
means of bringing many to see the 
show during the picture's run. 



Distributes Match Boxes 

Indianapolis — One of the effective 
features of an extensive campaign 
recently put across at the Apollo, on 
"Lights of New York," was the dis- 
tribution of 10,000 match boxes, each 
bearing advertising of the picture, and 
distributed in restaurants, cafes, 
hotels and cigar stores. This method 
of exploitation proved very success- 
ful; every time a match was lit on 
the box, the attention of the holder 
was drawn to the announcement of 
the picture on the covers. 



Boston Theater Distribues Oranges 

Boston — To encourage creative re- 
cipes from the housewives of Boston 
and as an exploitation stunt for 
"Douglas Fairbanks in Robin Hood," 
playing at the Park, the American 
and the theater got together on a tie- 
up by which 10 crates of oranges 
direct from the Douglas Fairbanks 
orange grove in California were given 
for the ten best recipes for ways in 
which the orange may be used for 
table purposes. The American 
printed the recipes daily. They cov- 
ered cakes, pies, marmalades and 
countless delicacies from the orange. 



jf Bonns-Ferguson "Teasers" 
r Eddie Bonns, and W. R. Ferguson, 
of Goldwyn, devised an unusual line 
of teasers for "The Strangers' Ban- 
quet " at the Capitol. 

Five thousands cards with the pic- 
ture of a chair printed in yellow on 
a black background, furnished with 
a string by which it could be tied to 
telephone receivers, door-knobs, 
automobile, etc., were distributed. 

Fifteen thousand six-inch rulers 
were distributed particularly in 
offices. The Capitol mailed out 5,000 
of them. 

A herald in the shape of a bottle 
was used freely. It was green and 
black printed on white. It had two 
seals on it — the Goldwyn seal and 
the Neilan seal. Across the label 
was printed "23 star Brand of 
Sparkling entertainment." On the 
inside of the herald were the names 
of the star, a toast, etc., the name 
of the theater and of showiner. Ten 
thousand paner napkins, folded to 
form a triangle with "Marshall 
Neilan's supreme screen achievempnt 
of 1923." etc.. printed on it, were dis- 
tributed in restaurants, cafes, and 
other places. Ten thousand tooth- 
picks in panpr envelopes, on which 
was printed "Peopfrmint flavored. 
Marshall Neilan's 'The Grangers' 
Banquet,' etc.," were also distributed. 

An imitation engraved invitation 
suggesting that the recipient attend 
a show, was mailed to a selected list. 
Fnclosed was a printed menu for 
"The Strangers' Banquet " a twenty- 
three star course. The name of a 
plavrr in the cast was used in con- 
nection with each dish. A special 
bonk of toasts was prepared. 






What the Critics 

Said of the Play 

SUCCESS 



A strong heart story, 
with the proper ming- 
ling of pathos and hu- 
mor. * * * It is a sweet, 
green spot in the des- 
ert of clap-trap and 
unhealthful sex appeal 
that has characterized 
the stage far too long. 
PITTSBURGH PRESS. 

Something rare and 
fine * * * turned out to 
be an artistic romance 
built around a charac- 
ter as beautiful and dis- 
tinctive as has been 
conceived since "The 
Music Master" first 
charmed American au- 
diences a dozen years 
ago. 
BOSTON AMERICAN. 

There seems to be 
an undeniably human 
quality in the theme 
that finds a responsive 
chord on the part of the 
audience. 

BOSTON GLOBE. 



'Success" makes a popu 
lar appeal, and any play that 
does that meets the severest 
test of all. We can think of 
no other play except "The 
Music Master" that in re- 
cent years got such a grip on 
the public heartstrings as 
did "Success." To brighten 
so pathetic a drama with 
humorous lines and situa- 
tions, gives the public just 
what it wants most of the 
time. 

Bitter and sweet never 
revealed more beautifully 
than in the comedy-drama 
"Success." 

Its sunshine and shadows, 
its heavens and hells, its pits 
of dispair and its light-kissed 
heights of victory, are told 
in a way that can never be 
forgotten. 

N. Y. AMERICAN. 



All This and More Will 
Be Said of The Picture 



iTHE 

tie BRADSTREET 
of FILMDOM 





ZkRECOCMIZEl 

Authority 




r ol. XXIII No. 12 



Saturday, January 13, 1923 



Price 5 Cents 



Loew Books 36 

ew York Circuit Contracts for Bulk 
of Paramount's "Super 39" — 
Three in the Balance 

Nicholas Schenck, of Loew circuit, 
is closed an important booking con- 
act with Famous Players, whereby 
ie metropolitan Loew circuit will 
iow 36 of the next group of 39 
aramount pictures. 
While it is true that the Loew 
lain has shown a large portion of 
e Paramount output as a regular 
ing for some time past, it is also 
fact that the U. B. O. time has 
cured a portion of the product, 
his new deal, however, gives the 
oew office all the pictures with the 
xeption of three Cosmopolitan Pro- 
lctions, "The 9th Commandment," 
rhe Go Getter" and "Adam and 
va." It is understood that Ihere 
ill be no difficulty over these three 
id that, after screening, they will 
so be included in the transaction, 
he amount of money involved is 
msiderable. 



Leon Schwartz Here 

Leon Schwartz, Pathe distributor 
the Dutch East Indies, is in New 
ork en route to Paris. 



Theater for Coney Island 

A theater and office building will be 
ected on the site of the Culver 
ilroad depot at Coney Island, under 
result of a lease made by the B. 
. T. to the Alhvell Development 
>., for 31 years at an aggregate 
ntal of $850,000. Taxes and other 
arges will bring the amount up to 
,200,000. 

Shampan & Shampan have been 
gaged to draw plans for the build- 

y 

The plot is 244 ft. on Surf Ave., 
tending back 650 ft. The building 
be erected will contain offices, 
Dres and a theater to seat 2,500. 




"Secrets of Paris," at the Cameo theatre this week, is a thoroughly en- 
tertaining picture. Good direction is coupled with an unusually able cast. 
Sue's book is full of the sort of material precisely suited to the screen," 
N. Y. Evening Mail. — Advt. 



The Troubles of an 
Exhibitor 

ear Film Daily: 

Well, Xmas wa^ sure good to us. 
3r the first time since I bought the 
rvecentodeon, I did capacity with 
r laming Ventricle;" a heart interest 
pry. It's a bear. You can get be- 
nd it and clean up. 
I played to eighty cents more on 
e day (only open after seven) than I 
d with any other show. My Xmas 
!Ow itself didn't arrive, so I put on 
concert. I had a local zither agent 
monstrate his instrument, the local 
anola guy play his newest rolls and 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Bonus Forwarded 

$5C0,000 Wired to Coogans by Metro 
For Four Productions 

The biggest bonus ever given in 
the business, $500,000, was forwarded 
by Metro Pictures last night to Jackie 
Coogan, Sr., by wire. This cash 
transaction closed the deal, which will 
result in Metro releasing four Jackie 
Coogan pictures, immediately follow- 
ing the completion of Coogan's con- 
tract with Sol Lesser. 

While details of the deal are not 
forthcoming, in view of Coogan's 
arrangement with Lesser, in all likeli- 
hood they will show that Coogan 
is to secure the bulk of the earnings 
of his pictures. Metro to secure a 
share for distribution, plus a part of 
the gross after a certain figure has 
been reached. "Oliver Twist," which 
is being released through First Na- 
tional, is understood to be out on an 
exhibition value of $2,000,000. 

It is understood that First National 
made a strong effort to secure 
Coogan, and Doug Fairbanks and 
several others were interested in 
obtaining Jackie. But the half 
million cash offered by Metro 
knocked the pins from under the 
others. Marcus Loew started ne- 
gotiations for the Coogan pictures 
when he was on the Coast. 



Keaton to Metro 

Buster to Make Full Length Com- 
edies — Deal Closed in Los 
Angeles 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — It is stated here that 
Buster Keaton has signed a contract 
with Metro under the terms of which 
he will make a series of feature length 
comedies. The first one is now in 
production. 



Marcus Loew stated yesterday that 
the news embodied in the cast dis- 
patch was news to him. Keaton 
recently announced he would devote 
bis time to productions of feature 
length in favor of two reelers. 



Classics in One Reel Form 

Of the 18 one-reelers acquired by 
Artclass there are at least three which 
are either current or will be shortly, 
in feature form. These are "Vanity 
Fair," "The Hunchback of Notre 
Dame" and "Oliver Twist." The first 
will be released by Goldwyn as a 
Hugo Ballin Prod. "The Hunch- 
back of Notre Dame" will be one of 
the future Universal Jewels, while 
"Oliver Twist" is the current Coogan 
release. 



"A. B. G. Not Hit" 

So Says Lee Ochs Commenting on 

Switch of Haring-Blumenthal 

Theaters to Loew Chain 

"Not only is the A. B. C. not 'stag- 
gered' by the reported purchase of 
part of the Haring and Blumenthal 
circuit by the Loew chain as reported 
in a weekly paper but we are not even 
bothered," said Lee A. Ochs, presi- 
dent of the A. B. C. yesterday. 

"We have other theaters ready to 
step in when the Haring and Blu- 
menthal houses step out," he added. 
"We are not worried. I do think, 
however, that it might be interesting 
for other distributors to ponder over 
this thong and reflect what it will 
mean to them." 

Although no contracts have been 
signed by Charles Haring and Louis 
F. Blumenthal with the Loew circuit, 
it is understood that all conflicting 
matters have been straightened out 
(Continued on Page 3) 



Laemmle Leaves Thursday 

Carl Laemmle leaves for Universal 
City on Thursday. 



Jeanie MacPherson Here 
Jeanie . MacPherson, Cecil De 
Mille's scenarist, is at the Astor. 



East Side Houses Fined 

Five East Side theaters were closed 
one day this week and each fined 
$1,000 for permitting children under 
16 to enter without a parent or guar- 
dian. 



Valentino Appeal Under Advisement 

The filing of briefs and supplemen- 
tary papers in connection with Ro- 
dolph Valentino's appeal for a re- 
argument and revision of the injunc- 
tion in favor of Famous Players was 
as far as the matter progressed in the 
Appellate Division court house yes- 
terday. A decision will be made in 
the near future. 



Plans Nation Wide Runs 
Famous Players officials make no 
secret of the fact that they consider 
"The Covered Wagon." which James 
Cruze has about completed on the 
coast one of the most important pro- 
ductions turned out by that company. 
A print is expected in New York 
about Feb. 1st, and, according to 
present plans, a series of special long- 
run engagements will be launched 
all over the country, in the same 
manner as "Knighthood." It is 
understood reports from the coast 
are enthusiastic to a marked degree, 
and that the home office officials are 
making all kinds of promis • • for its 
success. 



—. &&< 



DAILV 



Saturday, January 13, 1923 




Vol. XXIII N). 12 Saturday, Jan. 13, 1923 Price 5 Cents 



Copyright 1923, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 
. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 
Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man, The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau, Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
vakia), Wenzelsplatz. 

Quotations 

High Low Cloac Sales 

East. Kod. 97 96 96 600 

F. P.-L. .. 893/6 88^ 89^ 1,000 

do pfd. . 99 98^ 99 300 

Goldwyn . 6% 6% 6% 100 

Onnith Not quoted 

Loew's ... 19H 19 19 2,500 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 



Incorporations 

Trenton, N. J.— F. & W. Realty 
Co., Long Beach, capital, $10,000. J. 
C. Giordano. 



Albany — F. X. Pictures, Inc., 
Yonkers, capital $20,000, Attorney, M. 
L. Lesser. 



Dover, Del. — Theater & Com- 
munity Service Bureau, Inc., capital 
$50,000. 



Albany — Tricstone Pictures, Inc., 
Manhattan, capital, $25,000. Attor- 
neys, Larkin, Rathbone and Perry. 



Trenton, N. J. — Chelsea Pier Co., 
Atlantic City, capital $100,000. Wil- 
bur Zimmerman. 



Albany — Aress Amusement Co., 
Manhattan, capital, $50,000. Attor- 
ney, G. S. Youngwood. 



(T&dttcati&rial 6\ctuAjU^ || 




SALESMAN 

Wanted immediately capable of 

selling film service to churches 

and schools in N. Y. State 

National Non-Theatrical 

130 West 46th St., N. Y. 



The Troubles of an 
Exhibitor 

(Continued from Page 1) 
got a quartet together. The quartet 
was made up of three tenors and one 
contralto (four people all told) and 
then my daughter did a toe dance. It 
was her first appearance in public and 
being nervous, she suffered a broken 
joint on the second toe from the end 
of the right foot. 

The producer of "What's the Matter 
With Women's Husband's" brought 
his picture up here and gave a show 
under a tent. We exhibitors got to- 
gether and blacklisted him. I was 
the prime mover of this move. After 
the meeting and after we had put him 
cr the ban — he got in touch with all 
the other exhibitors but me and 
damned if he didn't sell them the pic- 
ture for their towns and did it by 
threatening to play under a tent if 
they didn't. I guess these exhibitors 
protective leagues aint so much if a 
guy with one sick film can break it up 
like this. Imagine what that bird 
Zukor would do if he wanted too. 

Don't tip anyone off that I own both 
theaters here, I'm working one 
against the other. I offer four bucks 
top for a feature — then the company 
writes to the other house and asks it 
how much it will pay, quoting my 
figure. I wait two days and then 
write in and offer them two bucks for 
it — then they write on and tell me 
that after deliberation I can have the 
film for four and I writes back and 
says I'm not interested at that figure 
but will give three — and they general- 
ly take it. I'm getting onto the 
tricks. I overheard two film sales- 
men talking at the railroad depot yes- 
terday — and have a lot of new ones 
to spring on the next sucker that 
comes along. 

Next time you hear from me I'll be 
at Los Angeles where the papers ad- 
vises pro and con. 

Hope you have a happy new year — 
it don't look so good to me. 
Sincerely, 

CLEM DENEKER 



Try Out Stereopticon Film 
Perfect Pictures gave a demon- 
stration of its stereopticon film at the 
Flushing theater in Flushing yester- 
day. 



"Girl I Loved" Preview 

' (Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Charles Ray recently 
gave a preview of his latest, "The 
Girl 1 Loved," to 200 invited guests 
at the Beverly Hills Hotel. 



Stiffer Penalties for Censor Violators 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Harrisburg, Pa. — The Commission 
for the Re-organization of the State 
Government, appointed in 1921, by 
Gov. Sproul; has presented a plan to 
the legislature, to amend the present 
censorship laws, making the penalties 
for violators much more severe. The 
report in part reads: 

"An amendment is hereby submit- 
ted to the Motion Picture Act of May 
15, 1915, P. L. 534, to provide for 
additional, and severer penalties in 
cases of second and subsequent of- 
fenses." 

The existing fine for an offense is 
not less than $25 and not more than 
$50. The amendment proposes a fine 
for a second offense of not less than 
$50 and not more than $100, and for 
a third offense, a fine of from $100 to 
$200. 



Leave for Northwest 
Bert Van Tuyle and Nell Shipman 
leave for the Northwest today to 
resume production. 



CHAS. 0. BAUMANN, p re 

RESOURCES - $5.CC0,0C0 
— LEGAL RATES - 



PRODUCERS & STARS 

represented. Also every form of 
financial service rendered in connec- 
tion therewith — at legal rates. 



GREAT NORTHERN FINANCE CORP. 

Knickerbocker Building 

Broadway at 42nd Street, N. Y. City 
Telephone Bryant 2989 



TITLES 



NEGATIVE 
POSITIVE 
Incl. CARDS 

15 CENTS PER FOOT 

24 Hour Service if necessary 

SIMPLEX TITLE SHOP 

220 W. 42d Street Bryant 0985 



»> 



"JUST A MOTHER 

with ISABEL ELSOM 

Adapted from "Mrs. Thomson 
by the noted author, W. B. MAXWELL. 

Ask about this unusual story with 
the box office title at 

NORCA PICTURES, Inc. 1540 Broadway, N. Y. City 



POLLY 
ARCHER 

A New Face on the Screen. 
A New Personality in Pictures 
A Youthful, Charming Qirl of 
Sixteen, Radiating the Whole- 
someness of the American Home. 



"JAVA HEAD" (Paramount) 

"SOMETHING FOR NOTHING" 

(Daniel Carson Qoodman) 
"BROADWAY BROKE" 

(J. Searle Dawley) 

For Further Particulars, Address 

ROBERT EDGAR LONG 
1482 Broadway 



r - ? 




THE 



irday, January 13, 1923 




DAILV 



■ 



itkeN 



ews 



No. 5 



E PROBES INTO DEATHS OF 

GED KU KLUX VICTIMS IN 

SIANA — Investigation at Bastrop, 

xcites nation-wide interest; scenes at 

osecution. 

JES, 15 AUTOS LOST IN BRIDGE 

5TER IN WASHINGTON— Unusual 

it in Kelso, Wash., due to a stalled 

>bile. 

AND SNOW STUNTS IN THE 

i OF SNOWS — Experts give demon- 

i at Montreal for benefit of Pathe 

news from France; Warsaw, Poland. 
, Sicily, etc., etc. 
IE ONLY ONE-REEL FEATURE 



oday 

■r i < 



i 



TTTT. 



i 



Huts and Flashes 

iversal will release Gladys Wal- 
n "The Love Letter," in Feb- 



Mingo Making "Deerslayer" 
Mingo Pictures Corp. has com- 
pleted a version of Cooper's "The 
Deerslayer." 



Six Witwer Stories Finished 
F. B. O. has completed production 
of six of the H. C. Witwer stories, 
now appearing in Collier's. 



$150,000 Theater Fire 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Grand Rapids, Mich — Fire caused 
$150,000 damages to the Orpheum, 
last Sunday morning. 



Ingram's Next 
"Scaramouche," by Rafael Sabatini, 
will be Rex Ingram's next production 
for Metro. Ingram is now cutting 
and editing "Where the Pavement 
Ends." 



ry Anderson has returned to the 
Ddon Studio and is now at work 
;r next comedy. 



j? Klaffki Signs Contract 

JT (Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles— Roy H. Klaffki, for 
three years laboratory superintendent 
for Metro, has signed a contract to 
become head of the photographic de- 
partment and laboratory at Goldwyn. 



iting of "One Stolen Night," 
ng Alice Calhoun, has been 
ed at the Vitagraph Brooklyn 
j. 



ie Heme, has been added to 
Dwan's technical staff in an 
Dry capacity for "The Glimpses 
e Moon." 



Increase Stock 

Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
antic City— The Nat'l Exhibit- 
Inc. have increased their capital 
to $250,000. 



eed With Pickford Company 

Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
s Angeles — Ted Reed, former 
tor for Douglas Fairbanks, has 
added to the Pickford company 
oduction manager. 



Badger Returns to Goldwyn 

ldwyn has engaged Clarence 
er to direct "Red Lights," 
erly called "The Rear Car." 
marks Badger's return to Gold- 
after two years. 



rul Wilky Renews Contract 
Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
s Angeles — Guy Wilky, who has 
:d his 14th picture, "Grumpy," as 
raman for William de Mille, has 
d a three-year contract with Fa- 
> Players. 



Williams in "Vita" Special 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Earle Williams will 
have one of the leading roles in 
"Masters of Men," one of the new 
Vitagraph specials Wanda Hawley 
will also appear in it. 



Files Suit Against Theater Owner 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Waterbury, Conn. — L. V. Banker 
has filed suit against J. and T. Fer- 
nandez, owners of the Hamilton, to 
recover $12,000 damages. Banker 
leased the house, later finding the 
business not as good as the owners 
claimed. 



"A. B. G. Not Hit" 

(Continued from Page 1) 
and that it is a question of time only 
before the Central, Roosevelt, Monte- 
cello, Tivoli and Lincoln in Northern 
Jersey are turned over to Loew. 
Haring and Blumenthal are prime 
movers in the A. B. C. It is under- 
stood that under the franchise agree- 
ment with the A. B. C, its members 
are bound to play 12 pictures within 
the period of one year irrespective of 
to whom the theaters pass. In that 
event, the Loew interests in Jersey 
would find themselves playing what- 
ever product the A. B. C. books. 

In Brooklyn, it is understood that 
A. H. Schwartz who operates the 
Farragut, Kingsway, Linden, Rialto, 
Century and Albemarle has made 
some sort of a dicker with Loew so 
far as bookings are concerned and 
that these theaters, too, are eliminated 
from the A. B. C. roster. 



Held on Fraud Charge 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Bridgeton, N. J. — George J. Rone, 
believed to be a resident of Atlantic 
City, is being held here on a charge 
of selling stock in a corporation 
which, Rone declared, has just bought 
the screen rights to a big Broadway 
success. He realized over $12,000 
alone here, most of his alleged vic- 
tims being women. 



does competition 
Tcvurt you ? 



"Teleview" Drawing to Close 

The engagement of "Teleview," at 
the Selwyn will close on January 20, 
but will be shown at the theater again 
in March with a new program. 



Einstein Film Nearly Ready 
Garrett P. Serviss and Max Fleis- 
cher have nearly completed editing 
"The Einstein Theory of Relativity" 
which comes to the Rialto or Rivoli 
in about two weeks. This will be the 
first theater presentation. 



MacLean Buys "Going Up" Rights 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Doug MacLean has 
purchased the screen rights to "Going 
Up," taken from the original story, 
"The Aviator," by James Mont- 
gomery. Lloyd Ingraham will direct 
at the Hollywood studios, work to 
start in a week. 




competition / 



aunch Drive For Censorship 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Louis — The Sunday School As- 
tion, composed of nearly 4,500 
lay School superintendents, have 
:hed an open drive for state cen- 
iip. The Arbuckle situation gives 
'eformers a live topic of discus- 

and those well informed in poli- 
admit the situation looks grave. 



To All Exhibitors 

In New York City and Surrounding Vicinity 

YOU are cordially invited to be the guest of FILM BOOKING 
OFFICES of America, Inc. — at the World's Premiere of the won- 
derful new H. C. WITWER-COLLIER'S WEEKLY— "FIGHT- 
ING BLOOD" stories, at the Astor Theatre, Tuesday, Jan. 16th, at 
11:30 A. M., at which time you will see on the screen and in action the 
great LEACH CROSS who will oppose George O'Hara, celebrated 
Pacific Coast flash and contender for the world's light weight crown, 
and star of the great "FIGHTING BLOOD" series. No matter what 
other important matters you have arranged for Tuesday Morning, Jan. 
16th, come to the ASTOR THEATRE, B'way at 45th St. 
You'll see the greatest series ever filmed when you see the 

H. C. WITWER-COLLIER'S WEEKLY 

"FIGHTING BLOOD'' 



STORIES 

REMEMBER— 1 1.30 A.M. Tues. Jan. 16th at the 
Astor Theatre as our guest 



-»f 



FILM BOOKING OFFICES OF AMERICA, Inc. 

Main Office, F.B.O. Building, 723 7th Ave., N. Y. C. 

EXCHANGES EVERYWHERE 




THE 



— HE— 




DAILY 



Saturday, January 13, 1923 



Putting It Over 



Here is how a brother ex- 
hibitor put his show over. 
Send along your idea*. Let 
the other fellow know how you 
cleaned up. 



Life Size Cut-Outs Used 

St. Paul, Minn. — Life size cut-outs, 
made from the twenty-four sheets on 
"Silver Wings," were used for a very 
attractive lobby display by the Tower 
Theater. Three large cut figure 
heads of Mary Carr and the two sons 
in the picture were used over the 
marquee. 

The fact that Mary Carr was the 
creator of the mother role in "Over 
the Hill," was prominently displayed 
in all advertising. Large banners 
were used over the doors and also 
over the marquee. Special lobby 
frames and layouts of scenes from the 
production were also used. The ar- 
rangement of the front of the house 
made a real flash and could be seen 
by passersby from all directions. 



Wholesale Stunts f r "Omar" 

Duluth — P. F. Schwie, manager of 
the Garrick, waved his magic wand 
of exploitation and transferred it into 
a substantial box office profit. The 
picture was "Omar the Tentmaker," 
and the exploitation embodied a com- 
prehensive campaign that involved 
lobbies and retail merchants. 

An inexpensive but effective trim 
for the front was arranged by having 
a tent and awning company place a 
specially made strip of red and white 
awning around the marquee. The 
picture was tied up with Omar ciga- 
rettes, and a Superior Street cigar 
store used a window with a cutout 
of the Persian poet and a bowl of 
Omars. A haberdashery shop show- 
ed Guy Bates Post, the star, wearing 
Dunlap hats, the tieup that is being 
used throughout the country. 



Using the Italian Angle 

Freeland, Pa. — Another exploita- 
tion tale of woe comes from Clyde 
Klinger, manager of the Refowich, 
and Vernon Gray, Paramount ex- 
ploiteer, during the exploitation of 
"The Man From Home." Klinger 
says out-door advertising was "out" 
because of the persistent rowdyism 
of the "jelly-beans." They usually 
pencilled mustaches on all female 
lithograph faces and had a good time 
with "A" boards and the like. 

Window displays were also "out," 
use the book store had two shot- 
guns and a can of tobacco on display 
and no books in the ship. The music 
store didn't have a window. A 
tieup was thought about, but there 
are only two cops in town and no 
traffic. 

Finally Gray and Klinger hit on 
this idea. The town's Italian popula- 
tion is large and the picture was 
filmed in Italy. They wrote letters 
to the ministers of town presenting 
them with free passes and urging 
them to exhort the beauties of the 
Italian scenes from their pulpits. The 
Italian angle was exploited in hand- 
bills printed in the language and had 
a lot to do with the cash that rolled 
into the box-office. Gray tied up 
36 merchants for a double-truck. 



Among Exchangemen 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Dallas — W. Felton and C. M. Rus- 
sey have taken over the Belmont and 
have changed the name to Belvick. 



Albany— Vic Bendell is F. B. O. 
manager here, replacing his brother, 
Robert. 



Milwaukee — H. A. Terry is now 
connected with the local Assoc. Ex- 
hibitors' office. 



Kansas City, Mo. — F. W. Young, 
former F. B. O. manager here has 
been transferred to Des Moines. 



Chicago, 111. — Jack Barry, former 
salesman for Clyde Elliott enterprises 
is now sales manager of American 
Releasing here. 



Omaha — C. W. Taylor, formerly 
manager of the Pathe exchange in 
this city, has joined the Hodkinson 
sales force. 



Government Producing Films 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Washington — The Department of 
Agriculture has produced 53 pictures 
dealing with its work during the past 
year. 



Increase Capital 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Trenton, N. J. — The Missouri 
Theater Co., New York have filed an 
increase of capital here, of from $500,- 
000 to $1,200,000. 



Ready This Month 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
San Antonio. Tex. — Louis San- 
tiko's Palace will be opened the lat- 
ter part of this month, under the 
direction of Jos. Steele. 



New Los Angeles House 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Construction will be 
started in about 60 days on a new 
12 story theater by Turner, Dahnken 
and Langley to cost about $1,250,000 
and that will seat 3,500. 



Purchase Rights to "Romany" 

It was announced in a recent issue 
that F. B. O. bought the rights to 
"Born of the Cyclone." F. B. O. has 
purchased the rights to the play 
"Romany," by G. Marion Burton, 
which was taken from the magazine 
story, "When the Cyclone Blows," 
by Charles Stillson and Charles Bea- 
han. 



Zane Grey Sues 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Zane Grey has filed 
suit here against B. B. Hampton, E. 
F. Warner and the Zane Grey Pic- 
ture Co., Inc., alleging fraud and di- 
version of funds by the above named. 
Grey alleges nearly all of the pro- 
fits obtained from films based on his 
books have been appropriated by the 
defendants, and that he did not re- 
ceive the 25% stipulated in his con- 
tract. The accounting covers films 
based on "Desert Gold," "U. P. Trail," 
"The Mysterious Rider," "Riders of 
the Dawn," "Man of the Forest" and 
"Wildfire." 



Short 
Stuff 



The value of the short subject to 
your program. 

How to build a program through 
the use of short stuff. 

How well known exhibitors use 
short subjects to advantage. 

"Fillers" at a price vs. real short 
subjects of material value. 

"How I pick my short subjects" 
by important Broadway managers. 

The news reel and its audience 
value. 

Just a few of the ideas that will 
be presented in the forthcoming 
Short Stuff issue of THE FILM 
DAILY, out Sunday, February 19. 



An unusual "buy* for the pro- 
ducer and distributor of short sub- 
jects. 




XXIII No. 13 



Sunday, January 14, 1923 



Price 25 Cents 





PROM ONE OF THE BEST NOVELS BY- FRANCES HODGSON BURNETT 
I — . ~ ~. . „^PADI IACMMI C 



r>rv^ni \n-rir\Ki 



Associated Exhibitors 



FOREIGN REPRESENTATIVE 
SIDNEY GARRETT 



ARTHUR S KANE. PRES. 



Physical Distributors 

Pat mi Excmance 



f avtiA prabe from lke7rade Preu ^reeh a wonderful picture 

FlorenceVidor 

CONQUERING THE WOMAN 

From F<£ Fascnating Novel By HENRY C. ROWLAND 

A KINO V1D0!\ PRODUCTION 



"The picture opens with views of life 
at a seaside resort near Paris and we see 
Miss Vidor aquaplaning, swimming and 
indulging in other red-blooded sports. 
The action shifts to America and then 
quickly to the South Seas. The fights 
which David Butler puts up during the 
'shanghaiing' moments are real stuff. The 
island life is well pictured and there are 
a number of amusing situations here. 

"The chase of two ships through the 
seas is a bit of excitement. Miss Vidor 
and Mr. Butler do most of the work in 
the picture and do it well. The support- 
ing cast is adequate. The photography 
is clear and artistic, while the subtitles 
are snappy and excellently worded." 



Mot ion Picture 

News 



"The picture is so good to look at and 
made up of such a variety of interesting 
scenes that will please, that the more or 
less stereotyped plot will not detract as 
much from the feature's entertainment 
value as it might under a less careful 
production. King Vidor has secured 
numerous pleasing locations that have 
been artistically photographed and the 
atmosphere throughout is one of pictorial 
appeal. Florence Vidor's pleas- 
ing personality and ability to hold her 
audience regardless of what she has to do, 
is another redeeming feature for Henry 
C. Rowland's theme." 



IV 1 ■ 







DHIkY* 



"Florence Vidor has always been one of 
this reviewer's screen favorites. She soothes the 
eye and satisfies the intelligence. Ear rings, neg- 
ligees and exaggerated eyelids have not figured 
unduly in her success. And so it is easy to be 
entertained when Miss Vidor fills the camera eye. 
'Conquering the Woman* is entertaining, 
sprightly and well cast," 



"Florence Vidor in 'Conquering the Woman' is a good, 
entertaining feature, built along a theme that is 
familiar, but which is, at the same time, thoroughly 
pleasing in its unf oldment and picturization. David 
Butler plays the hero role and is well cast. The 
picture was directed by King Vidor from a story 
by Henry C. Rowland. Six reels. 

"This newest Florence Vidor feature should not 
fail to register pleasantly with any audience. There is a 
genuine, pleasing vein to the story which makes the pic- 
ture satisfying entertainment of a light, easy-to-follow 
variety. 

"Miss Vidor is appealing and winsome at all times 
and in selecting David Butler to play opposite her, in the 
role of the hero, Director Vidor made a particularly 
effective choice. In this story the two make a great 
combination." EXH!IMTO!§ 



IE1MID 



2&*BRADSTREET 
oSFILMDOM 




Vol. XXIII No. 13 Sunday, Jan. 14, 1923 Price 25c. 



Copyright, 1923, Wid's Film and Film Folks, Inc. 



Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., New York, N. Y., by 
WID'S FILM AND FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and 
business Manager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, at the post office at 
New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free). United States, Outside of Greater New York, 
$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, $15.00. 
Subscribers should remit with order. 

Address all communications to THE FILM DAILY, 71-/3 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y. Telephone, Vanderbilt 4551-4552 5558. 

Hollywood, California: Harvey E. Gausman, 6411 Hollywood Blvd. Phone. 

Hollywood 1603. 
Chicago Representative : Irving Mack, 808 South Wabash Ave. 
London Representative: Ernest W. Fredman, The Film Renter, 53a Shaftes- 
bury Ave., London, W 1. 
Paris Representative. Le Film, 42, Rue de Clichy. 

Central European Representative: Internationale Filmschau. Prague 
(Czechoslovakia). Wenzelsplatz 



Features Reviewed 

P. A. Powers presents THE THIRD ALARM 

Emory Johnson Prod. — Film Booking 

Offices Page 2 

Priscilla Dean in THE FLAME OF LIFE 

Universal — Jewel Page 3 

B. P. Schulberg presents THE HERO 

Preferred Pictures — Al Lichtman Page 6 

Betty Blythe in. . . THE DARLING OF THE RICH 
B. B. Prod.— State Rights Page 7 

FLAMES OF PASSION 
Independent Pictures Corp. — State Rights Page 9 

Glenn Hunter in SECOND FIDDLE 

Tuttle Waller Prod. — Hodkinson Page 12 

Eugene Roth presents 

HUNTING BIG GAME IN AFRICA 

Page 13 

Lupino Lane in A FRIENDLY HUSBAND 

Fox Page 14 

Short Reels Page 15 



News of the Week 
in Headlines 



Monday 

Dragon Films. Inc., $5,000,000 company, formed to 

develop motion pictures in China. 
John Evans resigns from Eastern Penna. M. P. T. O. 

and is succeeded by H. J. Schad. 

Tuesday 

Independent coast producers seek Thomas Woolwine, 
Los Angeles attorney, to head body similar to Hays 
movement. 

Harry Aitken and Oscar Price form Tri-Stone Pic- 
tures, Inc., to state right 2,000 Triangle reissues. 

Mary Pickford to make "P'aust." 

Famous Players-Lynch deal involves $5,700,000. Fred- 
eric Lee to be head of Southern string. 

Wednesday 

Coast producers claim Sydney Cohen expressed inter- 
est in organization movement. 

Allan Dwan to make series for Famous Players. Her- 
bert Brenon added to staff. 

Dr. A. H. Gianinni denies any connection with return 
of Valentino to screen under guidance of J. D. 
Williams. 

English exhibitor body drafts model contract which 
may have counterpart in this country. 

Thursday 

Valentino appeals to courts to alter injunction order. 
Affidavit reveals producer, believed Hearst, sought 
his services for one picture. 

First National secures Chaplin's "The Pilgrim," the 
last under the contract. 

First National not to handle Ince's "Ten Ton Love" 
because of disagreement over exhibition value. 

Sam Golchvyn to have two producing units. 

Fairbanks and Pickford after Jackie Coogan produc- 
tions. 

Friday 

AYarner Bros, close important deal with David Be- 
lasco; secure "Gold Diggers," "Deburau" and "Dad- 
dies." Belasco to supervise scripts and aid in pro- 
duction. 

Metro bids for Coogan Prod. 

Allied Authors, Inc., to release through Allied Artists. 

Saturday 
Metro signs Jackie Coogan and Buster Keaton. 
A. B. C. denies purchase of Haring-Blumenthal thea- 
ters by law effects organization. 



"Pardoning the bad is injuring the good."— Benjamin Franklin. 



THE 



CT?Ei 



>%g"£ 



DAiLV 



Sunday, January 14, 1923 



Fire Climax Offers a Thrill With a Real Wallop 



P. A. Powers presents 

"THE THIRD ALARM" 

Emory Johnson Prod. — Film Booking Offices 

DIRECTOR Emory Johnson 

AUTHOR Emilie Johnson 

SCENARIO BY Not credited 

CAMERAMAN Henry Sharp 

AS A WHOLE An almost inexhaustible supply 

of fine thrills in picture dedicated to firemen; 
sure-fire box office picture of its kind 
STORY Relies on a regulation melodrama rou- 
tine but with some new angles and very well 
handled 

DIRECTION Provides what is probably the 

best fire thrill ever filmed 

PHOTOGRAPHY Excellent 

LIGHTINGS Good 

PLAYERS Ralph Lewis the right man for hero 

role and does it splendidly ; Johnny Walker and 
Ella Hall make up the romantic end of it 

EXTERIORS All right; street scenes good 

INTERIORS Suitable 

DETAIL Careful 

CHARACTER OF STORY All about a fireman — 

good family stuff 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 6,757 feet 

Of all the melodramas of action and thrills, which 
have made their appearances within the past two 
weeks, it is quite likely that "The Third Alarm" tops 
the list with a fire climax that is probably the best 
thing of its kind ever filmed. There certainly is a 
"kick" in this last reel of Emory Johnson's produc- 
tion, dedicated to Commissioner Drennan and the 
firemen of New York. 

Last year Emory Johnson made a picture with a 
policeman as the central figure, so he probably thought, 
to even things up, it was due the firemen to make one 
dedicated to them. "The Third Alarm" is by far a 



better entertainment than Johnson's policeman pic- 
ture, not only in the material contained, but in con- 
struction and production values generally. The story 
is developed logically and smoothly and builds 
towards the climax with an accumulative interest that 
only comes of careful direction. There are many fine 
touches that include humorous bits, pathos, senti- 
ment and romance as well as the many genuine thrills 
found in the last reel. 

One particularly interesting element in the picture 
is the much discussed replacement of the fire horses. 
This is brought into the story in an interesting fashion 
and offers a really touching bit of sentiment. It isn't 
quite probable that a faithful and capable man such 
as hero Ralph Lewis, would be forced into retirement 
merely because he could not operate the new motor 
truck. He could easily have been given something 
else to do. One other slightly false touch is where 
they handcuff Lewis when he admits the theft of his 
favorite fire horse, Bullet, because he thinks his son 
guilty. They don't usually handcuff people for such 
petty offenses. But in every other respect, Johnson 
has shown very good judgment and much common 
sense. 

Of course, the big, outstanding feature of "The 
Third Alarm" is the fire. There is a real wallop in 
the thrill that this offers and the realism that has 
been injected into this sequence is decidedly unusual 
and very effective. The cave-in of the building and 
the rescue of hero's son, also a fireman, and his sweet- 
heart, are splendid. 

Ralph Lewis does excellent work as the fireman 
hero. His emotional scenes are very well done, and 
the part couldn't be given to one more capable. Lewis 
is especially adapted to this type of portrayal. Johnny 
Walker and Ella Hall do well, and others are Vir- 
ginia True Boardman, Richard Morris, Frankie Lee 
and Josephine Adair. 



A Fine Box Office Attraction That Should Glean Up 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



There is a very definite box office value in this 

picture because it supplies a new line of thrills and 

the sort of action and atmosphere that will certainly 

make it a popular number with the big majority of 

picture goers throughout the country, — the crowd 

that continually shops for the theater promising the 

most thrills. Some posters with the title prominently 
displayed should certainly attract their attention. 



There is no limit to the exploitation that you can 
put over in connection with the picture. Your local 
fire department is one sure bet if you can only 
secure its cooperation. 

Show a trailer of the fire and they'll be back. The 
title will mean more than names, but you might men- 
tion Ralph Lewis and the producer's name in case 
they remember his policeman picture, "In the Name 
of the Law." 



VHHOBHBnH 

Sunday, January 14, 1923 



THE 



~<Etl 



DAILY 



Unusual Atmosphere, Action, Thrills and a Fine Production 



Priscilla Dean in 

"THE FLAME OF LIFE" 

Jewel-Universal 

DIRECTOR Hobart Henley 

AUTHOR Frances Hodgson Burnett 

SCENARIO BY Elliott Clawson 

CAMERAMAN Virgil Miller 

AS A WHOLE Unique and picturesque enter- 
tainment that also contains thrills and action 
out of the ordinary 
STORY New atmosphere and interesting; pro- 
vides star with role that is after the order of 
what she usually does 

DIRECTION Very good; shows care and good 

judgment in every respect ; production above 
the average 

PHOTOGRAPHY Excellent 

LIGHTINGS Good 

STAR Splendid in character that she portrays 

ideally ; not an easy role by any means 

SUPPORT With Wallace Beery in it you know 

what to expect — a fine performance; Robert 
Ellis a good lead and Kathryn McGuire delight- 
ful as an old fashioned girl. A first rate cast 
throughout 

EXTERIORS Very pretty and unusual 

INTERIORS Appropriate 

DETAIL Satisfactory 

CHARACTER OF STORY A dramatic romance 

of the mining districts of northern England 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,776 feet 

Although Priscilla Dean remains the fighting, biting 
and tempestuous heroine, her role in "The Flame of 
Life" is slightly different from anything else she has 
done recently and as entertainment, Frances Hodgson 
Burnett's novel gets away from the ordinary routine 
of screen plays, not so much probably in the situations 
but in atmosphere and action incident to the plot. 



But it remained for Hobart Henley to visualize the 
quaint and picturesque atmosphere of the novel — that 
of a small mining town in northern England — and for 
his efforts in this respect, as well in production angles 
generally, Henley deserves much credit for the pleas- 
ure the feature affords. It is really a worth while 
offering and should appeal to everyone, especially 
those ever in search of something new or out of the 
ordinary, for "The Flame of Life" really is that. 
•^The plot itself probably may not be considered new, 
in a way, since it has a brutal father and an attractive 
young heroine, the object of the man's brutality. Then 
there is a good looking young hero who falls in love 
with her. But the familiarity of this triangle is very 
much obscured through the treatment accorded it in 
the story and the careful and judicious handling which 
it has received on the part of Henley. 

Besides the pleasing romantic touches the picture 
contains decidedly fine action bits, with the exception 
of some scenes showing Beery's attacks upon Miss 
Dean, as his daughter. They have been obviously 
kept within bounds but there is a little too much of 
this. The scrap between the star and one of the wo- 
men workers in the yard where, with other drudges of 
her class, the girl culls slate from coal, is a good bit and 
of course the climax, in which Beery, to get even with 
the foreman, explodes the mine, is the real wallop of 
the film. This has been excellently done and if it 
doesn't send them out thoroughly thrilled, they can't 
be satisfied. It's a real live piece of excitement. And 
for once a picture is given a sensible and logical ending. 

Priscilla Dean performs very much in her usual man- 
ner but she probably works harder in this than any- 
thing else she has done in a long while. Wallace 
Beery is always a capable villain. He doesn't fail in 
this one. The star has been given capable support 
throughout with Robert Ellis and Kathryn McGuire 
next in importance. 



Plenty For You to Talk About With T his One and Use Star's Name 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



It is a safe bet that Priscilla Dean's latest picture, 
"The Flame of Life" is going to not only please, but 
thrill, a great many picture goers. Where they like 
action and thrills you can go the limit on promises and 
you might let them know that the climax contains a 
mine explosion. In view of recent actual occurrence 
of this nature, they'll be especially interested. On the 
other hand you have a quaint and picturesque offering 



to show them and you can talk about unusual atmo- 
sphere. 

Of course many of your folks know what to expect 
of Priscilla Dean. You can promise them she is at her 
best in "The Flame of Life." Tell them it is a Hobart 
Henley production and mention his recent picture, 
"The Flirt." There is plenty for you to talk about for 
this one and it's up to you to get them in. The picture 
is really "there." 




Shadow Box Lobby Display, Papier Mache, Illumi- 
nated From Rear. 



i. 




A Problem That Con 
fronts EvervJShowman 



It Is One Thing To Get A 
Good Box-Onice Attraction 
— It Is Another Thing To 
Sell It To Your Public! 

WESLEY BARRY 










Up 




OS 







in 



Heroes of the Street 

is backed up with a line of 
advertising accessories and 
exploitation novelties that 
can't fail to impress the 
public mind with the real 
bigness of the production 
itself* 




Left and Below: Unique 
attractive co-operative 
| cut-outs in four striking 
colors, easel on back, 
size 10; x 15. Suitable 
for use as counter stands 
or in window. 



IiSSOIto 




Beautifully Colored 
Sticker. 




Classics of the Screen 



-. &W1. 



DAILV 



Sunday, January 14, 1923 



Interesting Idea Helped Along By Good Cast But Too Long 



B. P. Schulberg presents 

"THE HERO" 

Preferred Pictures — Al Lichtman Corp. 

DIRECTOR Louis J. Gasnier 

AUTHOR Gilbert Emery 

SCENARIO BY Eve Unsell 

CAMERAMAN Karl Struss 

AS A WHOLE Will be appreciated by better 

class clientele 

STORY Contained fine possibilities and some 

quite worth while situations 

DIRECTION Good; loses force in dramatic 

climaxes through long drawn out sequences 

PHOTOGRAPHY Good 

LIGHTINGS All right 

PLAYERS John Sainpolis gives the best per- 
formances with Gaston Glass next in import- 
ance; Barbara La Marr not particularly well 
cast; others Doris Pawn and Martha Mattox 

EXTERIORS Few 

INTERIORS Insufficient variation and invari- 
ably shot from same angle. 

DETAIL Overdone 

CHARACTER OF STORY War hero returns 

and "spunges" on brother until threatened death 
of child he loves spurs him to reformation 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 6,800 feet 

A year or so ago Gilbert Emery's "The Hero" served 
as a stage vehicle for Richard Bennett and was an ac- 
knowledged success with Bennett's fine ability for 
dramatic characterization evidently one good reason 
for its favorable reception. But there was also some 
very worth while material in the Emery story which is 
now serving as the latest Al Lichtman release, un- 



der the original title. The theme contains some very 
sound philosophy and will appeal to those who like 
a dramatic entertainment that really does get away 
from the commonplace. 

The plot, on the whole, is very slight and it is evident 
that it was not the easiest thing in the world to adapt 
it to the screen. The opening scenes promise a bet- 
ter picture than you really get. There are innumer- 
able receptions for the returning veterans, "The Hero," 
in particular who is feted and honored at every turn. 
But it suddenly lapses and nothing happens except the 
regular routine of the household in which the char- 
acters are congregated. 

Gasnier spends far too much time acquainting you 
with his people. That Andrew Lane is a typical lov- 
ing, kind-hearted and easy-going husband and father 
is brought home to you at least a dozen times more 
than is necessary. That he has habits that annoy his 
young wife to distraction are indicated by showing 
him picking corn plasters from his feet, bathing the 
sore spots and finally stepping out of the water and 
dragging the suds across the floor. This is just an 
indication of the manner in which Gasnier uses his 
footage on unnecessary detail. 

The episode in which Lane's young brother, a re- 
turned war hero, decides to steal the church funds 
which his brother has locked in a desk, and his sub- 
sequent scenes with Lane's wife — which get nowhere 
at all — are much too long drawn out. And the great 
fault is that the ending is obvious all the time. Cut- 
ting would be a decided benefit for the picture as an 
entertainment. In its present footage it will hardly 
hold them for the almost seven reels. Production 
values are average to good and the cast, especially 
Sainpolis, does good work. 



Will Stand a Much Better Chance If Carefully Re-Edited 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



If they can see their way to re-editing this one, it 
seems very possible that it can be made into a worth 
while attraction with a whole lot more value as enter- 
tainment than it possesses in its present form. De- 
spite the good material and some interesting ideas that 
it presents, "The Hero," will have difficulty in holding 
the average audience. The interest is not well sustain- 
ed and the fault lies chiefly with Gasnier for spending 
so much time on certain episodes which would have 
been decidedly more forceful if shorter and more to 
the point. 



Of course, there are those who may favor this form 
of suspense. The longer you hold off from the climax, 
the better they'll like it. The title offers fine exploita- 
tion and you can arouse considerable interest with 
catchlines such as: "When is a hero not a hero?" 
Or, "What is your idea of a hero? Have you ever 
thought of how many kind of heroes there are? There 
are some interesting angles on this in "The Hero," 
the latest Al Lichtman production." Of the players 
use Gaston Glass' name. Those who have seen Bar- 
bara La Marr in the recent Rex Ingram productions 
will be attracted by her name. 



THE 



Sunday, January 14, 1923 



•22H 



DAILY 



Not Very Strong Material in Betty Blythe's Latest 



Betty Blythe in 

"THE DARLING OF THE RICH" 

B. B. Productions — State Rights 

DIRECTOR John Adolfi 

AUTHOR Dorothy Farnum 

SCENARIO BY Dorothy Farnum 

CAMERAMAN Edward Paul 

AS A WHOLE Mediocre attraction done with a 

good deal of display but not very well con- 
structed 
STORY Unusual though not convincing or es- 
pecially interesting; not what they may expect 
it to be 

DIRECTION Doesn't bridge the gaps in the 

continuity satisfactorily; production values 
adequate 

PHOTOGRAPHY All right 

LIGHTINGS Good 

STAR Will please her admirers 

SUPPORT Suitable; includes Gladys Leslie, 

Montague Love, Charles Gerrard and Julia 
Swayne Gordon 

EXTERIORS Few 

INTERIORS Good 

DETAIL Fair 

CHARACTER OF STORY Girl in search of 

wealth nearly loses man she loves in effort to 
obtain riches 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 6,100 feet 

There is a rather peculiar combination of situations 
in this story by Dorothy Farnum, written for Betty 
Blythe, and while it may contain elements of appeal for 
a certain class of patrons, it is not sufficiently concise 
or interesting to make the picture anything more than 
an average offering. The plot embraces a wide variety 
of ideas which do not bear enough relation to each 
other to fit well in one story and the director has not 



been successful in covering up this fault. The plot 
does not dove-tail and the continuity is rambling. 

Whether or not the situations are plausible probably 
doesn't matter a great deal because the people to 
whom this type of picture will appeal, do not usually 
look for plausibility nor object to the lack of it. For 
them it won't matter that the richest man in New 
York is not shrewd enough to know when he is mixing 
with crooks or that he takes part in an affair in which 
a woman auctions herself off to the highest bidder. 
There isn't any real good excuse for this particular 
twist and a higher class clientele will undoubtedly 
object to such a far-fetched and unreasonable method 
of approaching a climax. 

The story's dramatic quality is considerably weak- 
ened by such false steps and then a not over judicious 
direction. Besides not always using good judgment 
in the handling of situations, Adolfi does not make the 
best use of the players. Charles Gerrard's character 
is never given a definite connection with the others 
and you never can tell whether he is working for him- 
self, the princess or the rich man. 

Betty Blythe's admirers will likely be satisfied with 
the offering and her work is quite satisfactory. She 
is given capable support by Leslie Austin, who plays 
the lead, Montague Love, as the rich man, and those 
mentioned above. 

Story : Charmion Winship's father dies leaving her 
nothing but an unsold patent. Her desire for wealth 
leads her to New York where she is hired by crooks 
to pose as a princess who is selling her jewels for relief 
money. Unknown to her the jewels are stolen goods. 
Charmion meets Lawrence, the man who once saved 
her life but must keep up the disguise. Martin, a 
rich man, and Lawrence fight for Charmion's hand 
with Lawrence finally victorious and forgiving her 
when her crook friends are disclosed in their true 
light. 



Will Please Star's Admirers and Probably the Average Audience 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



For the average crowd this may do well enough but 
it won't stand promises or unusual exploitation to make 
it a special drawing card. Regardless of some attempts 
to dress the story up with some lavish scenes, you 
couldn't honestly bill it as a lavish production and 
unless you want to disappoint the sensation seekers, 
you should not play up the title because they may 
expect something totally different from what they'll 
get. 



In case Betty Blythe is popular with your patrons, 
you can readily interest them with the announcement 
of her latest production, "The Darling of the Rich." 
If you think the theme will appeal to them, talk about 
the old question of: "Should you marry for love or 
riches? See the question answered in 'The Darling 
of the Rich.' " 



*$fa@ Sweetest I{®mamce Ever Screemed 



Here is a dieting* 
uished and remark- 
able picture with a 
cast of tremendous 
drawing power and 
direction that at 
once ranks it with 
Douglas Fairbanks'* 
"Robin Hood" and 
* When Knighthood 
Was In Flower." 



*&" ■.*-*» 



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&*« 






%\|) 



<**.V^~ 



* x*\ 



XT- 



*¥i" 



Our advice to every 
big first run theatre* 
owner is to have 
your orchestra lead- 
er with you when 
you screen "The 
Bohemian Girl." 
Your leader will 
vision at once the 
remarkable pre- 
sentation he can 
S you give this 
derful picture. 



*&% 






f Ji ><!k 



k 



SL 



m 



PRODUCTION 

r\ IN VJ I r\ L 

With this greatest of all-star casts 

IVOR NOVELLO * GLADYS COOPER * ELLEN TERRY 

CONSTANCE COLLIER * CAUBREY SMITH 



American 

RELEASING CORPORATION 



WALTER E. GREENE, haUm F. B. WARREN, fWtaUu 



THE 



Sunday, January 14, 1923 



j5B0"J 



DAILV 



Good Action and Thrills in Lumber G amp Story 



"FLAMES OF PASSION" 
Independent Pictures Corp. — State Rights 

DIRECTOR G. H. Moody 

AUTHOR George Hively 

SCENARIO BY Not credited 

CAMERAMAN J. C. Cook 

AS A WHOLE Plenty of good action in con- 
ventional lumber camp picture ; has considerable 
box office value 
STORY Along fairly familiar lines but live situ- 
ations and action make up for unoriginal theme 
DIRECTION Satisfactory; provides some genu- 
ine thrills and handles climax splendidly 

PHOTOGRAPHY Good 

LIGHTINGS All right; sometimes poor on 

interiors 

PLAYERS George Larkin, Al Ferguson and 

Frank Whitlock work hard for the action ; Karl 
Silvera and Frank Whitson allowed to overact; 
Ruth Stonehouse good and Laura Anson suit- 
able 

EXTERIORS Fine lumber camp shots 

INTERIORS Not many 

DETAIL Ample 

CHARACTER OF STORY Lumber camp em- 
ployee is forced to fight jealous associates who 
attempt to get rid of him 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 4,700 feet 

There is always an open market for this type of 
offering and with a story that provides some good live 
action, "Flames of Passion" stands a very good chance 
of becoming a satisfying box office attraction. The 
theme is more or less conventional with the situations 
embracing some familiar angles and an atmosphere 
that has been a popular element in more than one 
recent production. Lumber camp stories are coming 



into prominence with forest fire climaxes doing a big 
business in the thrill market. 

The story has been given a rather careful production 
and the direction, on the whole, is quite satisfactory. . 
G. H. Moody loses no time in getting into the action 
and after establishing a premise and acquainting the 
spectator with the locale, he proceeds to get things 
started. He tells you all you need to know without 
going into unnecessary detail and once you learn that 
hero George Larkin has an enemy in the camp, you 
can know what to expect. A near-by competitor has 
bribed the superintendent to prevent hero's company 
from getting its logs down the river in time to fulfill a 
contract. The effort of the villain to spoil the plan 
offers a thrill when he starts a log train on a runaway 
ride down the mountain in an attempt to wreck it. 
Hero's intervention is another thrill. 

Those who like fist fights for their action will have 
a good one coming to them in the battle between hero 
and villain, fought on the logs in the river. There is 
still another live fistic encounter between hero, the 
girl's father and the villain which precedes the forest 
fire climax. The latter has been very well done and is 
always thoroughly realistic. The rescue is a little 
long drawn out because it is hardly possible that any 
of those trapped in the flaming forest would survive 
as long as they do. Nevertheless there is a good thrill 
in this and it does bring the story to a fairly smashing 
climax. A bit of suspense is also found in the incident 
in which the girl is caught on a log that is headed for 
the saw. There is the usual love interest developed in 
the regulation fashion with the ultimate happy ending. 

George Larkin is particularly capable of the hero 
role and does very good work. Ruth Stonehouse 
makes an appropriate lead and the cast is adequate 
with one or two possible exceptions. The director has 
allowed some slight overacting. 



Satisfying Box Office Number For Many Theaters 



Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Because of the good action and the variety of it as 
well as the thrills and suspense, "Flames of Passion" 
will be a very suitable attraction for many houses so 
it all depends upon the desires of your clientele. If 
you know they want action and thrills and won't object 
to a slightly familiar plot, you can do a first rate busi- 
ness with this latest state rights offering. 

There is plenty for you to talk about and a trailer of 



one of the fights, a rescue stunt, or the forest fire shots, 
should easily serve to bring them back when you 
show the picture. The title may not be sufficient to 
indicate the character of story, so play it up with 
catchlines, stills, and with readers in the space accorded 
you in your local papers. George Larkin's name can 
be used and they may remember Ruth Stonehouse al- 
though she has not done very much of late. 





Jhe 


STORY 


^▼Al 


THE GREAT] 


tyAVAVAVArAVJ^A^AWAWA 




EST RELEASE "I^KXU 



OV THE YEAR 

CALEB DEM ING, a sturdy blacksmith in the little vil- 
lage of Alden, wanted a boy who would be straight and 
strong and a man among men. 

His son, Amos, however, was born a cripple, paralyzed in 
his right arm. Deming's disappointment was so great that he 
became very much embittered against his son. Amos, however, 
was endowed with a keen spiritual insight and a capacity for 
love which he exercised on all about him, particularly the chil- 
dren of the town, for whom he made toys. 

Emily Preston, the girl next door, had been ostracized by 
the villagers for the sins of her brother. The gossips made life 
unbearable for Emily, and after a fight with one of the village 
(gossips she planned to leave town. Amos sought to befriend her 
(and was repulsed several times. Amos's great spirituality, how- 
ever,. and the unselfish force of his love finally caused a change 
(of heart, and she decided to remain. Amos's father learned of 
his son's friendship for Emily and disowned him. 

In the meantime, Preston endeavored to obtain justice at 
the hands of Dodd, his former partner, the owner of a huge 
lumber camp. Dodd instructed Krieg, a powerful, unscrupu- 
lous lumberjack, to cut timber on Preston's land. Krieg bore 
a secret grudge against Dodd and endeavored to use Preston 
as a tool for gaining his revenge on Dodd. Preston, however, 
refused to have anything to do with Krieg. Krieg was caught 
spiking Dodd's timber, and realizing that Dodd had learned 
of his enmity, he killed him. Preston was accused, tried, and 
sentenced to death. 

Krieg took refuge in Emily Preston's house and forced her 
to hide him until dark, when he could escape. He was a prey 
to superstitious fears. He planned to kill Emily before leaving, 
but a demonstration, which he took to be an omen of evil, pre- 
vented bim. That night he left with the threat that if she told 
on him he would return and kill her. At the suggestion of 
Amos, she testified before the court and saved Preston, although 
she knew she was taking her life in her hands. 




S WA^ S\ VOC EL \ 

l/OJUJGM DIST RIBUTO R w-ZStr"'™ 1 

IPAMOUS PLAYERS FUM SERVICE LTD I 
X OWiUMAM PlffnUflUroRS f 



a VICTOR SCHER1 

featuring 

PAULINE STARKE 



nTTCCFI T OT'fc.jffnO/^Tk.; 



Read it and then you will under- 
stand why/ THE KINGDOM 
WITHIN promises to be 







A few nights later Krieg returned for his revenge upon 
the girl. Little Connie, an orphan whom Emily had adopted, 
ran to Amos for help. Terror-stricken, Emily barred the win- 
dows and locked the door, but Krieg burst through the window 
and entered the room. 

Emily fought desperately and managed to elude him for a 
few minutes. Relentlessly, he closed in on her, and his writhing, 
clutching fingers were about her throat when Amos entered the 
room. Amos threw himself between the girl and Krieg. A 
terrific battle ensued, but Amos was a child in the hands of 
the powerful Krieg. 

Krieg seized Amos by his paralyzed arm and twisted it. 
With a sickening blow and kick Krieg threw the boy in the 
corner and turned again to attack Emily. Nothing but a miracle 
could save her. 

Amos saw the girl he loved being strangled to death at the 
hands of the maniac Krieg, and he made a superhuman effort to 
crawl to his feet and reach him. As he struggled to his feet a 
look of joy spread over his face. He could use his right arm! 
He was no longer a helpless cripple! With both arms out- 
stretched he advanced on Krieg. Krieg, startled by Amos's cry, 
turned and beheld a strong, vigorous youth in place of the once 
frail weakling. 

It was too much for his ignorant brain to comprehend. His 
fears and superstitions overcame him and he frothed at the 
mouth like a wild beast. With a shriek of terror he ran 
frantically for the door and into the arms of the villagers, who 
had been aroused by Connie. 

As Amos stood in the doorway with the light shining out 
behind him, a hush fell upon the group gathered without, as 
they gazed on what seemed to be a veritable miracle. The tears 
came to old Caleb Deming's eyes as he gathered his son in his 
arms and begged forgiveness. The great force of Amos's love 
had brought about a change in the hearts of villagers, and 
gained for him the heart of Emily. 



GER PRODUCTION 



ATJ 



ASTON GLASS 



HODKINSON 

PICTURES 



T"X TV T 






12 



-. JZW 



DAILV 



Sunday, January 14, 1923 



Good Rural Drama That Contains Enough Action and Thrills 



Glenn Hunter in 

"SECOND FIDDLE" 

Tuttle Waller Prod.— Hodkinson 

DIRECTOR Frank Tuttle 

AUTHOR Frank Tuttle 

SCENARIO BY Frank Tuttle 

CAMERAMAN Fred Waller, Jr. 

AS A WHOLE Good rural drama that is played 

with considerable naturalness; has some fair 
thrills 

STORY Has a following and will be liked by 

this particular crowd; somewhat obvious and 
not always convincing 

DIRECTION All right; supplies effective atmos- 
phere and uses players to good advantage 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS Good 

STAR Gives an interesting performance and will 

be well liked for his work in this 

SUPPORT Mary Astor thoroughly appealing; 

Townsend Martin contributes good character 
bit and others well suited 

EXTERIORS Pretty rural shots 

INTERIORS Adequate 

DETAIL Ample 

CHARACTER OF STORY College student who 

claims honors of the family nearly spoils the 
life of his younger brother, the real hero 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,810 feet 

"Second Fiddle" contains an idea that has not been 
used extensively for screen plots so it should carry a 
good appeal for the average picture audience. And 
it has been rather capably handled by Frank Tuttle 
who is also responsible for the story. He has supplied 
a coherent and smooth continuity and tells the story 
in a straightforward fashion and usually reaches con- 
clusions without wasting too much footage in doing so. 



Production values are up to standard and the injection 
of proper rural atmosphere makes the feature attractive 
from a pictorial standpoint. 

The plot is rather after the style of a serial with the 
villain pursued in each episode, being captured and 
escaping again in the next. Through this method of 
development Tuttle succeeds in sustaining the interest 
very well and those who go in for thrills of a serial 
order will find some to their liking in "Second Fiddle." 
There is the attack of the villain upon his daughter, 
his capture by hero and later his escape from jail and 
another attack upon hero's sweetheart with the even- 
tual rescue in which hero comes into the honor due 
him. All these bits are played with the sort of stress 
peculiar to this type of drama. There are close-ups 
of villain approaching his victim and the usual touches 
that help to supply the thrills. 

Things are not always convincing, such, for instance, 
as the bit in which hero explains his inability to hold 
the villain because the gun was not loaded. The 
willingness of the father to immediately brand his son 
a liar is not a convincing twist but, of course, it serves 
as a stepping stone to still greater honor for hero 
when he finally clears himself and is acknowledged as 
the true hero of the family. 

Glenn Hunter does very good work in the picture, 
and Mary Astor, who will be remembered for her 
appearance in the two reel Triart productions of last 
year, is very pretty and appealing. Others in the cast 
are capable. They are William Nally, Leslie Stowe, 
Mary Foy. 

Story : Herb Bradley hands his brother Jim an un- 
loaded revolver to hold off the desperate Cragg who 
has killed his daughter. How Herb makes it appear 
that Jim was a coward and events so shape themselves 
as to cause Jim to believe that he has lost the love of 
his sweetheart, Polly, is followed by Polly's rescue by 
Jim and the latter's capture of Cragg. 



Has Elements That Will Appeal To a Good Majority 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



If you know your folks like the type of dramatic 
entertainment that "Second Fiddle" offers you can be 
quite sure they'll go out satisfied because it contains 
effective thrills, enough action, a first rate atmosphere 
and a cast that does very good work. In case you 
played Glenn Hunter in "The Cradle Buster" some- 
time ago, you might recall that and tell them he is 
the star of '"Second Fiddle." 



The title is a good one and suggests plenty of ex- 
ploitation angles and stunt advertising that should 
easily attract the attention of your patrons. Mary 
Astor is a pretty heroine whose photo will attract 
attention in the lobby. They may remember her from 
her Triart pictures, such as "The Beggar Maid." 
Catchlines will give an adequate idea of the story if 
you want to let them know what it is about. 



THE 



Sunday, January 14, 1923 




13 



Thrilling and Realistic Record of Wild Animals at Home 



Eugene H. Roth presents 
"HUNTING BIG GAME IN AFRICA" 

DIRECTOR H. A. Snow 

AUTHOR Real narrative 

SCENARIO BY The same 

CAMERAMAN Sidney Snow 

AS A WHOLE Unusually absorbing and inter- 
esting pictures of Africa's wild beasts taken in 
their native haunts 

STORY Photographic record of trip into un- 

traversed places of Africa 
DIRECTION A particularly well composed nar- 
rative picture, probably the best of the kind 
yet made 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS Natural 

PLAYERS Natives, beasts and explorers 

EXTERIORS Mighty interesting 

INTERIORS None 

DETAIL Splendid descriptive sub-titles 

CHARACTER OF STORY A trip through 

densest Africa 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 10,000 feet 

This latest photographic record of an African ex- 
ploring expedition is probably the most authentic and 
realistic that has ever been obtained. The Snow 
African expedition was organized by the African Ex- 
pedition of Oakland, California, and left San Francisco 
in 1919, returning early in 1922, after a trip around 
the world, totaling 80,000 miles. Before going into 
detail it might be well to make a note of some inter- 
esting facts connected with the taking of these un- 
usual pictures. In Africa alone the expedition travel- 
ed 60,000 miles, exposed 125,000 feet of negative film 
and made more than 4,000 still pictures. All photo- 
graphic developing was carried on at night, the tem- 
perature of the daj- being tense enough to melt the 



film the minute it touched the water. The tour was 
conducted by H. A. Snow and his son, Sidney Snow, 
cameraman. 

The picture offers the most interesting and spec la 
cular views of wild animal life, with the creatures 
cornered and photographed in their native lair, very 
often through the use of the telescopic lense which 
permits of more intimate views, close-ups in particular. 
Besides the actual scenes of the animal herds consist- 
ing of every variety that you have ever heard of, and 
twice as many that you never heard of, the expedition 
pictures contain many delightful views of the African 
country. There are also glimpses into the tribal life 
as found in the camps along the line of travel. 

Early in the picture there is a sequence which 
(litters slightly from the rest of the offering, but it is 
decidedly a very interesting feature of "Hunting Big 
Game in Africa." Incidentally it will probably till 
the average audience more than it ever dreamed about 
in connection with the precious diamond. The views 
ot the mine and the conditions under which the natives 
work are intensely interesting as is the process through 
which the stones go prior to their actual appearance. 
The sub-titles in this, as well as throughout the picture, 
give very interesting data. 

The introduction of the "flivver" into big game 
hunting is another new angle and the fight between 
the wart hog and the Ford offers a humorous touch 
as do the matrimonial customs of the native tribes, 
the pictures of which tend to indicate where the mod- 
ern dance ideas originated. There are numerous 
thrilling shots of animal captures such as the whaling 
scenes, the lion hunt, the charge of the rhino into the 
face of the camera, and the capture of the elephants. 
There are many other equally thrilling bits — too many 
to record in detail here. The picture is a very fine 
entertainment of its kind. 



Very Worth While Possibilities in This Exploration Novelty 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



There is a very definite attraction in "Hunting Big 
Game in Africa." It is essentially a novelty but also 
extremely valuable as an educational subject. A 
mighty large percentage of your folks will never get 
any nearer to Africa than they are to your theater and 
tnis is one very good reason for their seeing the pic- 
ture. Appeal especially to those interested in zoo- 
logical subjects but the film will also appeal to every- 
i.i e who likes an entertainment of an unusual char- 



acter. And they certainly get that in "Hunting Big 
Game in Africa." 

Present facts in connection with the expedition and 
get your folks interested well in advance. There is 
plenty of material for you to work with as far as ex- 
ploitation is concerned and you might recall the Paul 
Rainey expedition of a few years ago with promises 
of newer and better pictures in this H. A. Snow ex- 
pedition. 



THE 



14 



J^2 



DAILV 



Sunday, January 14, 1923 



A Fairly Successful Attempt At a Slap -Stick Comedy of Feature Length 



Lupino Lane in 

"A FRIENDLY HUSBAND" 

Fox 

DIRECTOR Jack Blystone 

AUTHOR Jack Blystone 

SCENARIO BY Jack Blystone 

CAMERAMAN Jay Turner 

AS A WHOLE A slap-stick comedy in five reels 

that holds the interest and contains more laughs 
than you might imagine 

STORY A fairly well connected plot with some 

new gags and some of the old ones well done 

DIRECTION Makes a good attempt considering 

the proposition ; registers some worth while 
humor 

PHOTOGRAPHY All right 

LIGHTINGS Nearly all exteriors 

STAR Will surely amuse those who like riotous 

comedy 

SUPPORT Adequate; no one well known 

EXTERIORS Suitable 

INTERIORS Few 

DETAIL Ralph Spence's titles more subdued 

than usual 
CHARACTER OF STORY Based on the fami- 
liar mother-in-law angle with the husband final- 
ly asserting his rights 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 4,527 feet 

The director had more than an ordinary task on his 
hands when it came to making "A Friendly Husband" 
because it isn't a very simple matter to make a five 
reel slap-stick comedy and get it over. But, on the 
whole, this Lupino Lane feature comedy does offer a 
pretty good humorous entertainment and for those 
who like this type of comedy, "A Friendly Husband" 
will probably send them into roars of laughter at 
frequent intervals. 



There is fairly conservative plot that is one reason 
for a nicely sustained interest. Of course the usual 
humorous incident is used to a large extent to round 
out the situation and gather in the laughs. These are 
of a more or less familiar order and although many of 
the stunts have been used before there are also some 
first rate new gags and the old ones have been done 
over with some new touches. The idea of the mechan- 
ical contrivance operating on push buttons has been 
used in various forms but its association with a camp- 
ing outfit is undoubtedly new. Folks will get a good 
laugh out of the camp wagon which Lane attaches to 
his Ford and brings home as a surprise for "wifie." 
The mother-in-law angle is quite old stuff but it isn't 
greatly overdone. 

Lupino Lane works hard to put the picture over 
and the many admirers of slap-stick comedians will 
surely enjoy his stunts in this. His athletic ability is 
also given good opportunity for display. The director 
has made the mistake of repeating the gags as is so 
often the case in this sort of a picture. Lane's attempt 
to get the Ford into the garage and the continual clos- 
ing of the doors as he is about to drive in is very much 
overdone as is the incident of the suitcase when 
Lane tries to pack his "duds" in preparation for the 
vacation. 

They get quite a good deal of fun out of the camping 
sequence in which Lane plays porter for the wife's 
family. The bit where Lane goes hunting and the 
squirrel he's aiming at is calmly sitting on his hat, 
offers a good laugh. The "cute" little animal that gets 
into the leg of Lane's trousers is sufficient to knock 
the family over when he gets back to camp. They 
never fail to bring in this gag showing the comedian 
wriggling around with some moveable object causing 
him great distress. But the audience usually gets a 
laugh out of it so it's evidently all right. 



Has Enough Laughs To Make It Satisfy If They Want This Type Of Comedy 



Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Many exhibitors cater to a crowd that can never get 
too much of slap-stick comedy. For them "A Friendly 
Husband" will surely go big. They'll have a lot of fun 
at the showing. In case you have been playing the 
recent Lupino Lane two reel comedies and they have 
liked them, you can count on satisfying them with 
Lane's first feature comedy. 



You might make it plain that it is a feature and it 
would probably be easy to get them interested if you 
could secure a trailer showing the unique camping 
outfit. They'll want to know more about it. The 
title isn't enough to let them know what sort of a 
picture this is so play it up with catchlines and display 
plenty of stills in the lobby unless you know they are 
familiar with the star and know what to expect. 



Short Stuff 



"Border Law" — Range Rider — Pathe 

Type of production 2 reel western 

Texas Rangers and friendly Mexican Rurales cooperate in 
"Border Law" to round-up a trio of gun runners. Maloney 
is the bashful lover of the Ranger Captain's daughter. A sup- 
posed artist seeks lodging at the Captain's house and the girl, 
seeing in him her opportunity to make Maloney propose, takes 
him as a boarder. This gives the artist, really the chief of 
the gun runners, a chance to obtain needed information. The 
bashful lover, however, learns the true situation, and after 
a good chase through the mountains in which the girl is 
kidnapped and rescued, and the gun runners captured, he 
overcomes his bashfulness enough to make the desired offer. 
Pauline Curley is the girl and the cast includes Pedro Valen- 
zuela, Tommy Grimes and Bud Osborne. 



"No Luck" — Hamilton — Educational 

Type of production 2 reel comedy 

There is some very funny stuff in Lloyd Hamilton's latest. 
The ladylike comedian is first seen trying his luck as a fish- 
erman. The fish bite everything imaginable but the bait, 
finally jumping inside his shirt and biting him. Slow motion 
photography is introduced with exceedingly funny effect when 
the sweet boy is induced to smoke one of the girl's father's 
cigars and he floats away on the wings of tobacco. Several 
other good gags are introduced when he attends a society 
function in opera hat and rubber gloves that stick to his hands 
in spite of his efforts to free himself. The subject is well 
made and the laughs frequent. 



"A Fool For Luck"— Universal 

Type of production 1 reel comedy 

The old stand-by, "April Fools Day" is used as the basis 
of this one reeler, directed by Scott Darling and starring 
Lewis Sargent, the champ messenger of the Western Union. 
While not hilarious, the fun is wholesome and Sargent's 
followers will be well pleased. Sargent is determined not to 
be fooled but the harder he tries the more luck is against him. 
On the way to the office he sees a pocketbook with a string on 
it. But they can't fool him. He hides in a doorway and 
sees another messenger come along and pick up the bag just as 
the owner whose knitting is on the other end of the string 
comes up and gives the finder a reward. 



Screen Snapshots No. 17 — Pathe 

Type of production 1 reel fan magazine 

Among the picture favorites caught at an actor's fund benefit 
are Mary Miles Minter, William Farnum, William Russell, 
Viola Dana, Enid Bennett, Conrad Nagel, Bebe Daniels and 
many others. Lillian and Dorothy Gish bid each other good- 
by as Lillian sails for Europe. Wesley Barry and Marie 
Prevost have some fun in the studio. A very funny shot shows 
Ben Turpin and Charlie Murray at typewriters writing a world- 
beating scenario. 



"Casey Jones, Jr."— Jack White— Educational 

Type of production 2 reel comedy 

Released under the brand name of "Mermaid," this is one 
of the best comedies that Lige Conley has appeared in in 
some time. Directed by Del Lord, it is a railroad story that 
combines laughs with some good stunts. As assistant to 
the president of the railroad, Casey Jones, Jr., is sent to 
speed up The Speed-Ball, Celeryville's month late train. All 
is going reasonably well when Mexican Pete and his bandits 
board the train and steal the safe. A good effect is used 
here when the colored porter's eye-balls begin to swell from 
fright, finally becoming small balloons. Casey rides a bfcycle 
over the roofs of the moving train and captures the bandits 
and the money. The cast includes Peg O'Neill, Violet Oliver, 
Jack Lloyd and Spencer Bell. 



"Sting 'Em Sweet" — Century — Universal 

Type of production 2 reel comedy 

Brownie, the dog, and little Jack Morgan are the chief fun- 
makers in this one, written and directed by Raymaker. The 
opening shots showing Brownie giving Jack a shampoo are 
very "cute." Sister has two beaus and Jackie has a lovely 
time playing tricks on both of them. He sifts pepper on one's 
boquet of flowers, and then buys a box of bees which he pre- 
sents to the company. The rest of the action consists of a 
grand scramble to avoid being stung. 



Pathe Review No. 3 

Type of production 1 reel magazine 

This is a particularly interesting issue, containing material 
of varied subjects. Opening with some "living paintings," 
which are followed by street scenes in India, the New York 
Aquarium is visited and some queer fish filmed. These are 
seen to have almost human faces particularly the "boob faced" 
trigger fish, who try to swallow a black spot on the outside 
of the tank. Following this is a very cute cartoon subject 
in silhouette, after the manner of Tony Sarg, which under 
the title of "The Merrie Huntsman," depicts the adventures 
of a hunter in his efforts to capture several playful animals. 



"Be Yourself"— Christie — Educational 

Type of production 2 reel comedy 

Two reels of very good entertainment are to be found in 
this Christie comedy, which Neal Burns and Charlotte Mer- 
riam help materially to put over, aided by a large cast. Par- 
ticular mention should be given Babe London who, as the fat 
little factory girl, has quite a few laughs to her credit. Neal 
is the happy-go-lucky son of a manufacturer who puts him 
to work in the factory to bring him down to earth. He be- 
comes the champion of the factory girls and they strike for a 
raise. After many complications he presents his new sw-et- 
heart to his dad, only to find that she has been put to work 
so that he would fall in love with her. The comedy has been 
directed by Al Christie from a story by Robert Hall. 



Short Stuff 



"Prickly Conscience" — Bruce — Educational 

Type of production 1 reel scenic novelty 

This one of the Bruce Wilderness Tales uses the flight of 
a young tramp who thinks he is pursued to bring out the 
beauties of the country through which he travels. There 
are several shots of exceeding beauty, and the photography 
throughout is splendid. The young man finally returns to his 
home town only to find that he is not being sought at all. 



"Royal Chinook"— Kiser— Pathe 

Type of production 1 reel industrial 

This is another of the Oregon Trail Series made by Kiser 
showing the industries of the Northwest and it depicts the 
life-history of Columbia River salmon in clear and interesting 
fashion. The photography is good and the picture will un- 
doubtedly interest. The manner in which the salmon are 
caught for canning as well as the way in which the young are 
conserved is shown in detail. A good short reel. 



m 



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m 



"The Friendly Circle" 



I 



Where the Promise 
is Performed 



The 



Barnes Printing Company 

INC. 

229 West 28th Street Phone Watkins 1416-11 



m 



JIllllilllHlllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllill^ 



Short Stuff 



The value of the short subject to 
your program. 

How to build a program through the 
uselof short stuff. 

is 

How well known exhibitors use short 
subjects to advantage. 

"Fillers" at a price vs. real short sub- 
jects of material value. 

"How I pick my short subjects" by 
important Broadway managers. 

The news reel and its audience value. 

Just a few of the ideas that will be 
presented in the forthcoming Short Stuff 
issue of THE FILM DAILY, out Sunday, 
February 19. 



An unusual "buy" for the producer and dis- 
tributor of short subjects. 



t ne title 
the song, 
j to be the 
, the Criterion, 
.loses there. 



Pafhepicture 




Produced by 

Robert J. Flaherty, F.R.G.S. 



Are you fishing for an attraction? 
Here's one that's real — the 

REVILLON FRERES production 



Nanook of the North 



Read the exhibitors' comments below. Pathe has 
had hundreds just like them! 



"We put over 'Nanook' wonderfully. I actually believe this 
product made more honest-to-God friends for the Belasco 
than amy Jififlture. I ever bought. It's a great and wonderful 
entertainment."^Jt / (7/ H. Sohm, Belasco Theatre, Quincy, 
III. 

"Wonderful. Greatest picture in last 6 months. Big bus- 
iness." — H. W. Peery, Ogden Theatre, Ogden, Utah, (quoted 
in Ex. Herald). 

"Most unique picture we ever played, making a host of 
friends and more than satisfactory from a box-office stand- 
point." — /. H. Ruben, Ruben-Finkelstein Circuit, Minn. 

"Here is a real special. Record business. Everyone pleased." 
v red Jones, Rialto Theatre, Nelson, Neb. 

-eptional picture The offering gave better satisfac- 

an any we have shown in some time." — Jack Hartigan, 
°aynesvillc, Minn. 



"Broke record in Bakersfield in 4 days showing. Did the 
same thing in Pomona." — Harry C. Arthur, General Man' 
agar, West Coist Theatres, Los Angeles. 
"Most interesting and educational picture we have ever 
shown. Pleased patrons 100 per cent. It's wonderful." — 
/. L. Scdlak, Bee Bee, Neb. 

"Standing room was at a premium for the two days showing 
and 'Nanook' was the talk of the town. We heard more 
favorable comments on it than any picture we have ever 
shown. It was the most natural and life-like entertainment 
we have ever seen."- — John H. Raven, Colonial Theatre 
Co., Mich. 

MANY EXHIBITORS ARE GETTING REPEAT BOOK- 
INGS. ANY EXHIBITOR WHO DOESN'T PLAY THIS 
PICTURE IS PASSING UP THE SENSATION OF THE 
YEAR. 



lTHE 

tie BRADSTREET 
>/ FILMDOM 





ZfoRECOCNIZES 

Authority 




,1. XXIII No. 14 



Monday, January 15, 1923 



Price 5 Cents 



"Loyalties" Sold 

sworthy Play Goes to Graham- 
Wilcox Prod., Who Also Buy 
"Chu Chin Chow" 

pecial Cable to THE FILM DAILY) 

, ondon — Graham-Wilcox Prod. 
e purchased the picture rights to 
n Galsworthy's "Loyalties" and 
i to "Chu Chin Chow." The com- 
y intends making both subjects 
a big scale. Charles Wilcox will 

for America on the 20th. 
'he trade here is of the opinion 
t "Loyalties" and "Chu Chin 
>w" will stand out as two of the 
5t noteworthy British pictures of 

year. 



Iraham-Wilcox Prod, was recently 
ned with the express purpose of 
cing pictures with a world-wide 
•ket. Its first two are "Flames of 
sion," with Mae Marsh, and "The 
nderful Thing." 

tactically every important pro- 
ing company in New York had 
:red bids for "Loyalties," which 
>ne of the season's theatrical suc- 
;es. 



Giblyn Returns from Europe 

harles Giblyn has returned from 
land where he directed "The 
30crites" for the Hollandia Film. 



Special Edition of "Salome" 

. film edition of "Salome" has 
been printed. It is selling in the 
)y of the Criterion, as well as in 
ous book stores. 



Big Theater for Brooklyn 
[. W. Del Gaudio, an architect, 

draw plans for a $500,000 theater 
3e built on 86th St., between 4th 

5th Aves., Brooklyn. The house 

seat 2,500. 



Censor Bill in Indiana 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
ndianapolis — Senator Knox has 
oduced a censorship bill. It is 
erstood that the revival of the 
uckle question is the reason for it. 



omplete Cast for "Main Street" 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
os^Angeles— The cast for "Main 
■et" will include Florence Vidor, 
ite Blue, Noah Beery, Robert 
don, Harry Myers and Louise 
enda. Harry Beaumont will 
ct. 




''Second Fiddle' has heart interest, thrilling suspense and Glenn Hunter 
in a most appealing role. It is a superior attraction that promises satis- 
faction at the box office," says Moving Picture World, of this excellent 
Film Guild production for Hodkinson Release. — Advt. 



Protection 

Something to think about. Big operators of large chains; 
first run and others want it. Some getting it. Jensen & Von 
Herberg reported to be getting four months from some distribu- 
tors. Ruben & Finklestein reported wanting six months. Others 
hive been after it. Say they can't operate without it. That 
they pay the bulk of the money for big pictures. And the 
neighborhood houses clean up. Because those houses don't be- 
; in to pay what the first runs do ; and the folks won't come down 
town, preferring to pay the lower prices in their home theater. 

All of which may be true. And there isn't any doubt that 
c'ifficulties exist. But you can't run the picture business for first 
run houses alone. It just can't be done. First runs give a 
quick clean up and ready money in big gobs to a distributor. 
But except in unusual cases what production can live on first 
runs alone? The very Lig unusual ones — yes. The rest. No. 
And emphatically no. 

What of exploitation; what of advertising; what of national 
advertising? Is any one insane enough to figure that this 
produces first run business alone? Forget it. If there is any 
sense in national advertising it is to awaken interest in home 
folk for their neighborhood houses. And what would happen if 
this "protection" was extended to six months generally? Who 
would remember the pictures that came out six months back? 
Who can remember those that came out last August? . Try and 
do it — and get a headache. " _ ^_ 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Universal's Theater 

Planning Big Broadway House With 

Large Office Building— Several 

Sites Considered 

Important officials of Universal 
are planning the erection of a 3500 
seat theater in the heart of Broadway, 
with an office building in conjunction 
therewith, a portion of which will 
be used as the future home for Uni- 
versal's executive offices. 

Several sites are understood to be 
under consideration. The amount in- 
volved for a theater structure and 
office building in what is known as 
the theatrical section of Broadway, 
would run into several millions, 
minimum. 

Executives at Universal refuse to 
discuss the report. 



On the Shelf 

Famous Decides to Write Off the 

Three Arbuckle Features — Never 

to Be Released 

It is understood that at the last 
directors meeting of Famous Players, 
that it was decided to shelve the three 
Arbuckle features owned by the cor- 
poration, and to write off as a com- 
plete loss the amount involved; up- 
wards of over half a million. 



Coast reports are to the effect that 
Arbuckle has started work directing 
two reelers. It is anticipated that 
he will continue directing but will 
not — at least for a leng time — appear 
personally in comedies. It is a ques- 
tion whether his name will appear as 
"director" of the comedies. 



Vote Against Arbuckle 

The National Committee for Better 
Films, an affiliation of the National 
Board of Review, has decided against 
favoring in any way further exhibi- 
tion of Arbuckle pictures. 



Women Condemn Arbuckle 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Washington — The governing board 
of the National Federation of 
Women's Clubs has unanimously 
voiced opposition to the return to the 
screen of Roscoe Arbuckle. 



Changes Name to Resolute 

The Dependable Film Sales, Inc., 
has changed its name to the Resolute 
Film Sales, Inc. Charles R. Rogers 
is president. 

"Eli Eli at Criterion 

"Breaking Home Ties," the title 
of a picture based on the song, 
"Eli Eli," is understood to be the 
next feature going into the Criterion, 
this after "Salome" closes there. 



THE 



■22H 



DAILY 



Monday, January IS, 1923 




r RUKTKCT \^*m WOTl^ JfcBHOOT/O 
'FaXJOM^ Pi*' 1 ^AUTHOOfTY 

Vtl. Xfflll No. 14 Monday, Jan. 15, 1923 Price 5 Cents 

Copyright 1923, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 
. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00 ; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman. 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 
Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Are., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau, Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
vakia), Wenzelsplatz. 

Quotations 

Hi«k Low Cloae Sale* 

East. Kod. 97 96 96 600 

F. P.-L. .. 89}* 88^ 89Ji 1,000 

do pfd. .99 98J4 99 300 

Goldwyn . 6 l A 6% 6]/ t 108 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's ... 19H 19 19 2,500 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 

Form Partnership 

James Geller, has severed his con- 
nection with the Fox to establish an 
advertising and publicity agency with 
Edward Frohlich. 







Bryant 5741 

CHARLES WALTON 

Personal Representative 

Serving the Best in Motion Pictures 

Producers, Directors 

Motion Picture Service 

245 West 47th St. N. Y. C. 



International Distributer's of: 
MOTION -PICTURES 



Inter-Ocean Film Corporation 1' "~ ■■ : - 



INTER-OCEAN B UILEtfNp 

218 WEST 42nd ST;',**' - NfcW H^lCf 

BRYA.NT 7812 "'• / 

WHEN YOU THINK 'd'F-r 
FOREIGN ' THINK-" U%.) 

INTER-aC;EH 



Protection 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Incidentally, what would happen if this "protection" idea 
spread ? What do you think would happen among the second 
run and neighborhood operators? Will they be expected to sit 
back and laugh ? Maybe. But more likely you will find them 
organizing combinations to offset the moves. And the most 
logical of all happenings subsequently would be booking combi- 
nations. And what a nice, messy sort of thing that would be? 

Gentlemen, once again — what are you going to do about it? 

OODLES OF MONEY 

Scads of it. Warner's bite off a quarter million for David 
Belasco. And Marcus Loew telegraphs a half million to Jackie 
Coogan. 

Let's see ; was somebody saying something about "hard 
times!" 

Where are they? 

CRANDALL'S WISDOM 

Speaking of "hard times" had a fine chat with Harry Cran- 
dall. Know Harry? Has the distinction of having been hit 
harder during 1922 than any exhibitor in the world. When the 
Knickerbocker collapsed — and there was a tremendous calamity 
— most of his houses were closed about seven weeks. And for 
a time afterwards you couldn't expect much business for him. 
But he stuck to the job. Got a few more grey hairs. A few 
more lines about his eyes. And what's the result? 

Today Harry Crandall is one of the real optimists in the 
business. Pulled thjrougfh. But still a-going. And he says 
this : "Every time you tell an exhibitor things aren't so good 
what happens? He leans back and says, 'well, the other fellow 
is having the same trouble I have.' But if you tell him you're 
doing fine, and business is good if he isn't getting what he 
should he'll plug in and work and find out why. So the answer 
is — don't ever tell them business isn't good. It isn't good busi- 
ness. Few exhibitors work as hard as they should." 

Golly, Harry, but you said a lot. 

R. H. AND BABY PEGGY 

Cochran. Universal. Has a hobby — Baby Peggy, the di- 
minuitive star of one of their comedy companies. Regular little 
vamp. Sure has vamped Cochran. Every time they get a print 
in. Out it goes to New Rochelle. And all the friends of the 
family are called in. To see how Baby Peggy does it. And R. 
H. stops thinking about his new house. And all other things. 

It's great to have a hobby of a six year old star. 

WATCH THIS ONE 

Ethel Shannon. Little girl. Regular trouper. In Gasnier's 
"The Hero." Worth watching. Looks like a comer. 

JUST A SUGGESTION 

When the late lamented Frank Bacon was alive a lot of offers 
reached John Golden to picturize "Lightnin'." With Bacon in 
his famous role. Deaf ears. Nothing happened. Then Frank 
Bacon was called home. And as picture material "Lightnin' " is 
now worth about eight cents on the dollar. Or less. 

Which suggests this : why not have David Warfield make 
"The Music Master." Or one of his other big successes right 
now. When to be released is another story. Quite another 
story. And so with other big stage successes. So that the 
future will not be robbed. 

JACKIE'S INCOME 

Jackie's pictures get a lot of money. And Jackie's father is 
trusteeing Jackie's share. But Jackie earns a bit more. Every 
time he offers a suggestion the company can use he gets 50 cents. 
When they were making "Oliver Twist" he earned $50 this way. 
And this is his own money and he can do with it as he pleases. 

Incidentally how many people know that Jackie's father 
formerly had an act in vaudeville? 

(Continued on page 3) 



"Chi" Operators Talk Strike 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Chicago — The annual threatened 
strike of operators looms again with 
the statement of Thomas J. Reynolds, 
president that the operators would 
not accept the 25% wage reduction 
proposed by the theater owners' asso- 
ciation. The wage scale for opera- 
tors in de luxe theaters is $80 a week. 
In other theaters the scale is govern- 
ed by seating capacity. 



4Jjhutnrc (Em-pirrattnu 

RESOURCES - $5,000,000 

CHARLES O. BAUMANN. Pres, 

Knickerbocker Building 
Broadway at 42nd Street, N. Y. City 



dxaitmoney? 

4e 



will make -pa 
happy ol#*rf# 





Mr. Exhibitor: 
Ask Your Film Company for the 

"THEMATIC MUSIC CUE SHEET 



(Pat. Applied For) 
It means more to you than ar, 
other accessory. It is the cue she< 
that insures a musically perfci 
Dicture presentation. 



THE 



Monday, January 15, 1923 




Protection 



Lots of fun. 
Uses a micra- 



Clem Deneker 



(Continued from Page 2) 

"ROXY'S" PARTY 

Green Room Club last night. Nice affair, 
ncidentally "Roxy" has a new idea on rehearsals, 
ihone to give directions. Don't have to yell. 

CLEM COMING 

Don't miss Thursday's lunch of the AMPA. 
>f Pneumonia, Nevada, has promised to talk. If Clem talks as 
/ell as he writes. Boy; what a party? 

GETTING IN THE BUSINESS 
Bill True. Bill Burford. Harry Davis. All of the Ex- 
tibitors Distributing Corp. Actually got in the business last 
veek. Lunched over at Delmonico's. Like all the other big 

ellowS " A WALLOP 

Regular one. In Elmer Clifton's "Down to the Sea in 
ihips" — say; why will they stick these long titles on? There 
jn't one theater front out of 50 that can handle such a title 
dequately. But there's a wallop in it. Big whale overturns 
. small boat. Loaded with sailors. Real stuff. Way out in 
he ocean. No phoney tank stuff. And sharks sailing all around. 
5oy; this acting business may be all right. But Raymond 
/IcKee won't make another whaling picture for some time. He 
:ad enough with this one. Just need a good 24 sheet; and a 
ot of prints and trailers. Of that whale stunt. To get this one 
ver right. 

THEM PRESS AGENTS 

Carl Laemmle says he isn't going to make many pictures 
hat cost over $100,000. But the publicity boys send out a 
lice yarn. That "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" will cost a 
lillion. 

Atta boy's. 



Releases Switched 

Al Lichtman will release "Poor 
Men's Wives" next instead of "Are 
You a Failure?" The latter picture 
will be available in March. Before 
leaving the coast for New York, Gas- 
nier practically finished the editing of 
"Poor Men's Wives." 



American Legion Get Historic Film 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Indianapolis — The Film Service Di- 
vision of the American Legion has ac- 
quired from S. H. Boynton, of Chi- 
cago, all rights to "The Man Without 
a Country." 



Lautem Not Pathe Salesman 
According to Lewis Innerarity of 
Pathe, a man named Charles Lautem 
is representing himself in the Mary- 
land and Virginia territory as a Pathe 
salesman, and is offering Pathe re- 
leases at low rentals. Innerarity 
states there is no such salesman in 
the employ of the company. 



Guts and Flashes 

Harley Knoles is the papa of an 
eight-pound baby. 



Nazimova's play, "Dagmar." will 
open at the Selwyn, Jan. 22. 



Fox's "The Town That Forgot 
God," will be released Feb. 11th. 



Mary Carr has been elected a hon- 
orary member of the A. M. P. A. 



A complete fire-proof projection 
room has been installed in the main 
ballroom of the Hotel Astor. 



S. L. Rothafel has been made an 
honorary member of the American 
Federation of Musicians, Local No. 
802. 



"Mighty Lak' a Rose" has been 
definitely decided on as the title for 
the picture Edwin Carewe has 
finished for First National. 



SKELETON RATTLING 

And Jack Meador turns the limelight on the skeletons. And 
sends out a pretty yarn about Frankie Bailey's legs. There are 
only three of us who remember her when she was with Weber 
& Fields. Joe Plunkett included. Wonder if we'll see what's 
left of them? In "The Famous Mrs. Fair." Oh, by the way, 
there's another oldtimer in the cast — Lydia Yeamans Titus. 

GIRLS, A TREAT IS COMING 

They say over at Inspiration that Dick Barthelmess will 
knock Valentino dead when the girls see Barthelmess as the 
handsome Latin in "The Bright Shawl" all dressed up 'n every- 
thing. DANNY. 



THE SUPER 39 



"THE GLIMPSES OF THE MOON" 

with Bebe Daniels and Nita Naldi 
AN ALLAN DWAN PRODUCTION 

Adapted by Edfrid Bingham and Lloyd Sheldon from the novel by 

Edith Wharton 

Released March 25th 



No. 13 



No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 



A DELUXE production of a world's best 
seller. This book has been at the 
top of the book-sellers' lists ever since it was 
published. It also ran in four installments 
of the Pictorial Review, with a circulation of 
2,500,000. 

It is made on a lavish, stupendous scale, 
gorgeous in gowns and sets. Scenes include 
Venice, Paris, Florence — all the last word 
in luxury. 

"Dark Secreta." 
"My American Wife." 
"Drums of Fate." 
"Nobody's Money." 
"Adam't Rib." 
"Java Head." 



This is Allan Dwan's first production since 
he made "Robin Hood." It is a loye story 
of tremendous power. National advertising 
in the Saturday Evening Post and the Pic- 
torial Review will start the people looking 
for it. 

A real million dollar picture, with unlimited 
box-office and exploitation possibilities. 



"The White Flower." 

"Adam and Eva." 

"Racing Hearts'* 

"The Nth Commandment" 

"Mr Billing! Spendi Hii Dime" 




C£ (paramount Cpidure 



WATCH THIS 

SPACE 

TOMORROW 

FOR 

No. 14 



Short 
Stuff 



The value of the short 
subject to your program. 

How to build a pro- 
gram through the use of 
short stuff. 

How well known ex- 
hibitors use short sub- 
jects to advantage. 

"Fillers" at a price vs. 
real short subjects of 
material value. 

"How I pick my short 
subjects" by important 
Broadway managers. 

The news reel and its 
audience value. 

Just a few of the ideas 
that will be presented in 
the forthcoming Short 
Stuff issue of THE FILM 
DAILY, out Sunday, 
February 19. 



An unusual "buy" for 
the producer and distrib- 
utor of short subjects 




DAILY 



Monday, January IS, 192; 



On Broadway 

Astor— "The Third Alarm." 

Broadway— "The Flirt." 

Brooklyn Strand — "One Exciting 

Night." 
Cameo — "The Marriage Chance." 
Capitol — "Gimme." 
Criterion — "Salome." 
Loew's New York— Today— "Toll of 

the Sea." 

Tuesday — "The Headless Horse- 
man" and "The Snow Shoe 
Trail." 

Wednesday — "Arabia." 

Thursday — "East is West." 

Friday— "All the Brothers Were 
Valiant" and "The Love Gam- 
bler." 

Saturday — "Notoriety." 

Sunday — "Back Home and Broke." 
Lyric — "Hunting Big Game in 

Africa." 
Rialto — "Drums of Fate." 
Rivoli — "When Knighthood Was in 

Flower." 
Strand — "One Exciting Night." 



Next Week 

Astor— "The Third Alarm." 
Broadway — Not yet determined. 
Brooklyn Strand— "When Knight 

hood Was in Flower." 
Cameo — Not yet determined. 
Capitol— "Peg O' My Heart." 
Criterion — "Salome." 
Lyric — "Hunting Big Game 

Africa." 
Rialto — Not yet determined. 
Rivoli — Not yet determined. 
Strand — "Omar the Tentmaker." 



in 



Fire Averted at Laboratory 

Automatic sprinklers averted what 
might have been a serious fire at 
the Claremont laboratory in the 
Bronx on Thursday. 



Secure First Run House 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Melbourne — The First National 
Kxhibitor's Circuit of Australia has 
secured the Athenaeum Hall, a first 
run house here. 



"Fabiola" in Chicago 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Chicago — The Auditorium will run 
"Fabiola" for two weeks beginning 
Jan. 21. The picture was made in 
Italy and is in ten reels. 



Getting Early Release Dates 

British First National is getting 
early release dates despite the ad- 
vance booking system that has kept 
pictures off the screen for a year or 
two, according to reports from Ralph 
J. Pugh, in London. 



Foy Circuit Get Two More 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Dallas— The Ro-Nile and the Has 
kell have been added to the Fo 
chain. Two additional houses ar 
now in the course of construction. 



Name Changed 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Dover, Del. — The Great Outdoor 
Corp. of New York have changei 
their name to the Nat'l M. P. Institu 
tion of America, Inc. 



Four Reade Houses Closed 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Trenton, N. J. — Walter Reade'; 
Capitol, Grand and Trent in this citj 
and the Rivoli in New Brunswicl 
have been closed indefinitely, because 
of poor business. 



New Negative at the Right Price 

Frances Illington Presents 

"THE PIED PIPER" 

A masterful screen version of 

ROBERT BROWNING'S 

Immortal Poem 

"The Pied Piper of Hamlin" 

Beautiful Costumes — Massive Sets Designed and Built 
Expressly for this 2-reel Production. 

Main Title in Prizma 

For Screen Call 

LARRY WEINGARTEN— Bryant 3500 



To All Exhibitors 

In New York City and Surrounding Vicinity 

YOU are cordially invited to be the guest of FILM BOOKING 
OFFICES of America, Inc. — at the World's Premiere of the won- 
derful new H. C. WITWER-COLLIER'S WEEKLY— "FIGHT- 
ING BLOOD" stories, at the Astor Theatre, Tuesday, Jan. 16th, at 
11:30 A. M., at which time you will see on the screen and in action the 
great LEACH CROSS who will oppose George O'Hara, celebrated 
Pacific Coast flash and contender for the world's light weight crown, 
and star of the great "FIGHTING BLOOD" series. No matter what 
other important matters you have arranged for Tuesday Morning, Jan. 
16th, come to the ASTOR THEATRE, B'way at 45th St. 
You'll see the greatest series ever filmed when you see the 

H. C. WITWER-COLLIER'S WEEKLY 



"FIGHTING BLOOD 



>J 



STORIES 



f«- 



REMEMBER— 11.30 A.M. Tues. Jan. 16th at the 
Astor Theatre as our guest 



-»! 



FILM BOOKING OFFICES OF AMERICA, Inc. 

Main Office, F.B.O. Building, 723 7th Ave., N. Y. C. 

EXCHANGES EVERYWHERE 




THE 



iday, January 15, 1923 




Coast Brevities 

Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
llywood — Curt Rehfeld, for sev- 
rears assistant director to Rex 
m, will become manager of the 
m unit on the return of the di- 
■ to the Metro studios to make 
amouche." 



lry Lehrmann will direct Hoot 
n in "The Poor Worm." 



nte Collins, Jr., will head the 
jr Film art department. 



i McGowan has completed "The 
jhow," a kid comedy for Hal 
i. 



s Good Name." a Collier's story 
illiam McNutt, has been started 
iversal; director, Harry Pollard. 



ttle Church Around the Cor- 
has been completed by Warner 
ers. William A. Seiter directed. 



al scenes have been shot on a 
Ethel Clayton production, tem- 
ily titled "The Greater Glory." 



lis B. Mayer has appointed 
n Litson production manager 
e Fred Niblo, John M. Stahl and 
aid Barker units. Litson was 
xly production manager at the 
vyn studios. Wellington Wales 
een made business manager of 
layer forces. He was recently 
iated with Marshall Neilan in a 
ir capacity. 

H. E. GAUSMAN. 



Extensive Expliotation Campaign 

Pyramids has launched an exploita- 
tion campaign in behalf of the next 
five Pyramid Prods., involving dis- 
tribution of 3,000,000 heralds. 



Portland Wins Eschman Contest 
Portland, Los Angeles, Milwaukee 
and the New York exchanges are the 
winners, in the recently closed Esch- 
man Sales Contest, conducted by 
Pathe 1 . 



Blackton's Daughter Playing Lead 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
London — Violet Blackton, Stuart 
Blackton's 12 year old daughter, plays 
a leading ingenue role in her father's 
production, "The Virgin Queen." 



Fire in Boston 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Boston — Three floors of the Wash- 
ington theater building were wiped 
out by fire that did damage of about 
$75,000. 

Gade to Make "Faust" Sets 

Svend Gade has left for Hollywood 
to supervise construction of the sets 
for "Faust," in which Mary Pick- 
ford will appear. Gade, incidentally, 
directed the Asta Nielson version of 
"Hamlet." 



Norma's Latest Ready This Month 
First National will release Norma 

Talmadge's latest production, "The 

Voice From the Minaret," the latter 

part of this month. 

When Norma finishes "Within the 

Law," she will start "The Garden of 

Allah." 



"The Hero" in Exceptional Class 
The Exceptional Photoplay Com- 
mittee of the National Board of Re- 
view has placed "The Hero" in the 
category of exceptional pictures. 



Fox Releases 

"The Footlight Ranger," with 
Charles Jones, released on the 14th; 
Dustin Farnum's "Three Who Paid," 
released the 7th, and revival of 
"Salome," is scheduled for the 14th. 



Bill Rice Dead 

(Special to THE FILM DATLY) 
Chicago — Bill Rice operating the 
Seely on Roscoe Ave., and the Ham- 
lin on Belmont Ave., died at a Chi- 
cago hospital this week. 



Plan Theater in Chicago 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Chicago — A 1,200 seat theater will 
be built at Halsted and Madison Sts. 
It will be ready bv Spring and will 
run pictures and vaudeville. 



Film Agency's License Revoked 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — The State Labor 
Commission has revoked the license 
of the Classic Film Actor's Agency 
for violating the law by publishing 
false and misleading advertisements. 



Mich. M. P. T. O. Fighting United 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Detroit— The Michigan M. P. T. O. 
are fighting United Artists by way of 
penalizing Fairbanks for placing 
"Robin Hood" in the Orpheum with- 
out giving the three first-run houses 
in this citv a chance to deal for the 
film. 



Northwest Notes 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Seattle, Wash. — Councilman E. L. 
Blaine, President of the Puritan 
Theater Co., Mrs. Blaine, and Mr. 
and Mrs. A. B. L. Gellerman, were 
made defendants in two complaints 
asking for $1,000 filed in Superior 
Court. Dean Fred E. Bolton of the 
University of Washington faculty and 
Miss Bertha Hegman, public school 
teacher, the plaintiffs, ask for $500 
each, which they claim to have in- 
vested in stock in the the-.ter at 1305 
E. 45th St., upon the assurance of 
Blaine and Gellerman, that it would 
be redeemed upon 30 days notice, and 
which he now claims it is impossible 
to do. These complaints follow sev- 
eral made last week. The Seattle 
Title Trust Co., is suing the theater 
company and Samuel and Mary Eliza- 
beth Fried, who leased the ground on 
which the theater stands, for fore- 
closure of $55,000 mortgage. The 
G. & G. Theater Company sued for 
payments on projection machines and 
rest room furniture formerly used in 
Ye College Playhouse, and purchased 
bv the company. W. F. Jahn & Co., 
have filed a claim of $1,504.76 charged 
due. 



Madison, Wis. — The Grand has 
been purchased by F. W. Fisher and 
renamed The New Madison. 



George E. Bradley. Jr. recently ap- 
pointed publicity man for the Star 
Amusement Co., of Everett, has been 
made manager of the company's four 
houses, the Everett, Apollo, Star and 
Orpheum. 



B. P. FINEMAN 



Presents 



"DON'T MARRY FOR MONEY" 

By Hope Loring and Louis Duryea Lighton 
Directed by Clarence L. Brown 

A Million Dollar Title 

On a Great Story With a Remarkable Cast 

A Theme of Tremendous Interest to Every Woman in the World 

An Irresistible Title For the Box Office 

All Rights to Title and Story Fully Protected 



LITTLE ADS WITH BIG THOUGHT 



The only place of its kind in 
the World 

LLOYDS FILM STORAGE 



JOS, R. MILES 

Film Storage Vaults 
Cutting Rooms 
Projection Theatres - 

Packing for domestic arid ex- 
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Film Library 
Editing and Titling 

Custom Clearances and For- 
warding 



130 W. 46th St. 



Bryant 5600 



A Great Value 

To our clients is our aid in planning 
the development of their business. 

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Public Accountants and Business 

Advisors 

452 Fifth Ave. Tel. Longacre 9074 



THE 



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Phone Watkins 14 16-17 

Increased Facilities for 
Printing Colored Inserts, 
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IN A FEW WORDS— 

Editing and titling that will 
win the case for your picture 
before OLD JUDGE PUBLIC 

LESLEY MASON 
729 7th Ave. Bryant 8174 



w mB LAUB 

Film Continuity — Subtitles 
Editing Only the Highest Type 

of Independent Productions 
130 West 46th St. Bryant 9900 



ART 
TITLES 

LOUIS MEYER 

Craftsmen Film Laboratories 

251 West 19th Street 
Watkins 7620-7461 



ENLARGEMENTS 
of 

Motion Picture Film Clips 

For All Purposes 

W. J. MORAT 
302 E. 33d St. Vanderbilt 7361 



NEGATIVE TITLES 

10 cents per foot, including cards. 
Through our revolutionizing process 
we give you, choice of 10 high class 
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class illustrations. 24 hour service. 

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Address T-222, c/o 
The Film Daily. 



Watch this page every Monday. Exhibitors 
can find here the little things that help to build 
patronage. Producers the little things that 
go to make big pictures and Distributors 
the little big ideas that make for success. 



Story and Continuity 

FOR SALE 

Full of action, wonderful love theme. An out door 

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box-office. For details address T-666, 

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flfcRECOCMIZED 

Authority 




XXIII No. 15 



Tuesday, January 16, 1922 



Price 5 Cents 



Lawyers Agree 

Hitches in Standard Contract 
oned Out — Ready for Consider- 
ation of Exhibitors 

he committee of attorneys repre- 
ing the distributors who are mem- 

of the Hays organization, have 
e to an agreement on the features 

think should be embodied in the 
losed standard contract. 

is understood that in a few days 
contract as this committee has 
led it will be submitted to Will 
rlays and that the latter will then 
nit it to the various exhibitor 
es who have been a party to the 
'erences. The recent conferences 
the attorneys have worked out 
;factorily in that the objections to 
ain clauses which existed in one 
•ter have been amicably arranged. 

is hoped that there will be no 
issity for the framing of two con- 
ts and that one standardized form 
be satisfactory to the M. P. T. O. 
view York, the T. O. C. C. and 
national M. P. T. O. as well. 



Barry Coastward Bound 

Lesley Barry has left on a 12 
ks' personal appearance tour 
:h starts this week in Boston and 
> up in Los Angeles. In April he 
ts work on "David Copperfield" 
Warner Bros. 



Goldwyn Coming East 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
ollywood — Sain Goldwyn left 
s Sunday for the East. Before 
ing he signed Frances Marion to 
the continuity for "Potash and 
Imutter" in co-operation with 
itague Glass. 



T he Troubles of an 
Exhibitor 

Split Lip, Nevada. 
ir Danny: 

guess you've been wondering why 
haven't heard from me for the 
t two weeks and while I'm a little 
amed of the truth, this is how 
ters stand. 

got a picture from the Sprocket- 
Film Co. named, "Where Are 
Offsprings?" and I thought it 
lid be a smart stunt to take the 
n title off and let the audience 
ss the name of the picture. My 
l was all right but the film was all 
>ng. Folks not only guessed the 
le of the picture, but mine, the 
le of the theater and a lot of other 
les not fit to print and the next 
"ning guessed everybody's name in 
rt. I had to buy a new picture 
et and replace thirty broken seats 
vas not able to open for two weeks. 
(Continued on Page 4) 




"Secrets of Paris" beat everything that has played B. S. Moss' Cameo 
theater excepting "Peacock Alley" and "Sherlock Holmes," doing the 
biggest business that house has enjoyed in months where it stood 'em 
up during the week of January 7th. — Advt. 



"Roxy's Dinner" 

Clever Speeches and Program at 

Green Room Club — Capitol 

Show Burlesqued 

It was "Roxy's" night at the Green 
Room Club on Sunday. And it was 
a great night. Not only were there 
addresses from Marcus Loew, Rex 
Ingram, John Flynn and others, but 
during the show following the feature 
of the bill was the burlesque of a 
Capitol show, which sent Roxy into 
a spasm of laughter. It was well 
done and very funny. The stage of 
the Green Room theater is only about 
eight foot square, but this proved 
large enough for all the fun. The 
entire program was well arranged. 

Harry Reichenbach acted as toast- 
master. Joe Dannenberg, of THE 
FILM DAILY, was the first speaker, 
and was followed by John Flinn, who 
paid tribute to "Roxy's" ability as a 
showman. Hiram Abrams was ex- 
cused from talking, and Rex Ingram 
made a few remarks and was followed 
by Marcus Loew, who paid a lavish 
tribute to Rothafel. Incidentally he 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Loew Goes to Buffalo 

Marcus Loew left for Buffalo yes- 
terday. He will be gone until the 
end of the week. 



Limits Liability 

Supreme Court Decides for Express 

Companies in Suit Concerning 

Value of Shipments 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Washington — The Supreme Court 

has rendered an important decision 

that may have some effect on the 

status of film shipments sent via 
express. 

The court has decided that the 
fact that a shipper accepts an express 
receipt in which the liability of the 
company is limited in the event that 
the shipment is lost is in itself bind- 
ing, and that it is not necessary to 
secure the actual signature of the 
shipper or an agent to the agreement. 
The suit arose over the action filed 
by the American Railway Express 
Co., against A. J. Lindenburg. The 
West Virginia courts had held that 
the express company was liable for 
the full value of the shipments in- 
volved on the ground that Linden- 
burg had not agreed to be bound by 
the express company's receipt, in 
which definite limitations of the com- 
pany's liabilities were outlined. 



F. I. L. M. Club Holds Party 
The F. I. L. M. Club held its 
annual party at the Hotel Majestic 
on Saturday. 



Baumann to Produce 

And Distribute— Plans Tie-ups With 

Independent Exchanges — Going 

to Coast After Product 

Charles O. Baumann intends re- 
entering the producing and distribut- 
ing ends of the business and for that 
purpose has formed the Baumann 
Dist. Co., which will have offices in 
the Leavitt Bldg. 

He will be active head of the dis- 
tributing unit which will arrange re- 
lease through independent exchanges 
all over the country. Baumann says 
that deals with some have been 
made. He leaves for California 
shortly to line up product and 
promises release in the near future. 

Baumann has not been actively 
identified with production and dis- 
tribution for about five years. He 
said yesterday that since the Triangle 
and Keystone days he has been on 
the outside looking in, aj he puts 
it, waiting for the time to come when 
he could again become active. 



F. P. Common Breaks 

There was a break in Famous Play- 
ers common on the stock exchange 
yesterday. About 13,200 shares 
changed hands and at the close, the 
stock was quoted at 865/6 or 2^ below 
Saturday's price. The financial editor 
of the Evening Post in commenting 
on this said: 

"The acute weakness in Famous Players 
common was apparently the result of selling 
liy professional traders on the floor of the 
Exchange. It was based according to re- 
ports in the Street, on advance information 
concerning the unfavorable nature of the com- 
pany's annual report for 1922. There were 
also reports in circulation that the company 
would be obliged to do some financing, which 
it was said would take the form of a new 
stock offering. From an opening figure of 89, 
sales of a small volume of stock brought the 
quotation close to 85 before recovery set in 
about noon." 



Nazimova's Next? 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Local reports state 

that Nazimova's next picture will be 

"The World's Illusion," by Jacob 

Wasserman. 



Charles Bryant could not be 
reached yesterday for confirmation 
of the coast report. He was in 
Buffalo in connection with the 
opening of "Dagmar," Nazimova's 
new show. 



Deneker En Route 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Chicago — Clem Deneker of 
Pneumonia, Nev., arrived here 
yesterday en route to New York 
where he will address the 
A. M. P. A. on Thursday. 



THE 



■c&m 



DAILY 



Tuesday, January 16, 1922 




Vol. XXIII Nn. 15 Tuesday, Jan. 16, 1923 Price 5 Cents 

Copyright 1923, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 
. VV. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00, Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 
Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central Europea.. Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau, Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
vakia), Wenzelsplatz. 

Quotations 

High Low Clone Sales 

East. Kod. 96>i 95% 95% 1,000 

F. P.-L. .. 89 85>4 865/6 11,000 

do pfd. . 95 95 95 100 

G'wyn ... 5)4 5 T /> 5/ 2 1 400 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's.... 19 18>4 18-34 1.000 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 

Tully Back 

Richard Walton Tully returned on 
Sunday on the Bremen. He said he 
had found in Paris a remarkably 
beautiful girl, Andrec Lafayette^ who 
would have the star role in "Trilby." 



BEST THEATRES EVERYWHERE 

are using the following ad. mats in their 

newspaper advertising 



Coast Brevities 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Hollywood — Bernice Frank will 
play an important role in Wm. De 
Mille's "Grumpy." 



"Bella Donna," starring Pola Xegri, 
is completed. 



Babe London has been signed for 
Christie Comedies. 



Work on "Why Do We Live" will 
he started soon at the Fine Arts stu- 
dio. 



Ariel Sawyer has been signed to 
appear in Ruth Rowland's "The 
Haunted Valley." 



Bull Montana has started work on 
his latest Stromberg picture, "They 
Call It Dancing." 

Clayton Jones is on location at 
Palm Springs with the Hughes Com- 
pany. "Souls for Sale." 



J. L. Frothingham announces that 
he will produce the following in the 
coming year: "The Dice Woman." 
an original by Harvey Gates who is 
writing the continuity; a film version 
of a celebrated stage play; and an 
original by William V. Mong who 
will have leading role. 

H. E. GAUSMAN. 



Dietz 111 

Howard Dietz, of Goldwyn, is ill 
at home. 



r BIG AOOEO LAUGH 

HAZEL FBOM HOLLYWOOD" 
DOROTHY DEVORE ehristieComedy 

5£E THE MOV/IES KID THEIYI5E.Lve5 




Get them at all Educational Exchanges on al 

new Christie Comedies 

"An inch in time draws nine" 



f (&daxuxtlcma£ U-Lctu^jU^ 




TITLES 



NEGATIVE 
POSITIVE 
Inch CARDS 

15 CENTS PER FOOT 

24 Hour Service if necessary 

SIMPLEX TITLE SHOP 

220 W. 42d Street Bryant 0985 



Charnas in Town 

Harry Charnas is in from Cleve- 
land. Stopping at the Astor. 



Gasnier Leaves Wednesday 

Louis Gasnier leaves for Los An- 
geles tomorrow. His next picture 
for Preferred will be "Mothers-In- 

Law ." 



Hiers Here With Bride 

Walter Hiers was in town yester- 
day with his bride, en route to Savan- 
nah and the coast. His honeymoon 
was a present from Famous Players. 



National Board Lunch 

The annual luncheon of the Na- 
tional Board of Review will be held 
at the Waldorf on Feb. 3. "The 
Future of the Exceptional Photoplay" 
will be the topic discussed. 

Off for California 
W. J. German general manager for 
J. E. Brulatour and George Blair of 
the Eastman Kodak Co. left for Cali- 
fornia yesterday. They will be gone 
several weeks. 



Ohio M. P. T. O. Convention 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Columbus — The second annual 
State convention of the M. P. T. O. 
opens today at the Critenden Hotel, 
to last two days. 



Arthur Jacobs Here 

Arthur Jacobs is in town from the 
coast. He and Sam Rork have closed 
a deal covering "Wandering Daugh- 
ters" by Dana Burnett whereby 
James Young will produce it for 
First National. Production at the 
United Studio, Los Angeles. 



Harry Warner Returns 

Harry Warner returned from 
California on Sunday. 



ARTIST WANTED 
Layout and lettering. High class 
man only. Apply with samples. R. 
Dexter, Assoc. First Nat'l Pictures, 
7th Floor, 6 West 48th Street. 



SALESMAN 

Wanted immediately capable of 

selling film service to churches 

and schools in N. Y. State 

National Non-Theatrical 

130 West 46th St., N. Y. 



KLUTHO STUDIO IN FLORIDA 
FOR SALE 

Cooper-Hewitts hard lights and 
laboratory located on valuable 
ground in heart of city. Cost 
$65,000. Will-sell at a sacrifice. 
Reasonable amount in cash bal- 
ance on time. 
Will be' dismantled in 30 days if not sold 

H. J. Klutho, Owner 
Room 401 St. James Building 

Jacksonville, Florida. 
No coal needed, no snow and ice. 
Cheapest electric juice in the 
Country only 2 cents a kilowatt. 



Now at 203-5 W. 40th St. 
In our OWN LABORATORY 
' arid STUDIO 

ERNEST STERN 

The Titleman 
Phones Penn. 2373-2374 



03rrai ^tfrihcrrt 



4ljut an re GJr»rpara it mi 

RESOURCES - $5,000,000 

Knickerbocker Building 
Broadway at 42nd Street, N. Y. City 






Phone — Beekman 9091 




SBKVMtf 



119 Fulton St., N. Y. 

INSURANCE EXPERTS 

TO THE THEATRICAL AND 

MOTION PICTURE INDUSTRY 



Reproductive quality enables the sensitive 
emulsion to correctly portray every step of 
gradation from highest light to deepest 
shadow. 



EASTMAN 
POSITIVE FILM 

faithfully reproduces every tone 01 the 
negative. It carries the quality through 
to the screen. 



Eastman Film, both regular and tinted base — 
now available in nine colors, is identified through- 
out its length by the words "Eastman" "Kodak" 
stenciled in Hack letters in the transparent margin. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



esday, January 16, 1922 



[aine House Changes Hands 

[Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
rtland, Me. — Casco Amusement 
of which E. Loew is president, 
mrchased the Casco here. 



Mrs. Eager Returns 

s. Carolina Eager, who, accord- 
o newspaper reports, has been 
ig the world for the past four 
, "in the interest of clean 
es," returned from Europe on 
Jremen. 



arr and Schad Get Another 

[Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
ading, Pa. — Carr and Schad, who 
ite six theaters in this city have 
red the interest of the Reading 
s. Co. in the Lyric, and have 
i a long term lease on the prop- 
from the Fricker estate, the 
rs. 



HROMOS TRADING CO. 

1123 Broadway 



ite 616 



'Phone Chelsea 8264 



CASH AVAILABLE 
IMMEDIATELY FOR 
RELIABLE 
PROPOSITIONS 

Investigate ! 



wild friends? 




ill mate on army 
: new ones Sxyoix 



THE 



■c&a^. 



DAILV 






adaptation of * o> Lowr , s - 
story, T- nal .._ „ 



adaptation - - s Q . Lowne s - vwi u< . 

story, . Tnat . e o realism, and the pic 



swj, . „„.«n realism. -• — .- t ,;i»> OI 10/u, 
dramatic ^^ s mining distt g ^ the 
shots of ^"I'acterization and aC "" B . h sp ir- 
vital H* of' its charming \° man H \ a despite the 
aP ^ a note which runs through £**&«, the 
itual note « venee ance wnicn u" ca meo 

crUel S d ° tfle ThSe is something ° Q a c eSS ion 
rugged * ale - his production. ™ e ££ exce p- 
^i^torv stands out the acting is^ . o 
°* th ?,. St fiZ and the du 



s yi«~ - the acting « , - 
^thc'dUection is truly 



in- 



of the swjr 

tionally fine, ^ — 

Vs. - « ■ %srssi ?«s 

dovetailed. 1 here th at the kmdiy 

ches tne wu . one ot tnesc prom- 

to the scene whe n w ^rselr when 

slav <! ° v ing he/heart to the overseer 

a „ S d UC a h cting S l" b» Xrwith'-ean heart. 
Reerv, portraying a . mu /f s r expr ession. He is 

V2$£*S5£2K Te " And" his 
fired by the o ve ve ngeance. Ana 



from 



NOW 

at your 

Universal 

Exchange 



ver dominant. Her t . es 

^ a -^^^er^^actress 

™ ust Sha lulking bully of ^he ^s. 
leering, su ) kl , n r ? ta ble portrait to nis 6 
another .H^fjg^elj T expressed There » 

o^rjT which fflg ft fSfi^S 

the min A e «^heTuosequent scenes P of squ1s I ^ e S ^e* >* ^ ^ c£ 

A story oi *e con re J tfvet*' e ^&ssJ«&.et* ^l^^Zi 

have seen the tagn* ■ . for it. | ^aV}» 6 , s «S*eSfeY t»*^— ""^F/ll+r 



^^T\ f\2^<ca^ e v • tW* c . v L \e&? s " u- 






ine. -**- 
lows. Andthe A 



CARL 
LAEMMLE 
resents 



n its sweep. £ v ^ e '« the !%$£ {or it. 
- 8 ? me ,o W Iee Awhile a few are groping 
{using to see n, 
Get it qmcK. The Ca8t W seUa Dean 

;" r. . ■■'■■ •• .Robert Ems 

Joan Lovme; r - • .Kkthryn M c g"'" 

TTprsus DerncB "■ w n ace Beery 

K Barholro. ..••;;; ; ■ Wf red Ko er 

Eifc'B^;— :.:::::::::::»aSftg 

Baroness ■ • • • c rPna rio by t-1- 

Vlav up author anu . 

dignified campaign. , {or W g and little 

g Drowi»9 ^°«"rr 5 And good enough/or 
houses everywhere. AnOJ, ^ 



clause," ?. C £, tre i ■ 



Edi-toriai°Pade 
M.P.NEWS 



JJtvorcem, 
a, /*„_- 



^2/ startinn »a 
The cZVL W ,l th 



is " The '" n ff off wi 



i J an ^- 






1 ^o. 



Pnscilla 



»j* 



From one of 

nances Hodgson Burndfs 
•famous novefs 

A Hobarf Henley ProdiiiHon 
UNIVERSAL JEWEL 



"-THE PUEASUpe »S ALL YOURS" 



THE 



is&ak 



DAILY 



Tuesday, January 16, 19i 



The Troubles of an 
Exhibitor 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Been reading about that convention 
a* Pneumonia and it looks like apple 
sauce to me. Glad I didn't attend. 
They spend their time passing resolu- 
tions and how conditions can be im- 
proved and then go home and cut 
each other's throats. Put a herd of 
wildcats and rabbits in a cage and 
you have an exhibitors convention. 
If Frank Rembusch or Sidney Cohen 
had been there it might have been an- 
other story but the idea of the buz- 
zards in this territory getting to- 
gether is positively stupid. They all 
would be dollars and sense ahead if 
they'd stay at home and look after 
their business which is all shot to 
hell. 

I see where Metro is making a pic- 
ture called "The Light That Failed." 
It ought to go big in this community 
where the power houses go flooey 
every time you book a big special. 

Here's what I got for Christmas: 
Two C. D. D.'s — Six changes of dates 
— Three letters advising films with 
which I was booked burnt up — Re- 
gards from seven concerns — The 
poorest night in the year and a press 
book on a picture I ran two months 
ago. 

A fellow here wants to sell me 
some Triangle stock. How is it? 

ZEKE BEEZWAZ. 



Amusement Co. Dissolves 

Camden, N. J. — The Ocean Pier 
Amus. Co., have filed a certificate of 
dissolution. 



"Roxy's Dinner" 

(Continued from Page 1) 
said that the motion picture industry 
should have given the dinner to 
Rothafel, and not have this tribute 
come from the Green Room or any 
other organization. When "Roxy" 
took the floor he was visibly over- 
come. But he finally managed to 
tell about his work, and paid tribute 
to the men of his staff for their aid 
in the development of the Capitol. 
He predicted that the big Capitol of 
today was but a sign of what would 
come in the future. 



an 



Joe Klein Visiting 
Joe Klein, Lichtman special repre- 
sentative at the Charnas exchanges 
is in New York. 



Hodkinson Switches Managers 
A. W. Carrick, Hodkinson man- 
ager in Pittsburgh, has been trans- 
ferred to Buffalo. His place in 
Pittsburgh has been filled by Guy 
Ainsworth. 



Crystal Reverts to Pictures 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Milwaukee — Charles Toy has 
leased the Crystal for picture shows. 
The house adjoins the Toy, which 
also shows films. 



Arrange Canadian Release 

The Famous Players Film Service. 
Ltd., will distribute "Shadows," 
"Thorns and Orange Blossoms," 
"The Hero" and "Are You a Fail- 
ure?" in Canada by virtue of a deal 
with the Al Lichtman Corp. 



I!I!II!!ITII!I!IIIII!IHIIIIIIIIT1!II!!IHIIII!I!I 

INDEPENDENT PRODUCERS 

and Directors having produced, 
or who contemplate producing Extraordinary 
Features, Short Subjects or Star-Series, 
can now secure 100% distribution in the 
United States and Foreign Countries 
UPON A GUARANTEED BASIS. 
Releasing arrangements with 

EXCHANGES EVERYWHERE 

conducted and managed by 
independent and responsible "Hustlers," which 
assures individual attention and maximum 
results to Producers. 

B AIM ANN DISTRIBUTING CO. 

under the supervision of 
CHAS. 0. BAUMANN, originator and organ- 
izer of: — Kessel-Bauman, New York Motion, 
Keystone, Sales Co., Universal and Triangle 
Film Companies ; producers of Ince-Kay Bee, 
Sennett-Chaplin-Keystone and other 
Famous Productions. 



I'llIM 



130 W. 46th St., N. Y. City 
Telephone Bryant 4200 



ilium 



THE SUPER 39 ■ 

ALICE BRADY 



in 



No. 14 



a 



The Leopardess" 



By Katharine Newlin Burt 



Directed by Henry Kolker 

Released March 25th 



Scenario by J. Clarkson Miller 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



THE romance of a wild South Sea 
maiden and the man who tried to tame 
her. Scenes in the South Seas and in New 
York, providing vivid contrasts. Full of 
glamour and mystery — charged from start to 
finish with emotional and dramatic intensity. 



"Dark Secrets." 
"My American Wife.' 
"Drums of Fate." 
"Nobody's Money." 
"Adam's Rib." 
"Java Head." 




A strong supporting cast includes Montagu 
Love, Edward Langford, Charles Kent, 
George Beranger, Marguerite Forrest and 
Glorie Eller. This picture was directed by 
the man who made "Disraeli," and it is the 
best vehicle which Miss Brady has ever had. 



No. 8 "The White Flower." 

No. 9 "Adam and Eva." 

No. 10 "Racing Hearts" 

No. 11 "The Nth Commandment" 

No. 12 "Mr. Billing! Spendi Hit Dime" 

No. 13 "The Glimpses of the Moon." 



ERS-LASKY CORPORATION M 

.PH ZUKOQ £>..■>... t , L)E 




CC Cparamounl (picture 



WATCH THIS 

SPACE 

TOMORROW 

FOR 

No. 15 



tie BRADSTREET 
>/ FSLMDOM 




^recochdsi 
Authority 



XXIII No. 16 



Wednesday, January 17, 1923 



Price 5 Cent? 



U" Buys "Driven" 

:es Over Charles Brabin Feature 
and Plans an Immediate Re- 
lease for It 

Universal will distribute "Driven," 
production made by Charles 
bin. The company intends re- 
ing it in the near future, and 
•ks one of the very few outside 
chases made by that organization 
all of the years it has been in 
iness. 

;rabin had placed the sale of the 
ure in the hands of Charles R. 
*ers, president of the Resolute 
tis Sales, Inc. 



Williams Back 

. D. Williams has returned from 
coast. 



Flinn Goes to Coast 

ohn C. Flinn of Famous Players 
yesterday for Los Angeles to con- 
with Jesse L. Lasky regarding 

le Covered Wagon." 



Sues for $25,000 Damages 

through Robert Spear, his at- 
ney, William E. Burns, who was 
icted in July as a receiver of stolen 
is, has filed suit for $25,000 dam- 
is against the M. P. P. D. A.— 
Hays organization and the Pru- 
itial Film Service Corp., alleging 
licious prosecution. Burns al- 
es the indictments were procured 
h malicious intent to injure him. 
e Hays organization had no com- 
nt to make and no one at Pru- 
itial cared to discuss the matter 
terday. 



Unit System 

w Goldwyn Production Policy — 
Each Director to Have His 
Own Staff 

ioldwyn announced yesterday the 
1 system of production had been 
tailed at the coast studio, and that 
h director, in the future would 
r e his own production force, 
iach unit will lie separate and 
rate as such. When Marshall 
ilan joined Goldwyn he brought 
h him his entire staff. Eric Von 
oheim, King Yidor, Rupert 
ghes and others either have their 
n organization complete, or are 
the process of doing so. Neilan 
at work on "The Eternal Three," 
original by himself, while "Red 
jhts," which he originally planned 
ng, is being made by Clarence G. 
dger. 

\ileen Pringle and William 
lamond have been added to the 
ck company. 




" 'SECOND FIDDLE' may be put down as a likely production," says 
Moticn Picture News. The first Film Guild Production, starring Glenn 
Hunter for Hodkinson Release, will make money for any exhibitor. It 
has everything the box-office requires. — Advt. 



T. O. C. C. Dinner 

The T. O. C. C. will hold a beef- 
steak dinner at Healey's Feb. 1. 



Rothafel Going to Europe 

Sam Rothafel is planning a brief 
vacation in Europe. He expects to 
sail sometime next month. 



Sol J. Vogel Here 

Sol J. Vogel, Hodkinson distributor 
on the Pacific Coast is here from 
San Francisco. 



Get Pre-Release House in Tokyo 

The Imperial Hotel Auditorium of 
Tokyo has been opened as a pre- 
release house for Paramount pictures, 
according to cables received by E. 
F. Shauer of the Famous 1 'layers. 



Walsh Will Direct "Doug" 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — R. A. Walsh will 
direct "Doug" Fairbanks in "The 
Black Pirate." an original story by 
Fairbanks, which will take the place 
of "Monsieur Beaucaire." Production 
is slated to begin in a month. 



Louis Weiss Sells Holdings 

Louis Weiss has sold his holdings 
and resigned his posts with the vari- 
ous companies with which he has 
been identified including Artclass, 
Clarion. Numa and othirs. These 
various units will operate under 
supervision of Alfred Weiss, former 
vice-president of Goldwyn. 



Skouras Brothers Here 
Charles and Spyros Skouras were 
in town yesterday from St. Louis. 



Thomas Leaving Soon 

Clark W. Thomas, of the Thomas 
H. Ince organization, leaves for the 
coast soon. 



Coogans Coming 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — The Coogans are ex- 
pected to leave for New York soon. 

Metro Improving Studio 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Metro expects to 
spend about $500,000 in improving the 
studio. New lighting equipment will 
be one of the large items. 



Rueben Going to Coast 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Chicago — L. M. Rueben, president 
of the M. P. T. O., will be the 
guest at a luncheon given in his honor 
at Malloy's tomorrow. He leaves 
for California for a month's stay 
shortly. 



Leo Leaves; Sheehan Going 
Jack G. Leo, vice-president of Fox 
is en route to the coast on production 
matters. It is expected that Winfield 
Sheehan leaves on Sunday and that 
Joe Pincus who has been lining up 
comedy material here goes with him. 
There may be increased activity at 
the Fox coast studios in the next few 
weeks. 



Plan 20 Features 

Lesser- Ramish Enterprises Now Con- 
solidated in Principal Pictures — 

Irving Lesser Back 
Irving M. Lesser returned to New 
York yesterday from Los Angeles 
with the announcement that all of 
the Lesser-Ramish enterprises on the 
coast had been consolidated in one 
company: Principal Pictures Corp. 
While West Coast Theaters, Inc., 
will continue as such, Principal Pic- 
tures will be the main unit with Sol 
Lesser, president, Irving Lesser and 
Abe Gore, vice-presidents; Mike 
Rosenberg, secretary and Adolph 
Ramish, treasurer. 

Principal Pictures have plans 
under way for the production of 20 
features. Production will be centered 
in the Vidor studio, which, as noted, 
Principal has purchased. That deal 
was followed by the acquisition of 
30 acres adjoining the plant on Santa 
Monica Blvd. for the construction 
of outdoor sets. The plans include 
three Harold Bell Wright stories, 
one of them "The Recreation of 
Briant Kent"; "The Meanest Man in 
the World"; a series of four Irving 
Cummings Prod., the first to be 
"East Side. West Side," a series of 
four from the newly formed Sac- 
ramento Pictures Corp., the first to 
be "Temporary Marriage," starring 
Mildred Davis, three from a producer, 
whose name cannot be given as yet, 
and four more adapted from stage 
plays or successful published novels. 
Lesser plans to remain in New 
York permanently in char<re 'of dis- 
tribution. He has taken over larger 
offices on the 10th floor of the State 
Bldg. 



Wagner to Direct for Lasky 

Rob Wagner, author of numerous 
stories and articles appearing in the 
Saturday Evening Post ij to be a 
Paramount director. His first pic- 
ture will star Walter Hiers. 



Irvin Willat Here 
Irvin Willat has arrived from the 
Coast to direct "Fog Bound," to be 
made at the Paramount Long Island 
studio, with Dorothy Dalton as star. 
Paul Dickev will write the scenario. 



Experiences 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Cleveland — Clem Deneker 
spent yesterday here discussing 
hard-luck experiences of an ex- 
hibitor with Fred Desberg. 

Deneker left last night for 
New York. 



THE 



m 



-,%fr* 



DAILV 



Wednesday, January 17, 192. 




Vol. XXIII N 1. 16 W ednesday, Jan. 1 7, 1923 Price 5 Cents 

Copyright 1923, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 
J. VV. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
•t the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
Months, $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 
Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau, Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
vakia), Wenieliplatz. 

Quotations 

High Low Close Sales 

East. Kod. 95^ 93 '/ 2 93 Vi 1,200 

F. P.-L. . . 87 83 84^ 1,500 

do pfd. . 96 94J4 94% 900 

G'wyn Not quoted 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's ... 18^ 18K 18^ 1,600 

Triangle Not quoted 

'Worm Not quoted 

"Hearts Aflame" at Rialto 
"Hearts Aflame," goes into the 
Rialto the week of Feb. 4. It is a 
Metro release. 




ARTIST WANTED 

Layout and lettering. High class 
man only. Apply with samples. R. 
Dexter, Assoc. First Nat'l Pictures, 
7th Floor, 6 West 48th Street. 



ART TITLES 

LOUIS MEYER 

Craftsmen Film Lab. 
251 West 19th St. 
Watkins 7260-7461 



&&iAadet0anl 



Insure Your Screen 



Guts and Flashes 

"Adam and Eva," starring Marion 
Davies, opens at the Rivoli on Feb. 
11th. 



William B. Laub has edited and 
titled "The Sea Raiders," and is 
now editing, "Woman and Wine." 



C. C. Burr has already completed 
five All-Star comedies and a sixth 
will soon be ready for Hodkinson 
release. 



Conrad Tritschler, an English artist 
will come to America as part of Rich- 
ard Walton Tully's producing organ- 
ization. 



.''"Messmore Kendall, has been ap- 
pointed an aide on the staff of Gover- 
nor Edwin P. Morrow of Kentucky 
with the rank of Colonel. 



Maurice Costello is returning to 
the screen in "The Glimpses of the 
Moon," an Allan Dwan production, 
now being filmed. 



Macey Harlam and Fuller Mellish 
have been engaged by J. Searle 
Dawley, to appear with Mary Carr 
in "Broadway Broke." 



Ennis Going to Chicago 

Bert Ennis leaves for Chicago this 
week to handle exploitation for 
"Quincy Adams Sawyer" which opens 
at the Chicago theater on Jan. 29. 



DeMille on Pleasure Trip 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Cecil DeMille, ac- 
companied by John H. Fisher, Capt. 
William Bethell, Carmen Runyon, 
Paul Iribe, Dr. Frank Watson and 
Joseph I. K^ne, are away on a six 
weeks' hunting and exploring trip to 
the barren Tiburon Island, located 
in the Infernal Channel, in the Gulf 
of California. 



At Broadway Theaters 

Capitol 

"Thirteenth Hungarian Rhapsody" is the 
overture followed by Frederic Fradkin sing- 
ing "Zigeunerweisen" (Gypsy Airs). The 
Capitol Magazine is next. Unit No. 4 is 
Divertissements, (a) "Voices of Spring," 
with Betsy Ayres, Mile. Gambarelli, Alexan- 
der Oumansky, Doris Niles and Thalia Zanou; 
(b) "Carolina in the Morning," sung by 
Robert Davis. Lyman Howe's "Hodge 
Podge," a short Educational reel, precedes 
the feature, "Gimme,'' with an all star cast. 
"The Parade of the Tin Soldiers," by the 
Capitol Orchestra and the latest Aesop Fa- 
ble, "The Fable of a Fisherman's Jinx," are 
the last numbers of the bill. 



Cameo 

"Valse Suite," arranged by E. Kilenyi, is 
the overture. The regular News Pictorial, 
a Cameo Cartoon and a violin solo rendered 
by Kreisler follow. "Shiloh," from "The 
Voice of the Land," a single reel, and the 
comedy, Snub Pollard in "Big Up," are 
screened before the feature, "The Marriage 
Chance." An organ solo played by John 
Priest completes the program. 



Rialto 

The second and fourth movements from 
the Fourth Symphony and Riesenfeld's Clas- 
sical Jazz open the program, followed by 
the weekly magazine and the Fairbanks Twins, 
from the Music Box Revue, in "The Mirror" 
Dance, a music film. "Dear Old Pal of Mine" 
is next, sung by Thomas Cowan, baritone. 
A Gypsy Dance by the Serova Dancers and 
Will Rogers in "Fruits of Faith" follow the 
feature, Mary Miles Minter in "Drums of 
Fate." 



Strand 



The Mark Strand Topical Review is the 
first number. A prelude to the feature, D. 
W. Griffith's "One Exciting Night," ren- 
dered by the Strand Orchestra, is next. An 
organ solo finishes. 



At Other Houses 

"The Third Alarm" is in its second week 
at the Astor, Criterion still houses "Salome" 
indefinitely, "Hunting Big Game in Africa" 
continues on at the Lyric, and "When Knight- 
hood Was in Flower" is held for a second 
week at the Rivoli. 



Ready to Make "The Fog" 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
San Francisco — Max Graf and Ej 
H. Van Loan have returned frorJ 
Los Angeles and are ready to star! 
work on "The Fog" which Metro will 
release. 



WANTED 
Bookkeeper — male — familiar with filn 
business. National Non-Theatrica 
Motion Picture Co., Inc., 130 Wes 
46th Street, New York City. 



4r[trutrtfc GJorp oration 

RESOURCES - $5, 000,000 

Knickerbocker Building 
Broadway at 42nd Street, N. Y. City 



: 



■.iMetwational JDistribttters of 
r Tx _ MOTION ^PICTURES 



EV : -'«$Sl 



jNTHrfkEAN Film Corporation' 



INTER-OCEAN BUILDING 

218: WEST 42hdSf;;"' ' : N^W ^TtK 

" BRYANT -78 12- -.."". 

WHEN YOU THINK OT 
. FQ REIGN VTHIJ4KVOF 

•INTE<R-Q^E;AiN 



Sweeping The Country ! 

"Thorns and Orange Blossoms" is the big attraction sensation of the season. 
Already booked for 

LOEW'S WARFIELD, SAN FRANCISCO BROADWAY STRAND, DETROIT 
ALDINE, PHILADELPHIA LOEW'S STATE, LOS ANGELES 

BOSTON THEATRE, BOSTON THE CAPITOL, CINCINNATI 

AND IN EVERY BIG CITY 

Here is a great story by Bertha M. Clay, a great cast, A GREAT PICTURE, 
Directed by Gasnier. Book it now and cash in! 



* * 



And don't forget "THE HERO," another Gasnier Production. All the critics 
have praised it. Exhibitors are talking about it. The public is DEMANDING it. 
Book it now and cash in ! 

ALLICHTMAN. 

Produced by President Al Lichtman Corporation. 

Preferred Pictures, 

B. P. Schulberg, President. 



lesday, January 17, 1923 
mi i it in ■if mTiriiiiiMin 




itlie'N 



ews 



No. 6 



:UHR OCCUPATION — Territory 
I by French and Belgian forces. 

ITALY— Mussolini is hailed by 

RIVER, CHINA— Flood makes hun- 
>meless. 

items from Rockville, Md., Bovil, 
Brooklyn, Dallas, Manchester. 

THE FIRST NEWS REEL 
THE REAL NEWS FIRST 

NEWSlOF THE WORLD 



I 



oda 




Hunts Increase Capital 
pecial to THE FILM DAILY) 

idelphia — Hunt's Theaters have 
ed their capital stock from 
300 to $1,500,000. 



oe May Suing U. F. A. 

pecial to THE FILM DAILY) 

in — Joe May, producer of "Mis- 
if the World" has filed a suit 

the U. F. A., seeking damages 
million marks. 

alleges that U. F. A., when 
ild the film to the United States 
the contract by cutting and al- 
the picture, thereby ruining it. 



Horace Starr Dead 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Lorain, O. — Horace Starr, old-time 
exhibitor, and former owner of the 
Amuse-U, on the site of which now 
stands the Pantheon, died last week 
at the home of his sister in Elyria. 



Gibson's Next Four Selected 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Hoot Gibson's next 
four pictures for Universal will be 
"Katy Didd," "The Shave Tail," 
"Well Done Riley" and "Out O' 
Luck." Edward Sedgwick will 
direct all of them. 



Against Arbuckle in Canada 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Montreal — The Montreal Women's 
Club has requested the Quebec 
Board of Censors to maintain the ban 
on Arbuckle pictures in Quebec. 

The executive of the Saskatchewan 
Social Service Council, with head- 
quarters at Regina, has forwarded a 
protest to Will H. Hays against per- 
mitting Arbuckle to appear on the 
screen again. 



Famous Has Option on "The Op- 
pressed" 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Paris — Famous Players has taken 
over distribution for France on "The 
Oppressed," produced by William 
Elliot with Rachel Meller the famous 
Spanish comedienne in the leading 
role. 

Ben Blumenthal has purchased this 
production for several European 
countries, and it is understood that 
Famous Players has an option on the 
production for America. 



Rounan Here 
John Rounan, identified with the 
production of "Snooky" comedies, is 
at the Astor. There has been some 
litigation recently with C. L. Chester, 
over the "Snooky" series. 



Linder to Make Feature Comedy 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Max Linder is ex- 
pected to arrive here the latter part 
of this week, to start work on a 
nine-reel comedy. 



TITLE - STORY- PRODUCTION -CAST 

You have them all in 
THE LUND PRODUCTION 

"LOVE'S OLD SWEET SONG" 

With Louis Wolheim, Helen Lowell, Donald Gallaher and 

Helen Weir. 

NORCA PICTURES, Inc. 1540 Broadway, N. Y. City 



*WE NEVEP DISAPPOINT' 



aTlTi 



PHONE 
BRYANT 5576 



INCORPORATED. 

2 20 WEST 42*$ STPEEt^ 

■t'~- ^NEW ypRK r 



-ALLAN A.LOWNES. 
GEN. MCQ. . 



THE SUPER 39 

POLA NEGRI i 



a 



Bella Donna 



yy 



No. 15 



A GEORGE FITZMAURICE PRODUCTION 

Adapted by Ouida Bergere from the novel by Robert Hichens 

Supported by CONWAY TEARLE, CONRAD NAGEL and LOIS WILSON 

Released April ist 



No 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



HER first American picture! Here's 
something the whole world has been 
waiting for. Made by a great American di- 
rector, with an American cast, and with all 
the technical facilities which Paramount can 
supply. 

"Dark Secrets." 

"My American Wife." 

"Drums of Fate." 

"Nobody's Money." 

"Adam's Rib." 

"Java Head." 

"The White Flower." 




•AFAMOUS PLAYERSIASKY CORPORATION P 



- ADOLDH 2UKOO 



The story has been famous as a novel and 
as a play. It is one of the most dramatic 
and emotionally powerful ever written. 
Paramount has spared no expense to make 
this one of the biggest ever made. 



No. 9 "Adam and Eva." 

No. 10 "Racing Hearts'' 

No. 11 "The Nth Commandment" 

No. 12 "Mr. Billingi Spendi Hii Dime" 

No. 13 "The Glimpses of the Moon." 

No. 14 "The Leopardess." 




(X paramount Gpiciure 



WATCH THIS 

SPACE 

MONDAY 

FOR 

No. 16 



1 

: 



THE 



u'J«. «Mf»i*i 



•<&m 






DAILY 



Wednesday, January 17, 192 



Newspaper Opinions 

" Gim me"— Goldwy n 

Capitol 

DAILY NEWS— We greatly admired the 
work of Miss Chadwick ; she's really awfully 
good. Then we liked Henry Walthall's 
small bit as a male housekeeper, but we 
did not like Mr. Hughes"s sentimentalizing 
of the reason for the situation. We think- 
that on the whole he can make better pic- 
tures. 

MORNING WORLD— We are just about 
convinced, however, that Mr. Hughes is 
more than a little bit insincere in these 
"pictures of life." Rather, we imagine, he 
puts his heel on his real thought : "This 
will make a picture play." * * * 

This motion picture is extremely well 
photographed and is acted perfectly by Miss 
Chadwick and Mr. Glass. It is titled 
brightly by Mr. Hughes. * • * 

TIMES — Rupert Hughes seems to have 
had a line in view when he started his 
latest photoplay "Gimme." * * » Capitol 
this week, but he didn't hew very dose to 
it as he went along. * * • Helene Chadwick. 
* * * succeeds in vitalizing her role, despite 
the incredible things she is called upon to 
do. Kate Lester is also good, as usual. 

TRIBUNE—* * * It is a nice, friendly 
comedy that even Rupert Hughes might be 
proud of. We think next to "Hold Your 
Horses" it is the most entertaining of all the 
Hughes pictures. 

MORNING TELEGRAPH— Cap it o 1 's 
"Gimme"' 'is flawless film. Rupert Hughes 
photo-play a delightful story of the newly- 
wed's problems. Is well cast and pictured. 

HERALD—* * * a dignified, intelligent 
and well modulated production, and reflects 
much credit on the versatile Major Hughes. 

EVENING WORLD— "Gimme" is not as 
good as some things Hughes has done, 
nor is it as bad. Not by a long shot. 

TELEGRAM— With unerring aim, Rupert 
Hughes has hit the popular taste * * * 
warm human quality and its genial comedy 
effects. * * • 

MAIL — But the real theme of the play 
is less modern, being nothing more than the 
old story of a wife's difficulties in extracting 
money from her husband. With so slender 
a plot it is not surprising that the film 
drags a good many of its 10,000 feet or so. 

GLOBE — The majority of theatergoers 
will find Rupert Hughes's latest cinema 
effort interesting, and therefore entertaining. 

SUN—* * * very pleasant and alluring 
comedy. * * * 

EVENING POST— New Rupert Hughes 
moving picture has many interesting features. 



"Drums of Fate"— F. P.-L. 

Rialto 

MORNING WORLD—* * * deals with 
Africa in the best cinema fashion. It is 
never very exciting, and save for some fair 
acting by Maurice B. Flynn, is monotonously 
adventurous throughout. 

TIMES — The only real acting in the piece 
is done by Fawcett, who doesn't have much 
of a chance as the girl's guardian, and Cas- 
son Ferguson, who makes the most of the 
musician's role. 

MORNING TELEGRAPH— There are 
some very interesting shots of the African 
jungle and the native uprisings are quite 
realistic and exciting. 

The cast is an excellent one. 

TRIBUNE — As far as the male contingent 
is concerned, "Drums of Fate" is a success. 

DAILY NEWS— "Drums of Fate" im- 
pressed us as being sort of a junket around 
the Paramount studio. * * * We rather 
liked the work of Yale's ex-football star. He 
is a fine figure of a man, and if given decent 
things to do should be popular. Miss Minter 
ran the gamut of emotions successfully. 

HERALD — Miss Minter's picture is six 
reels in length and cost a great deal of 
money. Mr. Rogers's film is a paltry three 
reels, and probably cost about as much as 
Miss Minter's salary for one week. 

In spite of all this "Fruits of Faith" is 
better entertainment than "Drums of Fate" — 
inestimably better. 

EVENING WORLD—* * * a corking 

good Paramount romance. * * * 

Mary Miles Minter * * * really does some 

fine work. She is ably aided and abetted. 
* * * 

TELEGRAM—* * * an absorbing film 
drama full of romance and adventure. 

MAIL — Miss Minter's acting in the 
"Drums of Fate" is worthy of praise, but 
the story handicaps her too greatly. 

The cast of the picture, however, is un- 
usually competent. 

GLOBE — If there has been a worse pic- 
ture shown on Broadway this season it was 
the good fortune of this reviewer not to 
have been present. 

SUN — The story is a revival of the 
"Enoch Arden" school, but it is cleverly 
worked out and the film is full of atmos- 
phere. 

EVENING POST— Like most Paramount 
pictures, "Drums of Fate," at the Rialto, 
has good photography, settings and direc- 
tion — this time Charles Maigne did the di- 
recting — but the film, adapted from a novel 
by Stephen French Whitman, is found want- 
ing in many instances. 



Lynch Bros. Buy Gladwin Park 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Detroit — Dick and Tom Lynch 
have purchased the Gladwin Park for 
$100,000. 



Beecher Sells Out 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Grand Rapids, Mich. — G. L. Wilier 
and H. B. Boshaven, of the Beecher 
Circuit, have bought the interest of 
the Beecher Estate in the theater 
company, thereby acquiring the con- 
trolling stock. 



Keaton Making "Three Faces" 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Buster Keaton's first 
feature length comedy for Metro; un- 
der the new contract will be "Three 
Faces," now in work. Wallace Beery 
and Lionel Belmore are in the sup- 
port. 

Straw Vote Favors Arbuckle 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Kansas City — The Kansas City 
Journal recently took a straw vote on 
the question of whether or not Ar- 
buckle should return to the screen. 
The result was ten to one in favor of 
Arbuckle. 



Detroit — Jake Schreiber of the 
Blackstone took a straw vote last 
week and the majority favored the 
showing of Arbuckle films. 



May Be Three "Fausts" 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — There may be three 
versions of "Faust". Mary Pickford 
will make one; Ferdinand Pinney 
Earle plans another while there is a 
French version in this country, await- 
ing release. Miss Pickford may have 
a lawsuit on her hands if the Lavel 
Photoplays Co. Ltd. of Canada car- 
ries out its intention of filing suit on 
the ground that it has copyrighted all 
existent versions of Goethe's master- 
piece. 



Jenal In From Burbank 
Frank P. Jenal, general counsel 
Sacred Films, Inc. is here from Bt 
bank. Calif. 



3p fte <fenwy 
Wter yxt? 




NEGATIVE FOR SALE 



High-class, new 5-reel Ameri- 
can made out-door feature. 
Great bargain for quick action. 
Box S-2 c/o Film Daily. 



15 



A WOMAN IN CHAINS 

with 

E. K. LINCOLN MARTHA MANSFIELD 

Mrs. RUDOLPH VALENTINO W. H. TOOKER 

Is the First Release 
of the 

AMALGAMATED EX CHANGES OF AMERICA, Inc. 

Denman Thompson's Sunshine of Paradise Alley 

Now in Preparation. 



(e BRADSTREET 
< FILMDOM 




jfeRECOCMZEI 

Authority 



CXIII No. 17 



Thursday, January 18, 1923 



Price 5 Cents 



hio Referendum 

!e Launched to Test Censorship 
-Matter Up at Columbvs 
Convention 

Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
tmbiis O. — At the conv ntion 

M. P. T. O. of Ohio, Mrs. O. 
■well, first vice-president of the 
and Cinema Club, made a 
; address, in which she declared 
the co-operation of women's 

in Ohio had made censorship 
essary because of the close co- 
ion between the clubs and the 
r owners. She agret d to bring 
e question of Sunday closing 
:ensorship before the C.nema 

with the ultimate purpose of 
iting a referendum to th( 
iture. 
: meeting is being held in the 

Chittenden, with about 325 ex- 
rs present. At the dinner h Id 
ay night, the speakers w re 
President Martin Smith of 
o, M. J. O'Toole, chairman of 
National Public Service Corn- 
! of the M. P. T. O.; Sydney 
(Continued on Page 3) 



Saenger and Richards Here 
an Saenger and E. V. Richards 
the Astor. They are spending 
days here prior to embarking 
four months round the world 
Mrs. Richards will also make 
ip. 




Earnings Held Up 

Famous Players Financial Condition 

Excellent— $1,C00,000 Note 

Wiped Out 

Auditors of Famous Players are 
now at work on the company's annual 
statement, which will not be ready 
for some weeks, in view of the re- 
ports yet to be made by a large per- 
centage of the 145 odd subsidiaries 
operated by the parent company. 

It is expected that the earnings for 
1922 will be about on a par with those 
of 1921. There is a possibility that 
the figures may drop below those of 
1921 in view of the fact that the busi- 
ness slump extended into the first 
fix months of the year. The earn- 
ings at the end of the third quarter 
of' 1922 were about $2,800,000 and 
while this figure would perhaps, in- 
d cate a drop from the approximate 
54,000,000 total of 1921, the returns 
for the last three montl s of 1922 are 
expected to swell the earnings close 
*o the 1921 total. 

(Continued on ('.age 5) 



Bushman- Bayne in Series 

.ncis X. Bushman and Beverly 
e intend making a number of 
"es so constructed that in key 
they can appear in a spoken act 
id of one reel. In those cities 
2 they don't appear, the required 
vill be included in the feature. 



rhrough Goldwyn 

arker Read Making "The Cow- 
ard" — Arrangement for One 
Picture Only 

Parker Read, Jr., is at work on 
icture tentatively called "The 
ard." Distribution will be 
igh Goldwyn under a one picture 
lgement only. 

ad and Ralph Ince are co- 
ting, and at present are shoot- 
exteriors in Miami. The story 
r Jack Boyle, and in the cast 
rlenry Hull, Doris Kenyon and 
5 Wolheim. 



See Page 2 

or News of the Independent 
iarket. 



Important Decision 

Rendered Relative to Foreign Mar- 
ket — Say Case May Be Appealed 

A decision of importance, especially 
f o the foreign market, and foreign 
buyers, developed yesterday when a 
Supreme Court jury, before Justice 
Black, awarded Max Glucksmann a 
verdict of $5,000 against Gillespie 
Bros. It is understood the case will 
be appealed. 

The case involved the questions of 
damages that may be recovered by 
one claiming that his rights had been 
infringed and made valueless by 
pirated copies appearing in the ter- 
ritory for which he claimed exclusive 
rights. 

It appears that Gillespie purchased from 
Select Pictures the exclusive right to 10 pic- 
tures for the territory of Brazil and that 
Gillespie Bros, also acted as agents for Cine- 
matografica Sud Americana who purchased 
the rights to exhibit the same pictures in the 
territory of Argentine and Chile. It is alleged 
the royalty provided for in the contract be- 
tween Select and Cinematografica Sud Amer- 
icana was not paid and for that reason Select 
(Continued on Page 6) 



Variety said of "Secrets of Paris": "It is bound to be a draw for it is the 
best kind of rugged melodrama that will appeal to all strata of fans. 
The crowd filled the lobby out to the street box office."— Advt. 

Selling Points 

For Production — Ragland on Coast 
for Asso. Exhibitors 

John C. Ragland of Associated Ex- 
hibitors is en route to Hollywood 
where he will confer with producers 
with regard to correspondence that 
has been passing for several months. 
It is expected he will remain 
indefinitely. Ragland will establish 
headquarters in Hollywood and will 
devote the bulk of his time to watch- 
ing productions being made for his 
organization, primarily with a view 
of seeing to it that essentials to the 
sale of a picture be given room in the 
productions. 

Associated Exhibitors have several 
units making pictures for release 
through that organization, including 
Douglas McLean, Madge Bellamy, 
Florence Vidor and Leah Baird. The 
idea of having a representative at Hol- 
lywood for the purpose of having in 
production such ideas as will aid in 
selling the picture is being carried 
out by several companies, notably 
Famous Players. 



Paramount to Film Grey Stories 
The current and future works of 
Zane Grey are to be produced by 
Paramount. The first will be "To 
the Last Man," and will be directed 
by Victor Fleming, to be followed by 
"The Heritage of the Desert" and 
"The Wanderer of the Wasteland." 



Sailing Jan. 27th 
Wanda Hawley will sail from New 
York for London on Jan. 27th. to 
appear in a picture Tom Terriss will 
make for Gaumont, Ltd. 



Plans For 12 

Two of Distinctive's Program in 

Work — No Distribution Set 

As Yet 

Distinctive Productions have plans 
under way for 12 features two of 
which, "Backbone" and "The Ragged 
Edge" are now in. While Arthur S. 
Friend yesterday was non-commital 
so far as other vehicles are concerned, 
it is understood he has practically 
closed for a number of stories. 

In a few days, distribution may be 
arranged for. It is understood that 
at least two important distributors 
have made bids for the series. 



Fletcher in Town 
Benjamin H. Fletcher, publisher of 
"Movie Age," the regional published 
in Omaha for Iowa and Nebraska, is 
in town. 



Clem's Here 

Armed with a carpet bag full 
of mats, unused slides and un- 
opened press books, together 
with a steamer trunk contain- 
ing his collection of especially 
designed one-sheets, Clem 
Deneker, of Pneumonia, Nev., 
has arrived in town. He will 
address the A. M. P. A. weekly 
lunch today, at the Boulevard. 



THE 




sm 



-e&?k 



DAILV 



Thursday, January 18, 1923 

rreifffflMTifrrm ifc — i»> 



Vol. XXIII Na. 17 Thursday, Jan. 18,1923 Price 5 Cents 

Copyright 1923. Wid's Film and Film Folks, 

Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St.. 

New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 

FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 

J. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 

«£«; J- A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 

at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 

the act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 

of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 

months, $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 

$15.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 

Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 

Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 

Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 
Wabash Ave. 

London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Atc., London, W. 1. 

Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 
Clichy. 

Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau', Prague (Czecho- Slo- 
vakia), Wenzelsplatz. 

Quotations 

High Low Close Sales 

East. Kod. 95J^ 93^ 93]/ 2 1,200 

F. P.-L. ..87 83 843/6 1,500 

/ do pfd. . 96 94% 94% 900 

/ G'wyn Not quoted 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's ... 18% 18^ 18^ 1,600 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 

Doris Pawn Leaves 

Doris Pawn who has been in town 
for a few days left for the coast yes- 
terday. 

Greenberg Here 

Phil Greenberg, exploiteer for F. 
B. O. at St. Louis, has resigned and 
is now in New York where he ex- 
pects to remain permanently. 

Order "Passion" Title Changed 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Edmonton — "Passion" was pre- 
sented at the Monarch the week of 
Jan. 8 as "Passion to Win," the Al- 
berta censors having ordered this 
change in title. 

Herman Lieber Here 

Herman Lieber, who operates the 
Circle, Indianapolis together with his 
brother, Robert is serving as a mem- 
ber of the First National rotating 
committee. 







SIMPLEX TITLE SHOP 

220 W. 42nd St. 
Announces the closing of a contract 
giving it exclusive sales rights on the 

FAMOUS STONE LIBRARY 
Over two million feet of selected shots 
as far bark as 1897, negative and posi- 
tive, are now made available for your 
requirements. 

Phone Bryant 0984-0985 



Among The "Independents 



99 



Reorganizing Second National 
A complete reorganization of Sec- 
ond National Pictures Corp. is under 
way. Dale Hanshaw is doing the 
work. 



Lewis Starts Another 

Edgar Lewis has completed "Are 
You Guilty?" and will start work 
shortly on "Oh, Ye Fools," for C. 
C. Burr. 



Primrose Lining Up Product 
Charles H. Rosenfeld of Primrose 
Pictures states his company will 
handle a series of eight five reel west- 
erns featuring William K. Hackett; 
12 two reelers with Charles Williams, 
12 one reel fairy stories featuring 
Geraldine Will and "Men Women 
Hate," a five reeler. 



Sterns Buy Several Stories 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — The following stor- 
ies have been purchased by Julius 
and Abe Stern for Century Comedies. 

For Baby Peggy: "Tilly Jones," 
"Little Trouble Mender," "Smile 
Maker," "Kissable Tess," "Sweet- 
heart of the Mounted," and "Kid 
Tears." 

For Brownie, the dog: "Dogdom," 
"A Dog's Day," "Dog Tracks," and 
"His Master's Breath." 

For Buddy Messenger: "Slim 
Saunders. Detective" and "Amateur 
Gangsters." 



Sold For Australia 

Australasian Films, Ltd., will 
handle "More To Be Pitied" and 
"Only a Shopgirl" in Australia. 



Aywon Jan. Releases 

Three features scheduled for Ay- 
won release this month are: "The 
Storm Girl," "Back Fire," and "The 
Flash." 



Washburn Signed For "Temptation" 

Bryant Washburn has been signed 
to play a leading role in "Tempta- 
tion," the third of C. B. C.'s "Six 
Box Office Winners." 



Scott on Trip 

Lester F. Scott, Jr., general sales 
representative for C. C. Burr, is away 
on an extended business tour through 
the Middle West. 



Pacific Steamers to Show Films 
An arrangement has recently been 
entered into by the Oriental line, 
with the F. B. O., whereby all the 
passenger vessels of that line will 
be supplied with screen entertain- 
ment. 




INDEPENDENT PRODUCERS 

and Directors having produced, or 
who contemplate producing Extraordinary 
Features, Short Subjects or Star-Series, can now 
secure 100% distribution in the United States and 
Foreign Countries UPON A GUARANTEED 
BASIS. Releasing arrangements with 

EXCHANGES EVERYWHERE 

conducted and managed by independent 
and responsible "Hustlers," which assures 
individual attention an'd maximum results'^ to 
Producers. 

BAUMANN DISTRIBUTING CO. 

under the supervision of 
CHAS. O. BAUMANN, originator and organizer 
of: — Kessel - Bauman, New York1*Motion, 
Keystone, Sales Co., Universal and Triangle Film 
Companies; producers of Ince - Kay Bee, 
Sennett- Chaplin -Keystone and other Famous 
Productions. 

130 W. 46th St., N. Y. City 
Telephone Bryant 4200 



I 



r.iiiuiniiiiiiiiHiiiiiidiiiiiPiiiiiiiiiWiiiu 



in iimpiiiiiiiiiii iiiiinniiiiiiiffliimiiinn ii 



Witwer In From Coast 
H. C. Witwer is here from the 
coast. 



3rd Week for "Knighthood" 

"When Knighthood Was in Flow- 
er" will remain at the Rivoli for a 
third week. "Dark Secrets" goes in- 
to the Rialto. 



First Runs in the Chicago 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Chicago — Balaban and Katz have 
bought "The Christian" and "The 
Strangers' Banquet" for Chicago. The 
first run will be at the Chicago the- 
ater. 



Kershaw Heads Manitoba Assn. 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Winnipeg — At the annual meeting 
of the Manitoba Exhibitors Assn. at 
the St. Charles Hotel, R. Kershaw 
was re-elected president by unani- 
mous vote, this being his third term 
in the office. George F. Law, local 
manager of Universal, was elected 
vice-president and representative of 
the exchanges. Frank R. Hyde was 
re-elected treasurer and Gordon C. 
Lindsay secretary. The association 
decided to throw open its membership 
to legitimate houses. 



Brenon Starts Work 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Production has be- 
gun on Herbert Brenon's first pro- 
duction for Paramount "The Rustle 
of Silk," with Betty Compson and 
Conway Tearle. 

Walter Hier's next picture will be 
"Seventy-five Cents an Hour," by 
Frank Condon. Joseph Henabery 
will direct with Jacqueline Logan as 
lead. 

Agnes Ayres' next picture will be 
"Contraband." Wesley Ruggles will 
direct. 



*L fc-f ©ten / 





sure can 
do it / 



THE 



rsday, January 18, 1923 




3 



Dhio Referendum 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Zohen, Mrs. Gurwell and Max 
n of Columbus, 
his address Cohen pointed out 
popular vote had shown that 
people in New York and in 
sachusetts were opposed to Sun- 
closing and censorship, and 
d that similar moves to gauge 
> public opinion be started. It 
then Mrs. Gurwell spoke and 
sd her sentiments, 
ax Stern delivered a talk that was 
auded generously. He said that 
idependent exhibitor organization 
necessary to fight a trustification 
le business, which he felt was in- 
ible. To substantiate his con- 
ons on the trust idea, he pointed 
t he thought was conclusive proof 
his intention on the part of cer- 
distributors. 

:fore the meeting adjourns, it is 
:cted action of some sort will 
aken so far as the Theater Own- 
Dist. Corp. is concerned. When 
en explained what this company 
ned, his remarks were received 

approbation, 
i all likelihood, Smith will be 
lected president without any op- 
tion. His leadership of the Ohio 
is understood to be satisfactory 
he majority of members. Other 
ikers at the dinner were Major 
es J. Thomas of Columbus; H. 
Ritchey, of the Michigan M. P. T. 
and C. C. Pettijohn, general 
lsel of the Hays organization. 

Desmond in New "U" Serial 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
os Angeles — With William Des- 
id as star, Universal will produce 
rial, based on American business 
Is. Robert F. Hill will direct, 
cast will include Esther Ralston, 
ris Sargent, George Nichols, 
rge Webb, Harry DeVere and 
Harmon. 



May Sell Studio 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Jacksonville, Fla. — It is understood 
that the Klutho studio will shortly be 
placed on the market. 



New House for Paterson 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Paterson, N. J. — The Alexander 
Hamilton Theater Corp. will spend 
$150,000 on a new theater to be built 
at Church and Market Sts. 



In New Offices 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
St. Louis — The Motion Picture 
Exhibitors League of St. Louis and 
Eastern Missouri has moved into 
new headquarters at 3308 Olive St. 



Universal Slogan 

Universal has adopted as a slogan 
"Universal pictures — the Pleasure is 
Yours." George Greenberg, 320 W. 
102nd St., received a check for the 
slogan. 



Northwest Shipments Held Up 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Seattle — Film shipments have been 
seriously delayed in the outlying dis- 
tricts of Washington and Oregon, 
due to serious flood conditions. 



Newspaper Opinions 

"The Marriage Chance" — Amer. 
Releas. — Cameo 

TRIBUNE— The story is terrible, but the 

direction is amusing. * * * 

MORNING TELEGRAPH—* * * Freak 
film conceived and executed by Hampton 
Del Ruth. In fact, such a mixture that 
you've a little bit of everything and not much 
of anything. 

AMERICAN— The acting is hopeful, and 
the possibilities for either burlesque, melo- 
drama or comedy — separately — are good, 
but, as a coherent feature play, it should 
have been released as a disconnected two- 
reel serial. 

MORNING WORLD—* * * A gorgeous 
light comedy picture. * * * "The Marriage 
Chance" is an audacious, extraordinary play 
which whizzes on with the pace of a Kan- 
sas tornado. Nor is it any less incorrigible. 
Anything is likely to happen in it. 

MAIL — It is a curious and extraordinary 
mixture of broad comedy, drama and sheer 
melodrama, so lacking in continuity as to be 
not a little confusing. 

GLOBE—* * * "The Marriage Chance" 
is not such a bad product on the film mart. 
It has a great deal of comedy and side show, 
which are excellent in themselves, and the 
dream, to those Freudinally minded, offers 
food for reflection. A good cast helps this 
sketch immensely. 



Using "Featurettes" in Canada 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Toronto — First National offices 
are using a "featurette," made up of 
trailers of their big pictures, which 
exhibitors are being shown prior to 
buying film. They havt been in use 
about a year. 



Kelly Writing Meighan Script 
Anthony Paul Kelly has been en- 
gaged to write the continuity for 
"White Heat," in which Tom Meig- 
han will star after completion of 
"The Ne'er-Do-Well." Production in 
the East. 



EXHIBITORS 
EVERYWHERE 
ARE DELIGHTED 
WITH 

ONLY A _ 



"Robin Hood" in 14th Week 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Hollywood — Douglas Fairbanks' 
"Robin Hood" is in its 14th wrek at 
Grauman's Egyptian theater. 



NEGATIVE FOR SALE 

High-class, new 5-reel Ameri- 
can made out-door feature. 
Great bargain for quick action. 
Box S-2 c/o Film Daily. 



CHROMOS TRADING CO. 
1123 Broadway 

Suite 616 'Phone Chelae* 8264 

CASH AVAILABLE 
IMMEDIATELY FOR 
RELIABLE 
PROPOSITIONS 

Investigate ! 



TITLES 



NEGATIVE 
POSITIVE 
Incl. CARDS 

15 CENTS PER FOOT 

24 Hour Service if necessary 

SIMPLEX TITLE SHOP 

220 W. 42d Street Bryant 0985 



E. K. LINCOLN MARTHA MANSFIELD 

Mrs. RUDOLPH VALENTINO JOE STRIKER W. H. TOOKER 



IN 



"THE WOMAN IN CHAINS" 

By Edward Owings Towne 

NOW READY FOR RE VIEW 

DENMAN THOMPSONS 

"SUNSHINE OF PARADISE ALLEY" 

A GREAT AUTHOR A GREAT PLAY 

WILL BE THE SECOND RELEASE OF 

AMALGAMATED EXCHANGES OF AMERICA 

1540 BROADWAY - - NEW YORK 
Foreign Rights Controlled by The Export and Import Film Co., Inc., 729 7th Ave., New York City 



THE 



-^g^ 



DAILY 



Thursday, January 18, 19: 



Metropolitan Pictures Move 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Detroit — Metropolitan Pictures have 
moved from 47 E. Elizabeth St., to 
the Film Building. 



Carleton King in Town 
Carleton King, head of the pro- 
duction unit hearing his name, arrived 
Here from Los Angeles yesterday to 
arrange release of three two-reel 
rural comedies in which he is starred. 



Clift Making "Out to Win" 

(.Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

London — Denison Clift is now at 

work on "Out to Win" for Ideal 

Films, Ltd. When he finishes it, he 

will return to the States. 



Burr Travesty on "Hamlet" 

Charles C. Burr has produced a 
two reel travesty on "Hamlet," with 
Charles Murray. Joe Hart, Dorothy 
Allen and Felix Adler, which will be 
released by Hodkinson. 



Mumper Practicing Law 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Hewlings Mumper, 
formerly associated with the Ben B. 
Hampton Prod., has returned to the 
practice of law, having formed a 
partnership with Judge Victor E. 
Shaw. Offices in the Title Bldg. 



Hillyer Directing 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Lambert Hillyer has 
started work on "Temporary Mar- 
riage" for Sacramento Pictures. The 
cast includes Mildred Davis, Tully 
Marshall, Kenneth Harlan, Maud 
George, Mrytle Stedman and Stuart 
Holmes. 



Jupiter Closes Big Deal 
Jupiter Films which recently ac- 
quired the Vitagraph output for a 
number of South American countries 
has sold the product to the Chilean 
Cinema Corp. for Chile. Peru, Bolivia 
and Ecuador. Six serials, 55 features 
and 56 two reel comedies are involved 
the footage totaling close on to 1,000,- 
000 feet. 



Favorite-Kunsky Deal 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Detroit — Favorite Films have 
closed a deal with John H. Kunsky, 
whereby Favorite will handle the 
future distribution of all productions 
formerly distributed by the First Na- 
tional Film Exchange of Mich., prior 
to the formation of Assoc. First Na- 
tional Exchanges. The deal involves 
34 productions. 



Conklin on Trip 
F. G. Conklin, special representa- 
tive of Hope Hampton Prod., left 
yesterday on a trip through the South 
and West. 



Nolan Handling Lichtman Product 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Denver— Harry Nolan has replaced 
Mountain States Film Attractions as 
Lichtman distributor in the Denver 
and Salt Lake territory. 



Shooker Made Exchange Head 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Seattle — B. M. Shooker has been 
appointed general manager of Arrow 
exchanges in Seattle, Denver and 
Salt Lake, succeeding Charles R. 
Gilmore. resigned. Manager Hugh 
Rennie of the Seattle exchange, has 
resigned. His successor has not yet 
been named. 



Jacobson Suit Discontinued 

Supreme Court Justice Tierney has 
signed an order discontinuing the suit 
of Louis Jacobson against Kempson 
Pictures Corp. because the case has 
been settled. 



Marvin D. Cohen, who has been 
selling for the Seattle Film Ex- 
change, has left to open offices for 
the Reelboard, Daylight M. P. Sales 
Service. 



Another New Company 

Olivette Thomas-Seel has arrived 
from Europe. She says she intends 
forming her own producing company. 
Claims to have been working in Ger- 
man studios for the past two years. 



Judgment Filed 

In a suit of David Rodman against 
the Signet Films a default judgment 
for $2,300 was filed in the City Court. 
The complaint alleged that the de- 
fendant sold Rodman the New York 
State rights to "Mother. I Need You" 
and then refused to furnish the film, 
causing $2,000 damages. 



Joint Run in Four Houses 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Cleveland — "The Streets of New 
York," released in Ohio through 
Progress Pictures, has been booked 
for a day and date run at Loew's 
Metropolitan, Alhambra, Liberty and 
Mall theaters, beginning Jan. 18th. 



Truart Releases 

Truart has acquired the following, 
for state right distribution: 

"Women Men Marry"; "Patsy"; 
"Riders of the Range"; "The Prairie 
Mystery"; "Pirates of the Plains"; 
"A Western Musketeer," and a series 
of 12 short reel Burlingham Travel 
Adventures. 



Change Title of Bosworth Film 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — The title of "The 
Law of the Sea," starring Hobart 
Bosworth for Anchor, has been 
changed to "The Man Alone." The 
production has been sold to Apollo 
Exchange, Inc., for Greater New 
York and Northern New Jersey. 



Albert James Making Feature 

Albert James Prod, has started 
work on a picture with Gardner 
James, Martha Mansfield and Ed- 
mund Breese in the cast. George 
Sargent is directing at the Tec-Art 
studio from a script by Lewis Allen 
Browne. It is understood Clark- 
Cornelius will distribute. 



Lose Suit 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — W. Bradley Ward 
and Delbert L. Davis lost a suit for 
$7,950 against Clermont Photoplays 
for yearly contract wages at the rate 
of $75 a week for Ward as assistant 
director and $150 a week for Davis 
as cinematographer. 



Short 
Stuff 



The value of the short subject to 
your program. 

How to build a program through 
the use of short stuff. 

How well known exhibitors use 
short subjects to advantage. 

"Fillers" at a price vs. real short 
subjects of material value. 



Ul 



'How I pick my short subjects" 
by important Broadway managers. 

The news reel and its audience 
value. 

Just a few of the ideas that will 
be presented in the forthcoming 
Short Stuff issue of THE FILM 
DAILY, out Sunday, February 19. 

An unusual "buy" for the pro- 
ducer and distributor of short sub- 
jects. 



THE 



ursday, January 18, 1923 



mm 



DAILY 



Earnings Held Up 

(Continued from Page 1) 
is pointed out that the fact that 
ious Players had arranged with 
K. Lynch to actively take over 
iselves the management of the 
thern Enterprises, Inc., is in it- 
a very definite indication that' 
company feels it can operate the 
e chain on a successful financial 
s, after Lynch's interest had 
i taken care of. When the annual 
;ment appears, one of the in- 
sting angles will probably be the 
ination of the $1,000,000 note held 
the name of the Amusement 
ince Corp., as a result of the con- 
mation of the Lynch deal. Fam- 
Players officials scout the reports 
taring in the Evening Post that 
1922 statement would prove un- 
rable,-and that a new stock issue 
Id be necessary for financing pur- 
:s. 

was recalled that every year 
i,000 in preferred stock is retired 
amortization purposes, and the 
t was made that any considera- 
of comparative financial state- 
ts must be made with that fact 
lind. 



Badger Loaned By S-L 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Clarence G. Badger 
has been only loaned to Goldwyn by 
Sawyer and Lubin to direct "Red 

Lights," which Marshall Neilan was 
originally slated to direct. On the 
completion of this, Badger will re- 
turn to S-L to direct a production 
at the Metro studios in Hollywood, 
after the completion of which S-L 
Prod, will be made in the studio in 
San Diego. 



Changes at F. P. Canadian Houses 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Toronto — Ray H. Leason has been 
appointed general supervisor of 
Famous Players theaters in Manitoba 
and Northern Ontario, with head- 
quarters at the Capitol, Winnipeg. 
He will also have charge of the 
Province, Winnipeg, recently ac- 
quired, and of theaters at Fort Wil- 
liam and Port Arthur. John T. 
Fiddes. owner of theaters in Mon- 
treal, has been appointed manager 
of the Capitol, Winnipeg. H. M. 
Thomas returns to Montreal to re- 
sume charge of the Capitol there. 



/ve Are Ready to Pay CASH 

FOR PRODUCTIONS OF MERIT 
'or NEW YORK OTV and STATE & NORTHERN NEW JERSEY 

The Bigger They Com&i- The Better We Like Them. 
REiSTOWiST PICTURES; INC. 

729- SEVENTH AVE. Phone BRYANT 4-754-- 6174- 



Reproductive quality enables the sensitive 
emulsion to correctly portray every step of 
gradation from highest light to deepest 
shadow. 

EASTMAN 
POSITIVE FILM 

faithfully reproduces every tone of the 
negative. It carries the quality through 
to the screen. 



Eastman Film, both regular and tinted base — 
now available in nine colors, is identified through- 
out its length by the words "Eastman" "Kodak" 
stenciled in black letters in the transparent margin. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



/ 



BIG BUSINESS 

at the Capitol this week with 

"GIMME!'' 

Rupert Hughes' latest Goldwyn Picture 

and the response of the public 
and critics to this uproarious 
domestic comedy proves that 
we have 

A GREAT BOX OFFICE ATTRACTION 



THE 



■<2^ 



DAILY 



Thursday, January 18, 1923 



Two Problems 

Radio and Basketball Giving Small 

Town Exhibitors Trouble 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Crookston. Minn. — C. L. Hiller, 
New Grand, writing to Theodore 
I lavs, of Finklestein & Ruben, says 
the radio and basketball are knock- 
ing blazes out of business. In part 
he writes: 

"I believe that it is almost time 
to get out of the picture business, 
although I don't know what else to 
do. But it is a sure thing that 
people are losing their interest in 
pictures. It's about time that the big 
picture men cut out the 90 per cent 
bull and the 10 per cent picture and 
get down to giving the public some- 
thing for their money. Good pictures 
still have a drawing power, but the 
trouble is there is too much Gold 
Leaf publicity spent on pictures, and 
then when you see them they are 
disappointing." 



Columbus, Ind. — Frank Rembusch, 
who operates two houses here, says 
the craze over basketball in this sec- 
tion of the country has cut receipts 
25 per cent. 



May Work in West 
According to Louis Lee Arms, 
American representative of Graham- 
Wilcox Prod., "Chu Chin Chow" 
which the company has purchased 
may be made in Hollywood. When 
Charles Wilcox arrives the end of the 
month from London, he will bring 
with him two Mae Marsh subjects, 
"Flames of Passion" and "Paddy-the- 
Next-Best-Thing." 



In the Courts 

A default judgment for $2,555 was 
filed in the Supreme Court in a suit 
of the Arrow Film Corp. against 
Llewellyn H. Allen of 130 West 46th 
St. on four trade acceptances. 



In the suit of Eugene Spitz against 
Ivan Abramson and Graphic Films 
over "Mother Eternal," Supreme 
Court Justice Tierney signed an order 
directing the Garfield National Bank 
to pay $1,482 out of a fund of more 
than $2,000 on hand, to Abramsou for 
payments made and bills due. The 
income from the film is being deposit- 
ed in the bank. 



In the suit of Doubleday Page & 
Co. against Vitagraph for the can- 
cellation of the contract to make films 
of the O. Henry stories, ou the 
ground that Vitagraph is in default, 
Supreme Court Justice Platzek has 
decided against Vitagraph. He also 
denies Vitagraph's plea for an in- 
junction restraining the publishers 
from contracting with another produ- 
cing company for the filming of the 
stories. 



A default judgment for $2,062 has 
been filed in the Supreme Court 
against Francis X. Bushman in favor 
of Suzanne Devoyod of the Comedie 
Francaise in Paris. She alleged that 
she sent $3,120 to Bushman on his 
agreement to come to Paris and take 
part in a film she was making, but he 
failed to come and returned only 



Important Decision 

'Continued from Patef ' 

ancelled the contract. However, it is claim- 
ed, before the cancellation Gillespie's ohta ned 
from Select positive prints on their contract 
for Brazil and in violation of their contract 
shipped those positive prints to Chile and 
Argentine where they came into possession 
of CinematoKrafica Sud Americana who ex- 
hibited the same in that territory. In the 
meant me and after the cancellation of the 
contract with Cinematografica Sud Americana, 
it appears Select sold to Max Glucksmann the 
rights to exhibit the same p'ctures in Ar- 
gentine and Chile which rights Cinematog- 
rafica Sud Americana previously had. When 
Glucksmann found that the pictures which he 
had purchased from Select were being ex- 
hibited by others an investigation was made 
by him through his office here in New York 
and, he claims, these facts were unearthed, 
namely : that Gillespie Bros, had shipped un- 
authorized copies into Glucksmann's terri- 
tory. 

In June. 1920, an action was begun by 
Glucksmann against Gillespie Bros. The case 
was tried by Allan Deutsch, of Rosett & 
Deutsch. The defendants were represented by 
Satterlee, Canfield & Stone. 

Louis Brock of the Schenck organization 
acted as an expert for Glucksmann. 



$1,450 of the money. A letter from 
Bushman to the plaintiff, filed with 
the papers explained that the Collec- 
tor of Internal Revenue wouldn't let 
him leave the United States until he 
had paid $10,000 back taxes, and he 
couldn't raise the money because his 
funds were tied up in alimony pro- 
ceedings. 



The estate of Harold A. Lockwood, 
who died Oct. 19, 1918, has been ap- 
praised at $32,552, which is divided 
equally among his mother, his son, 
Harold, and Gladys W. Lyle of Los 
Angeles. He had $22,°17 in cash and 
$4,865 in Liberty bonds. 



COM/NC/ 



3*° OF THE 
6 BOX OFFICE 
WINNERS 



4Jjhtctttre (Etfrpurattnu 

RESOURCES - $5,000,000 

Knickerbocker Building 
Broadway at 42nd Street, N. T. City 



Now at 203-5 W. 40th St. 

In our OWN LABORATORY 

and STUDIO 

ERNEST STERN 

The Titleman 
Phones Penn. 2373-2374 



OUR TRADE MARK AS WELL AS YOURS 

S P F T T SI 

INDEPENDENCE and INTEGRITY 



TWELVE 5 PART FEATURES 



INDEPENDENT 
^ PICTURES A 



Pictures of Punch, Power 

and Pulchritude 

Released one a month through 

Independent Exchanges 




THE FIRST SIX RELEASES 

Flames of Passion 

( See any Trade Paper Rtview) 

The Power Divine 

The Devil's Partner 

The Way of the Transgressor 

The Clean Up 

The Valley of Lost Souls 



Productions Built and Sold to maintain the exchange, the theatre 

and ourselves in business. 

Independent Pictures Corporation 

JESSE J GOLDBURG, President 
1540 Broadway, New York Telephone Bryant 3993 



Address 



sTHE 

7Ao BRADSTREET 
of FILMDOM 





jfomoomii 
Authority 



ef. XXIII No. 18 



Friday, January 19, 1923 



Price 5 Cents 



Ohio Receptive 

eater Owners Dist. Corp. Gets 
Cordial Reception at Columbus 
Convention — Smith Re-elected 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
lolumbus, O. — Cordial reception 
s tendered to the officers of the 
eater Owners Dist. Corp. by the 
egates attending the state conven- 
n of the M. P. T. O. of Ohio at 
: final session in Hotel C ittenden. 
illiam A. True, president of this 
w distributing organization ex- 
lined its purposes and indicated t'. e 
Dgress already made. Other 
makers on the distribution proposi- 
n were W. D. Burford, of Chicago, 
d Harry Davis of Pittsburgh. 
Regional directors and members of 
: zone committees were selected 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Deneker a Hit 

yes the A. M. P. A. Some Point~~s 
on Theater Operation — Some 
Striking One-Sheets 

Zlem Deneker, the famous ex- 
•itor from Pneumonia, Nev., de- 
ered a lengthy address yesterday 
the A. M. P. A. weekly luncheon 
the Boulevard. 

31em came all the way from his 
itropolis in the West to address 
: advertising men and tell them 
w he put over his now famous 
cuit of theaters. Mr. Deneker 
ide a decided impression. His 
:ute observations on film methods, 
d his keen insight into the evils, 
eged and otherwise, existent in the 
lustry met with spontaneous ap- 
luse. Scattered around the dining 
om were the home-brewed one- 
eets concocted by Clem. They 
ought many laughs. Clem said: 

"Fellow moving picture people, I certainly 
l glad to be here today because I got a 
:ssage from the Exhibitors of the Almost 
ir West for you. 

His String 

"I know how busy you people are and I 
it going to try to mention all the corn- 
lints I could mention if I wanted to get 
'ty or personal. I aint talking as an 
hibitor with one theater. I got five thea- 
•s and a depot. 

"I got the Elite at Pneumonia, the Smells- 
d at Split Lip, the Fivecentodean at Lep- 
sy, the Garageo at Broken Sock and the 
? new Union Pacific meeting rooms at 
mper, Nevada. So you see you are listen- 
f to a circuit owner. My wife is the 
:asurer and secretary and I am the man- 
er. 

"We exhibitors have got troubles. 
'You producers don't realize it for you 
' around New York and believe what your 
ess agents tell you about your pictures 
ing great. But you can't believe your 
(Continued on Page 4) 

Short Stuff Number Feb. 19 
Best kind of an ad buy. 




Elmer Clifton's stupendous production of "the golden days of whaling," 
as Lawrence Reid of the Motion Pi-.ture News described "DOWN TO 
THE SEA IN SHIPS" in his enthusiastic review, will prove one of 
the greatest money makers you have had the opportunity of booking for a 
long time. Ifs a Hodkinson Picture. — Advt. 



Joe Keller Here 

Joe Keller, sales representative of 
United Artists in Cincinnati, is in 
town. 



Sada Cowan Joins Lasky 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles- — Sada Cowan has 
been added to the Paramount scen- 
ario staff on contract. 



Dillon Off For Coast 

Edward Dillon is en route to the 
coast to make "Broadway Gold" for 
Truart. 



"Trilby" Through 1st Nat'l 
(Special to THE FILM DATLY) 

Los Angeles — In an advertisement 
over his signature in the Mid-winter 
edition of the Times, Richard Wal- 
ton Tully states that "Trilby" will 
be released through First National. 



Interested in "Legit" Merger 

Film men evidenced considerable 
interest over the contemplated book- 
ing arrangement between A. L. Er- 
langer and the Shuberts in the legit- 
imate field. 



Creswell in the South 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Atlanta — Fred Creswell will as- 
sume supervision over the five ex- 
changes taken over by Famous Play- 
ers under the Lynch deal. He suc- 
ceeds L. L. Dent, who will probably 
be connected with the theater organ- 
ization. 



Short Stuff! How? Why? What? 
The answer: Film Daily Feb. 19 



Lynch Plans Another Trip 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Atlanta — The Weekly Film Review 
reports that S. A. Lynch plans an- 
other trip abroad, and that he will 
sail from New York early next week. 



Warners Don't Seek Tie-up 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Warner Bros. 
Bros, authorize the statement that 
they are not interested in any sort 
of a merger or affiliation with any 
other company in the business. A 
local report linked the name of James 
Young with the Warners, but there 
is nothing to it. 



Enterprise Dist. Sold 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Atlanta— The S. A. Lynch Enter- 
prises have sold the Enterprise Dist. 
Corp. to William K. Jenkins and John 
W. Quillian who intend operating the 
various exchanges themselves. En- 
terprise has been conducted as an in- 
dependent distributor by Lynch with 
offices in Atlanta, Charlotte. New Or- 
leans. Oklahoma City, Dallas, Omaha 
and Kansas City. 



Sid Chaplin to Edit 

Engaged by Tri-Stone to Prepare 

Keystone Series for State 

Right Distribution 

Negotiations were closed by wire 
yesterday whereby Sidney Chaplin 
will edit the first series of Keystone 
comedies for release to state right 
exchanges through the newly-formed 
Tri-Stone Pictures, Inc. 

Chaplin left for the coast on Mon- 
day, following conferences wi*h 
Oscar A. Price who with Harry E. 
Aitken, formed Tri-Stone. The sub- 
jects will be sent to Chaplin at once, 
and it is possible that work will be 
carried on at Charlie's studio in 
Hollywood. Messrs. Price and 
Aitken are of the opinion that Sid 
Chaplin will prove valuable to them 
in re-editing the Keystone revivals 
in view of his extensive knowledge 
of comedy values. 



Goldwyn Returns 

Sam Goldwyn returned from the 
coast yesterday. He is at the Am- 
bassador. 



Wallace Reid Dead 

(Special to THE FILM DATLY) 
Los Angeles — Wallace Reid died in 
a private sanitarium yesterday. 

Film Players' Ball Tonight 
The Film Players' Club. Inc.. will 
hold a ball at Terrace Garden to- 
night as a move to secure funds to 
build a clubhouse. 



Tel! the waiting world in 
Short Stuff Edition Feb 19 



Fox To Take Over Central? 

It is reported that Fox will take 
over the Central theater for first- 
runs. John Zanft, of the Fox 
offices, is out of town and in his 
absence no comment would be made 
there. No one at the Shubert offices 
could be reached for a statement. 



"U" Forms Sales Cabinet 
Universal has reorganized its sales 
plans so that control will be vested in 
a sales cabinet composed of Art 
Schmidt and four assistants. The 
latter will have complete charge in 
their territories and will have power 
to approve contracts without submit- 
ting them to the home office. Meet- 
ings will be held four times a year. 

The company yesterday announced 
a new series of nine features to be 
known as Capitol features. They will 
be "The Prisoner." "The Rolted 
Door," "Gossip " "The Midnight 
Guest." "Single Handed." "His Good 
Name." "Nobodv's Bride." "Trimmed 
in Scarlet" and a Gibson feature, 
name undetermined. 

Advertise! Advertise! 
All short stuff Feb. 19 



an 



THE 




Vol. XXIII No. 18 Friday, Jan. 19, 1923 Price 5 Cents 

Copyright 1923, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y„ by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Toseph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 
J W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00 ; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FTLM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York. 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 
Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Aye., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Cliehy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau, Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
vakia), Wenzelsplatz. 

Quotations 

High Low Close Sales 

East. Kod. 9SJ4 93% 95 1,000 

F. P.-L. .. 853^ 84 8534 3,000 

do pfd Not quoted 

Goldwyn .. 5j4 5% 5V 8 900 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's ... 1854 18^ 18^4 1,500 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 

In the Courts 

A default judgment for $1,745 has 
been filed in the Supreme Court 
against the Nickroll Amusement Co. 
and Max Ginsberg on notes. 

City Court Justice Hartman has 
dismissed a suit of Frederick H. Lin- 
coln against the Erbograph Co. and 
William A. Jamieson for $800 because 
he failed to prosecute it. He sued on 
the ground that the defendants con- 
verted to their own use five reels of 
Edison Educational films. 

Buys "Captain of Souls" 

Edgar Wallace's "Captain of Souls" 
has been purchased for production by 
Goldwyn. 

After Exteriors 
T. B. Buffum, location man for 
Atlantic Features, leaves for the West 
Indies tomorrow to secure locations 
for the company's next feature. Jack 
Dillon will direct for Arrow release. 




ART TITLES 

LOUIS MEYER 

Craftsmen Film Lab. 
251 West 19th St. 
Wttkfau 7260-7461 



-a&n 



BHWJUH.Il" ?r~* 



DAILV 



Friday, January 19, 192: 



Guts and Flashes 

1>e title of "The Curse of Drink" 
has been changed to "The Curse." 



D. W. Griffith will make his 
headquarters at the Brunton studio, 
Miami, when he shoots exteriors for 
"The White Rose." 



Earlier in the week, Ralph Hayes 
of the M. P. P. D. A., delivered an 
address before the National Ass'n of 
Book Publishers at the Yale Club. 



Through Charles Walton, Lucille 
La Verne and Jane Thomas have been 
engaged for D. W, Griffith's "The 
White Rose," now in production. 



Hodkinson Has Kaiser Film 

Hodkinson will release "The Ex- 
Kaiser in Exile" shortly. The picture 
is said by the company to be the 
first of William in exile at Doom. 



"French Doll" Next 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Mae Murray's next 
picture will be "The French Doll," 
which is expected to be in production 
for about three months. 



Sliter on Exchange Trip 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Albany — Fred G. Sliter field man- 
ager for First National, stopped off 
long enough to supervise the con- 
struction of a home that he is build- 
ing, and then proceeded west on a 
tour of exchanges. 



Film Revival Tonight 

There will be a revival of a num- 
ber of old films at a special showing 
at the Selwyn tonight in order to 
sl-'ow how the industry has advanced. 
Among the pictures shown will be 
"The Great Train Robbery," a Pick- 
ford release, various strips of colored 
films, and then a new Teleview 
demonstration. 



Complains of Bad Prints 

Frank Rembusch, in a letter to 
this office, encloses a letter sent to 
him by Frank Horn, manager of the 
American theater at Columbus, Ind., 
embodying a complaint against the 
condition of the prints sent to the 
American. Horn says not only were 
hundreds of feet missing, but the 
titles were so short and the film 
so rainy that the entire subject was 
valueless. 



SIMPLEX TITLE SHOP 

220 W. 42nd St. 
Anr.,?unces the closing of a contract 
giv.i.g it exclusive sales rights on the 

FAMOUS STONE LIBRARY 
Over two million feet of selected shots 
as far back as 1897, negative and posi- 
tive, are now made available for your 
requirements. 

Phone Bryant 0984-0985 



WANTED IMMEDIATELY 

Bell and Howell Camera 170 Degree 

Shutter. For Cash. 

FARINA and OGLE 

Art Titles 

430 Claremont Parkway 

Phone Bingham 2100 



KLUTHO STUDIO IN FLORIDA 
FOR SALE 

Cooper-Hewitts hard lights and 
laboratory located on valuable 
ground in heart of city. Cost 
$65,000. Will sell at a sacrifice. 
Reasonable amount in cash bal- 
ance on time. 
Will be'dismantled in 30 days if not sold 

H. J. Klutho, Owner 
Room 401 St. James Building 

Jacksonville, Florida. 
No coal needed, no snow and ice. 
Cheapest electric juice in the 
Country only 2 cents a kilowatt. 



Duncan Signs With "U" 
William Duncan and Edith Joh 
son signed a contract with Univers 
yesterday to star in serials. Th< 
leave for the coast in a few days 
finish the unexpired term of the 
Vitagraph contract. 



NEGATIVE FOR SALE 

High-class, new 5-reel Ameri- 
can made out-door feature. 
Great bargain for quick action. 
Box S-2 c/o Film Daily. 



Internationa/ iDisfribu/e/i of 
MOTION ■PICTURES 



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If You Were Offered 
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What would you do? We are offering you a Golden Opportunity . 

THE PREFERRED 8. 

Pictures with 100 per cent box office value, now booking. Here they are: 



RICH MEN'S WIVES 

Gasnier 

THE HERO 

Gasnier 

ARE YOU A FAILURE? 

Tom Forman 

SHADOWS 

Tom Forman 



Get them NOW and cash in on your crowds. 

Produced by 

Preferred Pictures 

B. P. Schulberg, President. 



THORNS AND ORANGE BLOSSOMS 

Gasnier 

POOR MEN'S WIVES 
Gasnier 

THE GIRL WHO CAME BACK 

Tom Forman 

APRIL SHOWERS 

Tom Forman 



Ah LICHTMAN 

President Al Lichtman Corporation, 
1650 Broadway , New York. 




Friday, January 19, 1923 



Deneker a Hit 

(Continued from Page 1) 
ess agents any more than we can use the 
uff they send us to advertise. 
"While I aint got no newspapers in any 

my towns, I am glad of it. I couldn't 
t any of the trash sent me into them so that 

wont kick on the publicity, but the big 
tergrafs are terrible. 

"When that Universal salesman came 
rough Pneumonia and got me to sell my 
neral merchandising store, he only told me 
iw rich Marcus Loew was and how much 
aney W'"'am Fox had. He didn't tell me 
out the million guys that didn't have a 
ckel. Well, I bought the Elite theater out 

Pneumonia and turned it from a stable 
to a temple of movies and changed the 
lole interior. That is, I took out the stalls, 
didn't need them, there was too many in 
e business as it was so I boarded up the 
:d boxes and mangers and put in chairs. I 
ing paper bells from the ceiling — in fact I 
ent a lot of money on improvement and 
ened with Pathe weekly, because I heard it 
lyed the Strand for fifty-two weeks. Well 
advertised heavy. I put out two one sheets 
at I painted myself. And fixed up my 
bby. That is I put the other one sheet 
Ere. 

"Well I packed the house. It was a 
jnderful opening. I got eighty-one seats 

the theater and I sold eighty tickets. 
y wife sat in the other seat so I could say 
ery seat was sold out. Well, imagine how 
ugh I felt when the print gets in and I 
id its a one reeler and no drama in it. 
"The audience went away sore as hell. 
"I made a speech and said that the other 
re spools must a got lost in the express 
ice, and that seemed to satisfy the cus- 
mers for I heard one of them say that if 
c other spools was like the one they saw 
ank God they was lost. 

What the Mail Brought 

"Well, the news gets spread around the 
Sees that a live guy was in the business at 
leumonia and pretty soon salesmen started 

come in and talk about mail. I got more 
lil myself in one week than the Pneumonia 
st office ever handled in two years before, 
got so many press sheets I started to post 
em up in the lobby, then inside the theater 
and the people that came to see the picture 
ed to walk around the room and read them. 
ell when I finds that the customers is 
tting a lot of laughs out of the press 
oks, why I started only posting ten or 
elve a week at that rate 1 got enough to 
it me a couple years. You'd be surprised 
w good the jokes go. 

"Well, to get back to my running the thea- 
:, a feller from Famous Players came in 
d hearing that an exhibitor named Glick- 
in up in Detroit was suing them for their 
:tures I figures they must be pur'ty good, 

I did business with him. He showed me a 
t of 41 pictures, the years output he called 
and suggested some of them for me. He 
Id me that I would make a mistake showing 
eir pictures every week in the year and 
ggested that I leave the week before Xmas 
en for First National pictures. That if I 
In't do well that week with First National, 
could take all my stuff from him the next 
ar. Well I let him pick out ten pictures 

start with, I git the first one the next 
Dnth, after the Rialto theater, its called 
listress of the World." Then I get Caruso 

two pictures, Fred Stone the comical in 
o pictures and the salesman said that if I 
inted something to fill in he would give me 

Fatty Arbuckles but that if I was wise 
said I would not advertise these but sur- 

ise the customers. I forget the others but 
6y come right from Broadway to Pneu- 
}nia. 

"I had a couple of bad experiences with pic- 
res, too. 

"I rented a film from an independent sales- 
in called "The Flour of Minneapolis" and 
suggested a tie-up with the Washburn 
osby Company, and I wrote them. Well, 
ey sent me a lot of liftergrafs. Here's one. 
ell, I don't know what was wrong but I 
in't have one paid admission. Later I 
und every one sayin' eventually — not now. 

Real Exploitation 

"That's the last publicity I used that was 
at to me. I played a picture called "The 
Sherman's Child" and tied up with the 
mtral Market. It was the biggest night I 
d. I bought forty herrings for two cents 
piece, they were a little old and a can of 
uerdines. I gave a herring to each grown 

1 adult and a sauerdine to each child. The 
:ture wasn't so good but the fish kept the 



peoples minds off it and I had good reviews 
from the audience. 

"Course I don't propose to tell you all 
how to make pictures, that's your business ; 
but I think I can talk on publicity and the 
kind of junk we get to work with. 

"I wouldn't want to be quoted to your 
publicity men for I dont know when one of 
them might be sent out to help me put a 
picture over, but we sure get the bad end of 
it every time we fall for press stuff and pay 
for it. I think the stuff is lousy. Of course 
if you fellows dont know what lousy means, 
I will tell you — its that a picture is a classic 
on Broadway, a masterpiece in Chicago, a 
knockout at Des Moines and then we get 
behind it and starve to death. 

"Well, I got stuck on a superfeature that 
was put over by a guy named Arthur Leslie 
whose writing his memorial for the movie 
weekly and called "The Truth Ar; ut Blades" 
and after hearing his stuff tied up with the 
local drug store and made a big display in the 
window of Gillette safety razor blades, had 
signs put up in the part about blades of 
grass — spent almost $3 and figured I'd play 
to capacity, which is 81 people. I paid Vita- 
graph $5 for first run — being the only thea- 
ter in town, and am, as I said, countin' on 
capacity, when what happened? Five of the 
people in town is sick in bed, without 
me knowin' it, Ike Hardscrabble gets run 
over on a coal tipple and his wife is took 
down with nervousness, for fear he aint going 
to die, being as she would collect insurance, 
five people who is visiting from Excema has a 
fight with the people they're visiting — bingo, 
my gross receipts is all shot to hell and I 
lose 80 cents on the night. 

"Now that's why programme pictures is 
better for us small circuit owners than big 
superpictures like Vitagraph turns out. 

Saturday Shows 

"Of course, I make dough sometimes. 
This here now Selznick give me a good break. 
He advertised that for every World film 
feature we booked he would give us one for 
nothing and I fell for it. I gets busy and 
ties up for 10 features for Wednesday nights — 
my middle of the week show which I am sup- 
posed to pay $2 for — and then I gets ten 
Saturday night shows for nothing — so after 
the contract is signed, I find that summer's 
come on and I only play the Saturday night 
shows which I got free gratis — and I played 
eight of them before the exchange is hep — 
and made a little money, so that now I am 
sure that Selznick is about the only friend 
who makes money for exhibitors. 

"Well, I dont want to take up too much 
time, but there's one instance where I got 
the bad end of it. That was when I bought 
the new house at Elephantaisis. I didn't 
know when I bought it that the roof leaked 
and that when it rained I couldn't sit no 
people in the early rows, that is the first seven 
rows in front. There was nine rows al- 
together on the first floor — and there wasn't 
no balcony. Well, I rents a picture from 
Metro and pays $2.50 for it for first run. 
The night I plays it, it starts in raining like 
hell- — and only 20 people could come in, as 
the whole early part of the house is drippin' — 
now, there's the idea — should I git a kick back 
from Metro or must I hafent to pay the 
whole two fifty. That's one of the reasons 
of my trip east here, besides coming to give 
any ideas I got on how to put it over. I 
want to say also that I enjoy reading the cata- 
logues like the Moving Picture News and 
World and Exhibitors Herald and get a lot 
of laughs out of them for we dont git no 
Sunday papers out our way till Thursday, if 
they arrives. 

"I guess I owe my being famous to Dan- 
nenbergs catalogue, for I been swamped with 
letters since my first letter was run in that 
catalogue. And besides that, I grabbed four 
other theaters and a depot since I was first 
published. 

Wants His Shows 

"I came to New York to get about 30 
feature supers to run me a couple of months, 
as I can't depend on my show gettin' in, 
in time, I missed three holidays Xmas week. 
And one show I missed when I was to play 
"Dead or Alive" and spent more'n a dollar 
tie-ing up with a fertilizer company to 
spread fertilizer all over the street in front of 
the theater and going out and renting a 
skunk to turn loose in the lobby. The show 
didn't get in and I was sunk for six bucks 
beside the skunk using his display all over 
the lobby. 

"Well, I hope I gave you fellows some 
ideas on how to run a circuit and how to 
build up business and say that if any of you 
get near Pneumonia any time, why be sure 
and call on us." 



KEYSTONE 
COMEDY REVIVAL 



SYDNEY CHAPLIN 



will re-edit and re-title the first 

KEYSTONE COMEDIES 

to be released by us. 

The exhibitors of America know that 
Mr. Chaplin has been instrumental in 
the preparation of the greatest comedy 
successes ever made. 

Sydney Chaplin knows comedy. 

Theaters are warned against the use 
of dupes or unauthorized prints of these 
subjects, as all violations will be vigor- 
ously prosecuted. 



TRI-STONE PICTURES, Inc. 

STRAUS BUILDING 
565 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY 



TRIANGLE 
PICTURES 



H. E. Aitken 
G;xar A. Price 



KEYSTONE 
COMEDIES 



Everything for the Box Office f 




\ 









■*< 



mam 



A tale of tempestuous love . in 
desert places — strong in them 
and tense dramatic appeal, and 
rich in oriental atmosphere. 

Norma Talmadge, the screen's 
\ greatest emotional actress, in one 
\ of her finest dramatic roles. 

Eugene O'Brien, one of the most 
popular screen idols, heading a 
supporting cast \vhich includes 
such sterling players as Edwin 
Stevens, Winter Hall, Claire Du 
Brey and Lillian Lawrence. 

A story known to millions through 
Robert Hichens' famous novel and 
stage success. 

Produced with the touch and the 
finish of a master artist, Frank 
Lloyd, director of "Smilin' 
Through," who personally directed 
and supervised this picture. 

Adapted by one of the most suc- 
cessful scenario writers, Frances 
Marion. 

Photographed by Antonio Gaudio 
and Norbert Brodin. 

You've got everything to bring 
them in, and the picture will send 
them out happy. 



Joseph *M.Schenck. 

presents 




A stolen kiss— and her 
husband stepped in I 



ATE 



^voice from the 

v cMinaret" 



FIRST 
NATIONAL 



A IKiat Ylational 
"Picture 



EUGENE H.QOTH presents 




NTMC BK GAME 

WITH CUN 

AND CAMERA 

By H. A. SNOW 

SWEEPS INTO PHENOMENAL 

SUCCESS OVERNIGHT 




:*X 



Lion 



What the Foremost Critics Say About lt> 





MLklkJ. l l «,(<«..'. 



Wild Buck 




"In 'Hunting Big Game 
in Africa with Gun and 
Camera,' H. A. Snow poked 
his camera right up under 
the noses of the wildest 
animals of the African 
jungles and came away 
with pictures of the whites 
of the beasts' eyes. This is 
an extraordinary film." — 
Quinn Martin, N. Y. 

World. 



"A Picture which thrill- 
ed, delighted and enter- 
tained us as much as any- 
thing in years. It is abso- 
lutely fascinating from the 
opening shots of over a 
million penguins flying in- 
to the ocean to the closeup 
of a giant African ele- 
phant charging into the 
camera. All in all we 
consider this the best film 
entertainment in New 
York today."— P. W. Gal- 
lico in Daily News 



"The most complete — 
which means the most in- 
structive and the most 
thrilling — motion picture 
of wild animal life ever 
made. The beautiful, the 
ugly, the swift, the un- 
gainly — they are there, 
singly and in herds, at 
water holes and darting 
across the plain or diving 
into the jungle under- 
growth. Comedy is intro- 
duced to relieve the tense 
action." — J. O. Spearing, 
N. Y. Times. 



Elephant 




Giraffe 



Baboon 




Rhinoceros 




W .idtllliuiJ 
Stanley Crane 




"Most satisfying pictures of wild animal life yet taken." — Don Allen, Eve. World. 
"More drama in a single reel than in a bale of Hollywood productions." — 

N. Y. Times. 

"By all means see this picture and take the children, for if you don't 
they'll never forgive you, if they ever find out about this show." — 

Daily News. 

"All the excitement, thrills and chills of 'Hunting Big Game in Africa' are 
there. No one between the ages of seven and seventy should miss this picture." — 

N. Y. Eve. Post. 
"A marvelous panorama of wild life." — Evening Mail. 

"No Zoo in the world is able to produce as large a number of wild animals as 
these pictures show." — Louella O. Parsons, Morning Telegraph. 
"A vivid record of the thrills and chills of the jungle." — 

Rose Pelswick in N. Y. American. 
"In the midst of most exciting adventures one suddenly realizes that during all 
this hazard the camera was there bravely cranking, cranking, cranking." — 

N. Y. Eve. Journal. 

"An example of the cin- 
ema at its best. A more 
uniformly interesting and 
sensationally thrilling set 
of pictures has not been 
shown on Broadway in 
many a day. It crowds 
more real drama into its 
ten reels than 90 per cent 
of so called super-spe- 
cials." — E. V. Durling in 
the Globe. 
" 'Hunting Big Game in Africa with Gun and Camera' has virtually swept the town off 

its feet. The press went wild over the picture and stated it was the biggest entertainment 

in New York."— Variety of January 12th. 




"The most fascinating 
animal picture ever seen. 
It even exceeds in enter- 
tainment power Paul J. 
Rainey's classic. It is ex- 
citing and humorous. 
Crashes between the Fliv- 
ver and wart hog are 
funnier than the antics of 
Lloyd or Chaplin. — 

N. Y. Sun. 



"The flat statement pre- 
dicting a long showing for 
'Hunting Big Game in 
Africa with Gun and Cam- 
era' is based on a number 
of things, foremost of 
which are these: — Tense, 
thrilling moments, punctu- 
ated with mirth provoking 
scenes and great lessons 
from nature." 

— Eve. Telegram. 




Camel 




Gnu 



LYRIC 

DDir'irc. nights 

Jr inICJId: matinees 



THEATRE Twice Today and Twice Every 



42nd STREET 
West of Broadway 



Day including Sundays 2:30-8:30 



25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00 and $1.50 ALL SEATS 

25c, 50c, 75c! ««»d $1.00 RESERVED 




THE 



ItrU*^ da 



DAILY 



Friday, January 19, 192: 



Ohio Receptive 

(Continued from Page 1) 

from among the leading theater own- 
ers of the key cities of Ohio. Ar- 
rangements were made for other 
meetings of exhibitors in different 
sections of the state in connection 
with the development of the busi- 
ness of the new company. 

The following officers were elected: 
President, M. C. Smith, Toledo; vice- 
president at large, A. C. Hettsinger, 
Cincinnati; vice-presidents David L. 
Shumann, Cleveland; Wm. M. James, 
Columbus; James P. Dunlevy, 
Akron; secretary, Al. F. Kinzeler, 
Dayton; treasurer, John T. Kumler, 
Toledo. Executive committee: Judge 
G. H. Foster, Marion; Henry Biebei- 
son, Jr., Delaware; Wesley H. Preil, 
Norwalk; Fred N. Tynes, Ports- 
mouth; John A. Schwalen, Hamilton; 
Joseph W. Trunk, Youngstown. 
This is president Smith's second 
term. 

The following resolution commend- 
ing the action of Governor Smith, of 
New York State, in his efforts to 
effect the repeal of the censorship 
law was passed amid great en- 
thusiasm. 

"Whereas, our national President, Sydney 
S. Cohen, has personally communicated to 
this convention the information that Gov- 
ernor Alfred E. Smith, of New York State, 
elected on a platform which opposed the 
censorship of motion pictures, sent a mes- 
sage to the legislature of that state recently 
strongly recommending the repeal of the law 
creating a censorship board in that state and, 

"Whereas, in conformity with this official 
program of Governor Smith's hills have been 
introduced in the Senate and House in New 
York State providing for the repeal of this 
censorship law, and are being pressed to 
passage through the influence of Governor 
Smith and other officials interested in pre- 
serving for the people the freedom of the 
press, and that of all other agencies of pub- 
lic expression. 

"Therefore, be it resolved by the Motion 
Picture Theater Owners of Ohio in state 
convention assembled in the City of Colum- 
bus, Wednesday, January 17 1923, that we 



Coast Brevities 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Hollywood — Harry D. Brown, 
with Metro for some months, is 
back at Universal City as electrical 
chief. He will supervise work on 
"The Hunchback of Notre Dame." 



Bud Mason, "stunt" man, was 
severely injured while doubling for 
Neal Hart recently. 



John Bowers heads the supporting 
cast of "The Tinsel Harvest," being 
made at the Ince studios. 



Jane Novak has started work on a 
picture, the name of which has not as 
yet been decided upon. 



Jess Robbins will start work soon 
on a new comedy-drama for Vita- 
graph, at the Fine Arts studio. 



Anderson Smith is the latest addi- 
tion to the cast of "The Abysmal 
Brute," starring Reginald Denny. 



Clara Kimball Youne has finished 
"The Woman of Bronze" and will 
take a short vacation before starting 
work on her next picture. 



James Morrison has been selected 
to play a part in "The Little Girl 
Next Door," the Blair Conan produc- 
tion, which will be made in Chicago. 



Charles Stumar will turn the crank 
on a series of comedy dramas to be 
produced by Hugh Drieker at the 
Fine Arts Studios. Work on the first 
of the series has iust been started. 

H. E. GAUSMAN. 



heartily commend the action thus taken by 
Governor Smith and thank him on behalf 
of the Motion Picture Theater Owners of 
Ohio, and wish him the fullest measure of 
success in this and other announced moves 
calculated to advance the interest of the 
people of New York State and through the 
example and moral influence of which the 
welfare of all the people of the United States 
will be conserved." 



May Revive L. A. Censors 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Some credence is 
placed in the reports that the ques- 
tion of local censorship may be re- 
vived. The opinion is evidently based 
on the resolution passed by the Fri- 
day Morning Club frowning on the 
reappearance on the screen of any 
actor whose life and habits "are 
notoriously immoral." The resolu- 
tion was aimed at Arbuckle and was 
forwarded to the citv council. 



. Now at 203-5 W. 40th St. 
In our OWN LABORATORY 
and STUDIO Jjjr 

ERNEST ST^RN% 

- The Titleman 
PhQpls/P^nn. 2373-2374 



CHROMOS TRADING CO. 
1123 Broadway 

Suite 616 'Phone Chelsea 8264 

CASH AVAILABLE 
IMMEDIATELY FOR 
RELIABLE 
PROPOSITIONS 

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"Daytime Wives" Coming 
F. B. O. has in preparation a pi 
ture called "Daytime Wives." 



MADE TO ORDER 



Commercial Developing and Printing 



Rpjacker Film Mfg. Company' 



die *pu ^buying 
about profits p 





A CONTRACT TO EXHIBIT 



THE WOMAN IN C H A I N S (Ready Now) 

By EDWARD O WINGS TOWNE 
SUNSHINE OF PARADISE ALLEY (In Construction) 

Bv DENMAN THOMPSON 

THE FIRE PATROL— By Hawkins & Barber 
LIFE OF AN ACTRESS— By Langdon McGormack 
TOO RICH TO MARRY— By Edward Owings Towne 
THE FATAL NIGHT— By Hal Read 
DRIVEN FROM HOME— By Hal Read 
LOST IN NEW YORK— By Leonard Grover 
THE LAND OF THE LIVING— By Martin J. Harvey 
YOUR MOTHER AND MINE— By Gromar 
IT'S NEVER TOO LATE TO MEND— By Charles Reade 
IS EVIDENCE OF GOOD SHOWMANSHIP 

AMALGAMATED EXCHANGES OF AMERICA, Inc. 

Foreign Rights Controlled By EXPORT AND IMPORT FILM GO. „ „ ^ 

729 Seventh Avenue, New York City 1540 BROADWAY, N. Y. C. 



(e BRADSTREET 
/* FILHDOM 




jfeRECDQIIZEft 

Authority 



XXIII No. 19 



Saturday, January 20, 1923 



Price 5 Cents 



arlos to Produce 

is Long Association With Wil- 
im Fox to Enter Business 
For Himself 

Carlos, for many years as- 
;d with William Fox, has re- 

to enter the production field 
mself. 

ile no details regarding the 
:ing scheme are available, it is 
lated that in view of the ex- 
e experience Carlos has had 
ent months, as producing man- 
of the Gordon Edwards unit, 
made "Nero" and "The Shep- 
iCing" abroad, he will make big 
ctions. 

los has had many years of ex- 
ce in the industry. His long 
ion with Fox Film gave him 
edge of every branch of the in- 
' from the launching of ex- 
es and theater operation to the 
i of production. 



Naulty's Son Killed 

les N. Naulty, 18-year old son, 
N. Naulty, studio manager" of 
ctive Prod., Inc., was killed in 
;e, N. J., early in the week in 
sled accident. 



Woolwine Declines Offer 
Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Angeles — District Attorney 
wine announces that he is no 
■ considering seriously the offer 
him to act as head of an in- 
dent organization similar to 
of the Hays organization. 



Jannings On His Own 
Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
lin — Emil Jannings, formerly 
the E. F. A., has started his 
producing company. Davidson 
svered his connections with the 
. A., to become manager of 
rig's new company. A screen 
<n of one of Schiller's plays will 
oduced first. 



Fighting Serial Ban 
Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
erior, Wis. — Has the mayor 
:gal right or authority to pro- 
serials from being shown in 
theaters? This question will 
have to be answered by the 
, as a result of Mayer Fred 
r issuing a statement to the 
that serials of any type must 
le shown in Superior theaters. 
r declares in his statement that 
will be no exceptions to this 
I, that the good serials must not 
iiown because the succeeding 
! night not be so good. 




"A picture as colorful and as pulsating in its dancing and knifing as "Secrets 
of Paris,' should, according to past records, stand them up in the Cameo 
all this week and next, if it remains that long." Quinn Martin in the 
N. Y. World. His prediction became a fact. — Advt. 



F. B. O. Buys "Lights Out" 
F. B. O. has purchased screen 
rights to "Lights Out," which 
recently ran at the Vanderbilt. An- 
other purchase is "Knight of the 
Range" by William Wallace. 



Friars Give Dinner 
The Friars will tender a dinner 
tonight to Fred S. Murphy. One of 
the features on the program is a 
film comedy featuring 30 Friars, 
among them, Will Rogers. 



Planned One With Reid 

It is not expected that the death 
of Wallace Reid will cause any 
changes of importance in the Para- 
mount schedule for the year. In the 
list of 39 pictures to be released be- 
tween now and September, he was 
to appear in one, "A Gentleman of 
Leisure." 



1st Nat'l Committee Meeting 

The executive committee of First 
National is now in session. Those 
attending are Robert Lieber, In- 
dianapolis; Moe Mark, New York; 
Sam Katz, Chicago; Abe Blank, Des 
Moines, E. V. Richards, New Or- 
leans and Harry Schwalbe, New 
York. 



Dempsey Plans More Films 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — It is understood that 

Jack Dempsey will return to pictures 

shortly, and that a contract is now 

drawn up awaiting his signature. 



Gasnier Film at Criterion 
Al Lichtman arranged yesterday 
for "Poor Men's Wives," a Gasnier 
Prod., to open for a run at the Cri- 
terion on Jan. 28, following 
"Salome." 



Moscow Art Actors in Films 
Members of the Moscow Art The- 
ater appear in four films made in 
Russia, and designed to make their 
American debut this year, according 
to Intercontinental Pictures Agency, 
which will distribute them. 

The first is "Polikushka," taken 
from Tolstoy's novel. 



Plans for Better Films 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Hartford, Conn.— The Connecticut 
Co-operative Ass'n for Better Films, 
Inc., was formed here in order to 
review motion pictures shown in 
this state and recommend only those 
that appeal as suitable for exhibition. 
Some exhibitors are reported in 
sympathy with the plan. 



Order Modified 

Valentino Wins Point Before Appel- 
late Division — New 1 Order Likely 
The Appellate Division of the 
Supreme Court yesterday ordered the 
injunction secured by Famous Play- 
ers against Rodolph Valentino modi- 
fied in three instances as follows: 

In paragraph one of the words "or 
otherwise" eliminated. 

In paragraph two the words "or 
rendering any services for himself or 
on his own account" eliminated. 

In paragraph three, the words "or 
any other business of any kind or 
class whatsoever" eliminated. 

It was taken for granted yesterday 
that these revisions meant that Valen- 
tino could go to work for interests 
aside from Famous Players provided 
he did not attempt to go into pictures 
or on the speaking stage, as long as 
the Famous contract existed. 

As a' result of the decision it is 
understood that a new order will be 
filed and when this is argued it is 
understood that Famous Players will 
make an effort to include in the in- 
junction a clause preventing Valen- 
tino from appearing publicly in 
dances. 

It is understood that under the de- 
cision Valentino can make phono- 
graph records, or do any of a number 
of things other than appear publicly. 
The dancing point promises to be a 
strong one, and much stress will be 
laid upon this. It is said that Valen- 
tino has been offered $5,000 a week 
by the Keith circuit to do a dancing 
act in vaudeville. 

At Famous Players pending the 
reading of the decision no statement 
was made. Arthur Butler Graham, 
counsel for Valentino was out of the 
city yesterday, but at his office it was 
stated no one cared to make any com- 
ment in his absence. 

Efforts towards patching up the 
difficulties between Valentino and Fa- 
mous Players have been made re- 
cently by interested friends of both 
Valentino and Adolph Zukor, but to 
date they have failed of consumma- 
tion. 



Back Monday 

Sydney S. Cohen and Mike J. 
O'Toole, of the M. P. T. O., are 
expected back from the M. P. T. O. 
of Ohio convention on Monday. 



Another Drop in F. P. Common 
There was another sharp drop in 
Famous Players common stock yes- 
terday. The closing quotation was 
83y 2 or 2% points below Thursday's 
close. About 20,400 shares changed 
hands. 



THE 



a 




Saturday, January 20, 1923 
— i— mm ii ■ r imn 




VeL XXIII No. 19 Saturday, Jan. 20. t923 Price 5 Cents 

Copyright 1923, Wid's Film and Film Folks. 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St.. 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor; 
. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Catered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
■onths, $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY. 71-73 West 44th St., New York. 
N. Y. ; Phone: Vanderbilt 45S1-4SS2-5538. 
Bollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 
Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Are. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter. 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau, Prague (Crecho-Slo- 
vakia), Wenzelsplata. 

Quotations 

High Low Close Sales 

East. Kod. 9Sy 2 93*/ 4 95 1,000 

F. P.-L. .. 85 82^ S3y 2 20,400 

do pfd Not quoted 

/Soldwyn .. SY% 5\i $ l A 900 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's ... 18^4 18f£ 18^ 1,500 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 

Winship Goes to Mexico 

William C. Winship, until recently 
at the Los Angeles exchange has been 
made manager of Paramount's offices 
in Mexico City. 

British Trade Exposition 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

London — The First International 
Cinema Trades Exhibition will be 
held at Olympia, from July 17 to 
August 4. 

Frank Newman Injured 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Kansas City — Frank Newman is 
in a hospital in St. Joseph, in a ser- 
ious condition as a result of a recent 
automobile accident. 

New Shea House in Buffalo? 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Buffalo — It is rumored here that 

Shea plans to erect* another house 

to be built on Main Street, and to 

be known as Shea's Metropolitan. 

Klan Films Barred 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Chicago— Any films of the Ku 
Klux Klan that spread the Klan 
propaganda cannot be shown in any 
local theater, according to a ruling 
just passed by James W. Breen, 
ass't corp. counsel of this city. 



Exploitation 

Some of the startling one-sheets 
conceived by Clem Deneker, of the 
Deneker circuit, are reproduced 
below. Air. Deneker brought them 
with him from Pneumonia. New, and 
displayed them at the A. M. P. A. 
luncheon on Thursday. 

MY POLICY 

By Clem Deneker 
Deneker Circuit of Theaters 

From now on when I adv. a 
picture is in 5 spools you can de- 
pend on it. No more booking cats 
bags without I see the picture ahead. 
I leave for New York tomorrow, 
and Mrs. Deneker will be in charge. 
I guarantee the best films direct 
from the studios when I get back. 
I am also getting a new melodeum 
and an old experienced player who 
sings also. Nothing to souper for 
the Deneker Circuit. Friends can 
address me, c/o Film Daily, if you 
have any suggestions to make. 

C. DENEKER, 

Circuit Owner. 



Specialties 

Zither Solos 
Pythian Sisters Choir 
Elks quartet (4 people). 
Mouth Organ Trio (3 

people). 
The Basso Duo (2 people) 

and special 
Tie-ups of Publicity. 



Film Exports 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Washington — $750,000 worth of 
film was exported from this country 
during the month of October, ac- 
cording to figures just made known 
by the Bureau of Foreign and 
Domestic Commerce. 



Coast Photoplayers' Exchange 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — It is reported here 
that an official of a prominent pro- 
ducing organization has launched 
plans for the formation of a large 
central photoplayers' exchange, to 
be opened about March 15. Negotia- 
tions to obtain the American Legion 
Stadium to house the organization, 
which, it is said, is supported by 
every studio in Hollywood, are now 
under way. 



Asks $10,000 Damages 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Findlay, O. — E. B. Gilmore, op- 
erating the Marvin, has -filed suit 
against J. N. Doty and Rev. W. E. 
Hill, alleging the defendants had hurt 
his business to the extent of $10,000 
by prosecuting him on Sunday 
opening charges. 

Mayor Rodabaugh has ordered 
j that all picture theaters remain 
closed on Sundays, pursuant to the 
recently passed ordinance, until a 
grand jury decrees otherwise. Sev- 
eral petitions have been filed by the- 
ater owners asking that the ordinance 
be lifted. 



ARBUCKLE 

Tonight in 
"HOW COFFEE HAPPENS" 

Produced by Industrial Film Co. 
featuring 
ARBUCKLE BROTHERS 
(Maybe Fatty and one other) 
in 2 spools and bring the kids. 
Watch Keyser's Store 
for special Window Display. 
No Higher Prices. 



(i (&clu.<UztiarLal (J ixitcouu^ 




HE. SPICE Of THE ?ROGS.»,M 



ELITE (formerly Grogan's Stable) 

Wednesday Night 

(if print gets in) 

* * * * 

Mr. Henrico Caruso 

The coming screen star 

in 

"MY COUSIN" 

A picture of the dirty dagos of the 

underworld in 8 spools 

See the Famous Joke Book in the 

Lobby 



Special 


A Herring to Every Grown-Up 


Adult 


over 21 years 


A Sourdine to the Kiddies 


Fish from Central Market 



Coming Saturday 

(If picture gets in) 

'THE FISHERMAN'S EX-WIFE" 

Selznick Souper Special 



Tonight Fashion Show 

and the souper-feature 
in natural colors 

"BRUCE IN THE MOUNTAINS" 

and 

"WILDERNESS TAILS" 

Fashions in Parade 

Horse Blankets and Buggy Robes 

(Jones Hardware Co.) 
Bath Robes (1 style only) 

(Mrs. Deneker) 
Hats and feathers (Latest in town) 

(Paris Millinery Emporium) 
Rubbers and Boots 

(Boston Shoe Co.) 

Mufflers — Mittens — Red Flannels 

(Broadway Clothes Shop) 

COME EARLY— STAY LATE 
SAME PRICES 



San Francisco News 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
San Francisco — R. A. McNeil. ] 
H. Emmick and M. Naify are 
incorporators of the Monterey Thi 
aters Co., with a capital of $50,00 
and the Merced Theater Co., wit 
a capital of $150,000. They ha\ 
purchased the Park, Globe, Freemor 
Bell, Casino and Fruitvale in Oal 
land from N. Mamlar. Several i 
the houses will be made larger. 



Ferris Hartman and Paul Steii 
dorf have secured control of tl 
Rivoli for four years. 



Fred Weis, formerly manager i 
the Warfield, has gone to Kans; 
City. 



Sol Lesser is remodeling and r 
decorating his New Lyceum. 



Roos Bros, are planning the ere 
tion of a large house on Grand Avi 
near B'way, Oakland. 



The three bandits, who robbi 
the manager of the T. & D., at Sa 
ramento recently, have been captun 
here. - 



y Blanche Sweet in "Tess" 
/^ (Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Marshall Neilan a 
nounces that Blanche Sweet will pi; 
Tess in "Tess of the Duberville; 
which he will produce for Goldwy 



Goldburg Leaves for Coast 
Jesse J. Goldburg, president of I, 
dependent Pictures Corp., left y< 
terday for Oregon and Los Angel 
to start production on the first 
three pictures that will be releas 
by Independent. Goldburg will vi 
the exchange centers on his retu 
trip. 



%xcsxi pt&xlbyevn 
4J|irutTtrc (Extrporatinu 

RESOURCES - $5,000,000 

Knickerbocker Building 
Broadway at 42nd Street, N. Y. City 



SIMPLEX TITLE SHOP 

220 W. 42nd St. 
Announces the closing of a contract 
giving it exclusive sales rights on the 

FAMOUS STONE LIBRARY 
Over two million feet of selected shots 
as far back as 1897, negative and posi- 
tive, are now made available for your 
requirements. 

Phone Bryant 0984-0985 



We Are Ready to Pay CAS 

'' FOR PRODUCTIONS OFMEP.IT 

for NEW YORK CM and STATE a NORTHERN NEWdERSI 

v The Bigger They Come - - The Better We Like Them . 

R.E2*6V\T.N PICTURES, inc 

729-* SEVENTH AVE. Phone BRYANT A-7BA-- 6V 



THE 



aturday, January 20, 1923 



■<S^ 



DAILY 



^atheNews 

No. 7 

sball on snowshoes in New Hampshire; 
ids in Oregon; Huge protest from 
ain's unemployed; a prince in exile; the 
Jest man-carrying balloon; Jewtraw wins 
kating championship in Plattsburg, and 
r news from all over the world. 

THE ONLY ONE-REEL FEATURE 



tod 



Tyrol Forms New Unit 
Jacques Tyrol Prod., Inc., have 
been formed. The company will 
produce. 

Norca's Next 

"The Red Trail," by Lesley Mason, 

featuring Nora Swinburne, will be 

the next picture put out by Norca, 

following "Love's' Old Sweet Song." 

Changes Name 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Trenton, N. J.— The Chaplin 
Classics have changed their name to 
C. C. Pictures. 



Atlanta Notes 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Atlanta— A. W. Blue, formerly 
with C. E. Cooley in Florida, is now 
on the road for Consolidated. 



J. A. Reynolds has gone to Florida 
for Peerless. 



C. L. Kendall, division manager of 
Vitagraph is here. 



■ 




New Theaters 

dacon. Ga. — The Princess is being 

lodelled. 



danger, Tex. — The Rex has opened 
ler the management of J. M. Palm- 



Norwich, Conn. — The Palace The- 
r Corp., will build a new house 
e. 



Inid, Okla.— The Criterion, de- 
ayed by fire several weeks ago, will 
rebuilt. 



Steffes Offers Business Booster 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Minneapolis — W. A. Steffes sug- 
gests a special drive for business 
during some specially designated 
week in February. 



W-B After Product 
The W-B Exchange intends ex- 
tending activities to include the dis- 
tribution of state right pictures in 
Greater New York and Northern 
New Jersey. 

New Rules for Film Shipments 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Washington — The Interstate Com- 
merce Commission has issued new 
regulations covering the shipment of 
films. 



iinghamton, N, Y. — The Lyric will 
rebuilt, Manager Frank Bovay 
lounces. 



5an Francisco — Sam H. Levin is 
nning the erection of the Balboa 
Ocean Ave. 



jibson City, 111. — The new Edna, 
:h a seating capacity of over 700, 
5 been opened. 



Government Films 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Washington — The following films 
ve been produced under the super- 
ion of the Dept. of Commerce 
d the Bureau of Mines, with the 
I af various manufacturers, to ac- 
aint the public with methods used 
making American products. There 
no charge for renting these films, 
t the borrower must assume all 
;ponsibility in case of loss or dam- 
e: 

rhe Story of Petroleum, 4 reels; The Story 
Sulphur, 2 reels; The Story of Ingot Rock 
illing, 3 reels; The Story of Abrasives, 
reels ; Mexico and Its Oil, 4 reels ; The 
■ry of the Motor Car, 4 reels; The Story 
Alloy Steel, 3 reels; The Story of Heavy 
cavating Machinery, 4 reels ; Oxygen, the 
mder Worker, 4 reels; The Story of an 
ctric 1 Meter, 3 reels ; The Story of a 
.tch, 3 reels ; The Story of an Automo- 
•, 5 reels ; The Story of Compressed Air, 
eels ; Water Power, 2 reels ; Transporta- 
l, 2 reels; The Story of a V-Type 8-Cyl- 
er Motor Car, 4 reels; The Story of a 
ve in Head Motor Car, 4 reels ; The Story 
Machine Tool Manufacture, 3 reels ; The 
ry of Steel, 6 reels; The Story of Port- 
i Cement, 2 reels. 

These films may be secured by ap- 
:ation to either of the above 
ntioned departments. 



Big Foreign Deal 
The Agrupacion Cinematografica 
Espanola, S. A., of Barcelona, Spain, 
have secured 100 First National pic- 
tures for distribution in Spain, 
Portugal, the Canary Islands and the 
Spanish African colonies. 

Carewe Picks Cast 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — J. Warren Kerrigan, 
Sylvia Breamer and Russell Simpson 
will head the cast of "The Girl of 
the Golden West," which Edwin 
Carewe will produce at United 
Studios for First National. 



The Automatic Player Piano Co. 
have moved to 64 No. Pryor St. 

F. H. Kirby who has been connect- 
ed with Bromberg Attractions in 
Georgia and Alabama is now with 
American Releasing. 



3rd Ave. May Have New House 
A new theater may be constructed 
on the northwest corner of 3rd Ave. 
and 64th St. 



Use Armory for Large Set 

What Cosmopolitan claims is the 
biggest set ever constructed for a 
motion picture, has been built in the 
23rd Regiment Armory, in Brooklyn. 
Scenes will be shot next Monday 
before a delegation of newspaper 
folks. A buffet lunch will be served, 
presided over by Marion Davies, 
who is starred. 



J. M. Hermann branch manager of 
Pearce Films, in New Orleans, suc- 
ceeds R. I. Robinson as manager of 
the local exchange. Robinson has 
gone to New York. 



{TITLES 



NEGATIVE 
POSITIVE 
IncL CARDS 

15 CENTS PER FOOT 

24 Hour Service if 'necessary 

| SIMPLEXjnTLE^SHOP 

220fW. 42d Stre.t] Bryant 0985 



Here's the title — and the picture! 

"LOVE'S OLD SWEET SONG" 

A LUND PRODUCTION 

With an all-star cast including Louis Wolheim, Helen Lowell, 
Donald Gallaher and Helen Weir. 



Action — Suspense— Mystery — Surprise and 
A GREAT LOVE STORY 

NORCA PICTURES, Inc. 1540 Broadway, N. Y. City 



Plan Theater in Chicago 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Chicago — A theater and stores will 
be built on Sheridan Road, between 
Albion and Loyola, at an estimated 
cost of $160,000 by Marks, Goodman, 
Marks and Harrison. 



Traverse City House Burns 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Traverse City, Mich. — The Lyric, 
a 1400 seat house, owned by Fitz- 
patrick and McElroy, was burned to 
the ground Tuesday night. Fire 
was caused by crossed wires. 



Brouse Closes Ottawa House 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Ottawa — The attitude of several 
unions of organized labor has brought 
about the closing of the Family, by 
Harry Brouse. After showing stock 
Brouse decided to revert to pictures 
and vaudeville. The musicians' union 
demanded that an orchestra leader 
be maintained in addition to a new 
director. The stage employes also 
insisted, it is said, on having five 
men back stage when only two men 
were necessary. The theater re- 
opened, but patronage did not come 
up to expectations. 



| KNOW EVERY DAY 
[ ALL THE NEWS 

| OF THE 

I PICTURE BUSINESS 



The Film Daily 

71 West 44th St., New York City 

Kindly enter my subscription to The Film Daily for 
one year, starting immediately, to include 

THE FILM DAILY— 313 Issues— Every Day 
Including Weekly Reviews — 52 Issues 
1922 Year Book— Cloth Bound— 500 pages 

Subscription, $10— Foreign, $15 

Name 

Theatre 

Address ' 

HIIIIIIIIIWIIIUM 




DAILY 



Saturday, January 20, 1923 



The Public and "Millions" 

The following communication has 
been received from Pat Dowling, of 
The Christie Film Co., Hollywood: 

"Dear Danny: 

"Your editorial the other day on 
'more pictures at lesser cost,' was a 
great thing, but didn't go far enough. 
I wish you could say something some 
day on the subject of 'less hollering 
from the industry to the public about 
money.' 

"The Los Angeles papers have 
been flooded the last few weeks with 
studio stories about the millions to, 
be spent by companies and to be 
earned by stars this year. Sometimes 
the figures are exaggerated, some- 
times they are not. But in either 
instance, I believe publicity given to 
large figures has an awful kick back. 

"The public is getting damn sick 
of having millions flung in 4heir 
faces by moving picture interests. 
And yet some of our biggest com- 
panies go right on announcing 
'million dollar quotas,' 'million dollar 
salaries,' 'million dollar contracts' 
and what nots. 

"What is the use of continually 
shouting to the public that ours is 
the fourth greatest industry, when 
figures recently given out in New 
York and printed in the leading 
dailies, motion picture products are 
not even listed in the FIRST TEN? 

"The public has come to believe 
that every one connected with pic- 
tures is fabulously rich. You would 
be surprised to know how many 
times every day even our compara- 
tively small company is solicited for 
donations. The solicitors expert to 
get thousands. 

"I believe there are certain people 
in Los Angeles who think that Will 
Hays and his big hearted bosses 
should build parks and community 
centers and playgrounds in Holly- 
wood out of their 'fat purses' and fix 
the rotten streets and put in buss 
lines and new trolley service and per- 
haps build hillside homes for every- 
one who wants to live in the film cap- 
ital. 

"The public has naturally received 
these ideas from newspaper publicity 
concerning money. Every time they 
pay fifty cents to get into a theater 
they have an idea that about forty- 
nine cents of that is going right into 
the pocket of the star and the com- 
pany producing the picture. 

"It seems that we have tried our 
best to kill and cook our own goose 
in this way. Big figures may flatter 
the vanity of a few short sighted offi- 
cials. It is a cinch they don't kid any 
exhibitors any more. And you can 
bet your life the time has some when 
they don't kid the public but simply 
do to it what the well known red flag 
does to the bull." 



Coast Brevities 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Hollywood — Clyde Cook is work- 
ing on "The Artist." 



Hazel Deane has been signed by 
Al Christie. 



"Bella Donna" has been completed 
after three months of work. 



Harry Mann has been signed for 
stock at Universal. 



t'' Goldwyn has signed Claude Gilling- 
water to act in "Three Wise Fools." 



Marcel Perez has finished direction 
of "Three O'Clock in the Morning." 



"Making Good," a new Pete Mor- 
rison feature, has been completed. 
Sanford Prod, will distribute. 



Charles Stallings has been elected 
president of the Assistant Directors 
Association. 



Betty Francisco and Helen Fergu- 
son will play opposite Hoot Gibson 
in "The Poor Worm." 



Theodore Von Eltz and Lillian 
Lawrence have been added to the 
cast of "The Common Law." 



Edward Martindel is supporting 
Shirley Mason in "The Eleventh 
Hour," directed by B pr nip Durning. 



Jim Davis has been engaged to 
direct a series of comedies for 
Century. He will direct Buddy 
Messenger's third vehicle. 



James B. Leong is serving as 
technical advisor in production of 
"The Remittance Woman," in which 
he has a role in support of Ethel 
Clayton. 



Frank Beresford is adapting 
LeRoy Scott's "Cordelia, the Mag- 
nificent," which will be Clara Kim- 
ball Young's next Harry Garson 
production for Metro. 

H. E. GAUSMAN. 



Mabel's Next "Mary Ann" 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Mabel Normand's 
next picture will be "Mary Ann." 



Iris Opens Own Exchange 
John J. Iris, former New York 
manager for Educational, has opened 
a short reel exchange of his own 
in the Godfrey Bldg. "Among the 
Masterpieces" has just finished a 
month's run at the Criterion and 
"Famous Paintings" at the Rialto 
and Rivoli. 



Floyd Hopkins 111 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Harrisburg, Pa. — Floyd Hopkins, 
manager of the Wilmer and Vincent 
houses here, is ill with pneumonia. 



"Blue Water" Finished 

Ernest Shipman yesterday wired 
the following from St. John, N. B.: 

"The motion picture production of 
'Blue Water,' from the book of the 
same name, by Capt. Frederick Wil- 
liam Wallace, had its premier show- 
ing in St. John today, before the 
directors and stockholders of New 
Brunswick Films, Ltd. David M. 
Hartford, the director, and Ernest 
Shipman, who will now exploit the 
picture in all countries, were among 
those present. It will be released to 
the Canadian and American theaters 
in February. 



Short 



Stuff 



The value of the short subject to 
your program. 

How to build a program through 
the use of short stuff. 

How well known exhibitors use 
short subjects to advantage. 

"Fillers" at a price vs. real short 
subjects of material value. 

"How I pick my short subjects" 
by important Broadway managers. 

The news reel and its audience 
value. 

Just a few of the ideas that will 
be presented in the forthcoming 
Short Stuff issue of THE FILM 
DAILY, out Sunday, February 18. 

An unusual "buy** for the pro- 
ducer and distributor of short sub- 
jects. 



£ BRADSTREET 
f FILMDOM 




,. XXIII No. 20 



Sunday, January 21, 1923 



let ready! 



^recognized 
Authority 



Price 25 Cents 



CARL 

A.EMMLE 

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The value of the short subject to 
your program. 

How to build a program through the 
use of short stuff. 

How well known exhibitors use short 
subjects to advantage. 

"Fillers" at a price vs. real short sub- 
jects of material value. 

"How I pick my short subjects" by 
important Broadway managers. 

The news reel and its audience value. 

Just a few of the ideas that will be 
presented in the forthcoming Short Stuff 
issue of THE FILMffDAILY, out Sunday, 
February 19. 



3 PS 



An unusual "buy" for the producer and dis- 
tributor of short subjects. 



^BftiWTREET 
o/FILMDOH 




Ia 7/<?RE(OCHlZE0 

Authority 

BBS 



Afeu\y o/ tf*e Week 
in Headlines 



Vol. XXIII No. 20 Sunday, Jan. 21, 1923 Price 25c. Monday 

=— . Universal plans big Broadway theater and office bldg. 

Copyright, 1923, Wid s Film and Film Folks, Inc. ^ . -,,.., ^T 

============ ^^ ====:== ^ == ^ = ^ ===:==== Graham- Wilcox Prod, of London buys "Loyalties" 

Published Daily at 71-73 Weit 44th St., New York, N. Y., by and "Chll Chin Chow." 

WID'S FILM AND FILM FOLKS, INC. T?„»™„o T31 A c •* i i i a 1 i . r 

• famous Players definitely shelves Arbuckle features. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Lditor; J. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and o T ~r> u r 

Buiiness Manager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager b. L,. Kothalel honor guest at Green Room Club Revel. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, at the post office at 

New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 1879. TuesdaV 

Terms (Postage free), United States, Outside of Greater New York, 

lio.oo one year; 6 months, $s.oo; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, $is.oo. Charles O. Baumann forms Baumann Dist. Corp. to 

Subscribers should remit with order. l 

Address all communications to THE FILM DAILY, 71-/3 West 44th St., produce and distribute. 

New York, n. Y. Telephone, Vanderbiit 4551-4552-5558 Distributors agree on features of standard contract. 

Hollywood, California: Harvey E. Gausman, 6411 Hollywood Blvd. Phone, . 

Hollywood 1603. lo call meeting with exhibitors shortly. 

Chicago Representative: Irving Mack, 808 South Wabash Ave. C, ,„,.-,„„ r"^...-+ i:»v,:+ i:„i :i:* c 

Lo.dc* Representative: Ernest W. Fredman, The Film Renter. 53. Shafte.- Supreme Court limits liability of express companies 

bury Ave., London, w i. j n the matter of shipments. 

Paris Representative. Le Film, 42, Rue de Clichy. 

Central European Representative: Internationale Filroschau, Prague 

(Czecho-siovakia), Wenzeispiatz. Wednesday 

All Lesser enterprises merged in Principal Pictures 

Features Reviewea^^Z^I^^Zt^ 1923; """ £rom 

/Universal buys Charles Brabin's "Driven." 
.GIMME ioidwyn productions to be made on unit basis. Each 
Goldwyn I Page 2 director to have complete staff. 

Hampton Del Ruth Prod. > ^ ^ ^r Thursday 

THE MARRIAGE CHANCE Famous Players wipes off $1,000,000 note from liabil- 

American Releasing Corp Page 3 ities; 1922 earnings expected to be about on par 

with 1921. 
DRUMS OF FATE Censorship referendum may be launched in Ohio. 
Paramount Page 6 Plan discussed at Columbus convention. 

John C. Ragland goes West to see sales values are in- 
Maurice Tourneur Prod. .WHILE PARIS SLEEPS ^^ in future Associated Exhibitor productions. 

„ ,, . t. ^ Court decides for Max Glucksmann and against Gil- 

Hodkmson Page 7 . . * 

lespie Brothers in action involving dual appearance 

Charles Jones in. . . .THE FOOTLIGHT RANGER . ° f same pictures in foreign territory 

J oSj- P ai "ker Read making The Coward for Goldwyn. 

Fox Page/^ Distinctive Prod, plans 12 during 1923. 

ALL THE BROTHERS WERE VALIANT Friday 

Metro Page 9 Sid Chaplin to edit Keystone Comedies for Tri-Stone 

and state rights release. 
THE CUSTARD CUP Theater Owners Dist. Corp. officials get cordial recep- 

Fox Page 13 tion at Ohio convention. Martin Smith re-elected. 

Clem Deneker, famous Pneumonia, New, exhibitor, 
THE GHOST PATROL addresses A. M. P. A. 

Universal Page 14 Wallace Reid dies in Hollywood. 

HEAD HUNTERS OF THE SOUTH SEA Saturday 

Associated Exhibitors Page 15 Abe Carlos leaves Fox to enter production field. 

Injunction against Valentino modified. May permit 

Short Reels Page 16 him to enter vaudeville field. 



'Pardoning the bad is injuring the good "—Benjamin Franklin. 



—2&*l 



DAILV 



Sunday, January 21, 1923 



Satisfying Light Entertainment With N umerous Pleasing Bits 



"GIMME" 
Rupert Hughes Prod. — Goldwyn 

DIRECTOR Rupert Hughes 

AUTHORS Rupert and Adelaide Hughes 

SCENARIO BY Rupert Hughes 

CAMERAMAN '. John Mescall 

AS A WHOLE A pleasing entertainment of the 

light variety; an enjoyable picture that the 
majority will like 

STORY Nothing very much to it but a lot of 

good incident and pertinent detail makes it at- 
tractive 
DIRECTION Usually good; although occasion- 
ally choppy; production values high 

PHOTOGRAPHY Splendid 

LIGHTINGS Excellent 

PLAYERS Helene Chadwick and Gaston Glass 

well suited to principal roles; others Kate Les- 
ter, Eleanor Boardman, David Imboden and H. 
B. Walthall 

EXTERIORS Very pretty garden shots 

INTERIORS Good 

DETAIL All right; one or two sub-titles too 

"pointed." 

CHARACTER OF STORY Business girl who 

marries wealthy fellow goes back to work to 
assert her independence 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,769 feet 

"Gimme," the latest Rupert Hughes screen effort, is 
an exposition of. the modern woman, "in all her glory" 
and the pictures makes it very plain that she is here to 
stay so where they need to be convinced on this point, 
very likely Hughes' picture will go a long way toward 
getting- them interested in the idea. It" "Gimme" does 
nothing else, it certainly makes plain the position of 
the business woman of today and her attitude toward 
husbands and matrimony in general. 

Rupert Hughes and his wife have supplied some 
interesting detail that will undoubtedly make the pic- 



ture thoroughly attractive to a large, majority of pic- 
ture goers and although there is no very weighty ma- 
terial and some of the situations are slightly exag- 
gerated, the idea contains a splendid quantity of audi- 
ence appeal. These newlywed comedy dramas seem to 
"take" with the average public about as well as any- 
thing the screen offers. They never tire of the domes- 
tic trials and tribulations of the pretty heroine and her 
new, good looking husband. And they couldn't ask 
for a better couple than Helene Chadwick and Gaston 
Glass, the newlyweds of "Gimme." 

Besides the actual pleasure and entertainment to be 
found in the picture, there is some mure or less con- 
vincing reasoning which may lead to heated debates 
where the spectators happen to find the theme "hitting 
home." There is a lot that can be said for and against 
the Hughes' idea of the modern woman, nevertheless. 
From a production standpoint, everything has been 
very well taken care of, and, as usual with the Rupert 
Hughes features, the picture contains plenty of pic- 
torial appeal. One or two of the sub-titles might be 
modified to appear less "pointed." 

Helene Chadwick is particularly appealing in this 
and she seems to get a lot of pleasure out of bringing 
friend husband, Gaston Glass, around to her way of 
thinking regarding a 50-50 sharing basis for husband 
and wife. Glass does good work also. 

Story: Fanny Daniels, an interior decorator, bor- 
rows $500 from Lambert, her employer, who is in love 
with her, to buy her trousseau. Her marriage to the 
wealthy Clinton Ferris does not prove entirely success- 
ful and Fanny gets her job back. Lambert renews 
his attentions and threatens to tell Ferris of the loan. 
In the home of Miss Wainwright, which Fanny is to 
redecorate, Lambert makes another plea and the two 
are discovered by Ferris. Miss Wainwright explains 
matters, Ferris learns that the loan bought Fanny's 
wardrobe, and a reunion follows with a 50 50 sharing 
basis as the understanding between husband and wife. 



Material In This Will Appeal To Many 



Exhibitors who cater to a crowd that prefers light, 
pleasing entertainments, will do well to secure 
"Gimme." It contains a lot of interesting angles on 
present day living that should make it particularly 
attractive. The title is unusually strong and should 
be sufficient to arouse their curiosity. They'll all 
know what to expect since the recent popularity of the 
newly coined word. 



Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 

A teaser campaign should prove effective exploita- 
tion. Use throw-aways employing the word "Gimme" 
with another such as "Gimme a dime," "Gimme a new 
hat," following it up with the announcement of the 
picture. Use Rupert Hughes' name and let them know 
Helene Chadwick and Gaston Glass handle the princi- 
pal parts. 



' ■vhwk i mmn y 

Sunday, January 21, 1923 



THE 



•szti 



DAILY 



Fairly Interesting Picture Interrupted By Spooky Sequence 



Hampton Del Ruth Prod. 

"THE MARRIAGE CHANCE" 

American Releasing Corp. 

DIRECTOR Hampton Del Ruth 

AUTHOR Hampton Del Ruth 

SCENARIO BY Not credited 

CAMERAMAN Dal Clawson 

AS A WHOLE Rather interesting picture except 

that mystery episode is a trifle too gruesome 
despite dream ending 

STORY Has some good romantic sequences and 

has been given a first rate production 

DIRECTION Good, on the whole, though injects 

a little too much unpleasant detail in one 
sequence 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS All right 

PLAYERS Alta Allen gives a pleasing perform- 
ance and at times photographs very well; Mil- 
ton Sills adequate; Henry B. Walthall, Tully 
Marshall and Irene Rich suitable 

EXTERIORS Few 

INTERIORS Appropriate 

DETAIL Suffices 

CHARACTER OF STORY Girl faints during 

her marriage ceremony and vision results in the 
marriage of sister whom she had persuaded 
against it 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,840 feet 

The important feature of this Hampton Del Ruth 
production is the surprise ending upon which the 
climax hinges, a sequence which, in itself, consists of 
some rather unpleasant detail and incidents which may 
thrill those who don't object to their thrills being de- 
rived from fairly gruesome business. Of course it is 
all passed off in the dream ending but for the time 
being the atmosphere is thoroughly capable of supply- 
ing some very realistic chills for the more sensitive 
ones. 



There are two sisters, the younger about to marry 
the district attorney, and the older still engaged to the 
fanatical Dr. Graydon who devotes his time to the 
study of vivisection. Eleanor persuades Mary that 
Dr. Graydon does not intend to marry her at all and 
succeeds in having Mary break the engagement. Prior 
to the ceremony which will unite Eleanor and Bradley, 
the district attorney, Eleanor takes a drink of water 
handed to her by Graydon. She faints and is pro- 
nounced dead by Graydon. Returning from the 
funeral Mary and Bradley notice a kitten drinking from 
the same glass, with the kitten also falling over dead. 
Analysis proves the water contained poison. Later, 
the cat comes back to life. Bradley hastens to the 
graveyard where Eleanor's body is disinterred and 
the casket found empty. Later she is found in Gray- 
don's home and Graydon about to perform an opera- 
tion when he is shot by Mary. 

This is a decidedly unpleasant episode to an other- 
wise interesting picture but, of course, the fact that 
Eleanor was in a faint and dreamed all this, is supposed 
to take away the unsavory atmosphere and supply the 
picture with a genuine surprise ending. It is doubtful, 
however, if the average audience will be in a right 
mood for the surprise ending as thought out by Del 
Ruth. 

The story has been given a good production. The 
first reels are thoroughly interesting and the romances 
of the two sisters and their maiden aunt promise an 
enjoyable and unusual picture, wholly unlike what the 
theme develops into. Del Ruth has injected some 
effective humorous business particularly in connection 
with the "romance" of the maiden aunt, played splen- 
didly by Laura La Varnie, and Tully Marshall, as the 
unwilling suitor. Alta Allen is a pleasing Eleanor and 
Irene Rich is a sympathetic Mary. Milton Sills, 
Henry B. Walthall and Mitchell Lewis complete the 
cast. 



Will Do If They Don't Mind a Few Chill-Provoking Thrills 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



If you don't think they'll object to the mystery 
sequence and its somewhat unpleasant incidents, you 
will probably be able to please them with "The Mar- 
riage Chance." There are those who like thrills of 
this more or less sensational order so for them the 
feature will offer a first rate entertainment. 



are well known to get them interested, such as Milton 
Sills, Henry B. Walthall, Tully Marshall, Irene Rich 
and Mitchell Lewis. The title is a good one and can 
be played up with catchlines and your usual announce- 
ments should be enough to take care of it. The picture 
does not warrant unusual exploitation or promises 



The cast is good and there are sufficient names that but should get over with the average audience. 



The Biggest Hit 

PLAYED 35 REGULAR 
LAST WEEK TO Rf COM 

Book, now before yow 



BIGGER THAN 
OVER THE HILL 



fllll 

WILLIAM 

FOX present* 



jift e 



TOWN 




FOX FILM CORPORATION 



tf The Season! 

s 

tOIION PICTURE HOUSES 
1RIAKING BUSINESS 

ose this attraction 

A BOX OFFICE 
SENSATION 





DIRECTED 

by 

HARRY 
M!UARDE 

WHO STAGED 

OVER THE HlLl 

PRINTS 
NOW IN 

BRANCHES 



OX FILM CORPORATION 






—£&>* 



DAILY 



Sunday, January 21, 1923 



Weak Story Material But Production Values Are High 



"DRUMS OF FATE" 
Paramount 

DIRECTOR Charles Maigne 

AUTHOR Stephen F. Whitman 

SCENARIO BY Will M. Ritchey 

CAMERAMAN James Howe 

AS A WHOLE Uneventful except for some 

fairly exciting African uprisings 

STORY Romance of the Enoch Arden variety 

with colorful atmosphere and adventure thrown 
in 

DIRECTION All very fine as far as production, 

photography and handling players is concerned 
but material made it stop there 

PHOTOGRAPHY First rate 

LIGHTINGS Good 

PLAYERS Mary Miles Minter seldom convin- 
cing in emotional roles; Maurice B. Flynn a 
worth while hero with George Fawcett in a 
role that keeps him in the background; others 
Casson Ferguson, Bertram Grassby and Robert 
Cain 

EXTERIORS All right though may not be the 

average conception of an African jungle 

INTERIORS Good 

DETAIL Adequate 

CHARACTER OF STORY Believing her hus- 
band dead, girl marries musician out of pity, 
returning to the former upon musician's death 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,716 feet 

It really does seem an unfortunate piece of business 
that Miss Minter could not have been allowed to live 
happily ever after with her explorer husband since it 
had taken her so long to make up her mind in regard 
to a husband. The opening shot shows her entertain- 
ing the unlucky suitors, probably two dozen of them, 
and then came hero Maurice Flynn from out of darkest 
Africa and won the fair heroine. But that was only the 
very first few feet of "Drums of Fate," with much un- 



certainty and unhappiness destined to fall on the 
shoulders of the pretty young wife. The picture is 
almost silly in its sincerity and it doesn't seem at all 
possible that the young woman, so deeply mourning 
her husband's death, could be goaded into marrying the 
crippled musician out of pity, even considering the 
very obvious sort of union that it was. Nor can you 
believe that it made the young artist happy when his 
bride's affection was restrained to a kiss on his fore- 
head. 

Seriously, Stephen Whitman's novel, "Sacrifice," 
offers quite weak material for the screen and not at 
all an appropriate story for Mary Miles Minter since 
it requires considerable emotional work on her part 
and she is not well suited to this type of role. The 
situations are slight and the development depends 
upon coincidence and illogical twists that could never 
make the story a good entertainment. It moves along 
slowly and without much change of tempo except for 
the African uprising which is realistically staged and 
offers some excitement even though the jungle looks 
very much like other California woodlands. 

Charles Maigne has given the story a splendid pro- 
duction with plenty of scenic investiture and a gener- 
ally pleasing atmosphere. The Venice scene is very 
pretty, as are numerous other sets. The photography 
is excellent and the supporting cast first rate. Maurice 
B. Flynn is always a likeable hero and does very good 
work in this. George Fawcett's role is unworthy of 
him. 

Story: Carol Dolliver marries Larry Teck and they 
are quite happy until Larry is called back to Africa 
where he is captured by natives and reported dead. 
Sometime later Carol's guardian encourages her to 
marry David, his crippled musical protege. Larry 
returns but, finding Carol married and believing her 
happy with David, again goes back to Africa. After 
David's death Carol goes in search of Larry, risks her 
life among the natives, but is repaid by the reunion 
which follows when she finds Larry in a native camp. 



Atmosphere May Appeal to Them But Don't Promise a Lively Offering 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Where they want something a little unusual in the 
way of atmosphere, you may be able to satisfy them 
with "Drums of Fate," or if they prefer a story some- 
what unusual and won't mind that it does not contain 
forceful situations. Very likely the presentation which 
you accord the picture will have a lot to do with get- 
ting it over so if you can secure the right musical 
score and proper effects to accompany the picture, it 
will make a better impression. 



You know best what appeals to your clientele and 
whether or not they will like a picture such as "Drums 
of Fate." Mary Miles Minter is the featured player so 
if she has a following you might use her name and 
those of her supporting cast. Paramount's press sheet 
is complete with suggestions for exploitation if you 
want to make a fuss about the showing. 



THE 



Sunday, January 21, 1923 



5^2 



DAILY 



Good Production Rather Wasted On U ndeserving Material 



"WHILE PARIS SLEEPS" 
Maurice Tourneur Prod. — Hodkinson 

DIRECTOR Maurice Tourneur 

AUTHOR Pan 

SCENARIO BY Not credited 

CAMERAMAN Rene Guissart 

AS A WHOLE Very good production accorded 

commonplace theme that has some gruesome 
twists 

STORY Not particularly attractive material 

although there is much interesting detail in its 
presentation 
DIRECTION Provides thrills of a rather un- 
pleasant nature ; production values are high 

PHOTOGRAPHY Good 

LIGHTINGS Usually good 

PLAYERS Lon Chaney miscast; Mildred Man- 
ning and Jack Gilbert suitable ; others Harden 
Kirkland, Jack MacDonald and F. Farrell Mac- 
Donald 

EXTERIORS Show careful detail 

INTERIORS Fair 

DETAIL Good but occasionally unpleasant 

CHARACTER OF STORY Sculptor, jealous of 

model's suitor, plans with madman to kill the 
latter ; repents in time to save man's life 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 4,850 feet 

The Hodkinson office is unable to state just how 
long ago Maurice Tourneur made this picture, an 
adaptation of Pan's "The Glory of Love," but it is 
rather safe to draw your own conclusions if for no 
other reason than the fact that Lon Chaney is very 
badly cast. It is quite apparent that Tourneur made 
the picture before Chaney came to the fore as a "man 
(if a thousand faces," for instead of having him play the 
part of the madman who models the crimes of the time 
in wax and occasionally shows his art of displaying 
torture through living models, they have Chaney cast 
as a sculptor suffering from an unrequited love for his 



model. Just to think of what Chancy could have done 
with the madman character certainly detracts greatly 
from the role he does portray, a part that is really 
obscure in comparison with the importance of the 
other. 

Other than the interesting detail and good produc- 
tion which Tourneur has accorded the story, there is 
little in "While Paris Sleeps" to make it generally 
attractive. The theme, in the main, is the very time 
worn situation in which a rich father implores the 
girl in love with his son, to prove her devotion by 
giving him up. Regardless of the logic of it, the girl 
makes the sacrifice that is as old as the pictures and 
there is a subsequent reunion. Injected into this is a 
rather unwholesome twist that introduces a sequence 
of some fairly hair-raising scenes, tending to remind 
one of the once famous Eden Musee where the most 
famous criminals and their fiendish acts could be 
found duplicated in wax. 

The idea of the madman presenting living models in 
his pet torturing device is the most gruesome bit and 
the shots of Jack Gilbert shown smouldering on the 
steps charged with electric current are far from what 
the average public expects in their screen entertain- 
ment. Very likely some of this will be edited before 
the picture goes out for general distribution. 

It is a quaint Paris that Tourneur presents and the 
atmosphere is quite appealing with some of the street 
scenes and an inn on the outskirts providing some 
rather pleasing touches. Mildred Manning is the girl. 
She does satisfactory work and the cast, on the whole, 
is adequate. The Jack Gilbert in the picture is John 
Gilbert, Fox star for the past year. 

Story: To please her lover's father, Bebe pretends 
to favor the sculptor Santados, who because of his 
jealousy had contrived to have Marionette, a madman, 
get rid of the lover. At the last minute Santados 
weakens and the lover is saved from a death of torture 
and there is a happy reunion of the pair. 



Will Appeal to Sensation Seekers. Not For a Family Clientele 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



This is one that you had better see for yourself and 
decide what you can do with it. Where they like 
sensational subjects the picture can be used and will 
undoubtedly satisfy them, but it is decidedly unfit for 
family consumption and will not appeal to those who 
object to gruesome or unpleasant things. If you cater 
to a regular patronage you know pretty well what they 
want and if the more or less sensational attractions do 
not appeal to them, this one will hardly do. 



Many will probably come in if you want to exploit 
the picture on the strength of Chaney's name but they 
will surely wonder why he has been so miscast. In 
view of the disappointment they are due for it may 
not be advisable to get them in through playing up 
Chaney. On the other hand it will go big with sensa- 
tion seekers who will find a thrill in the "Chamber of 
Horrors" sequence. 



THE 



■3tfr1 



DAILY 



Sunday, January 21, 1923 



Not At All the Right Vehicle for Jones Nor a Good Entertainment 



Charles Jones in 

"THE FOOTLIGHT RANGER" 

Fox 

DIRECTOR Scott Dunlap 

AUTHOR Dorothy Yost 

SCENARIO BY Dorothy Yost 

CAMERAMAN Dev Dennings 

AS A WHOLE A very tame offering for this 

star, wholly unlike what they expect from him 
STORY Gives Jones quite a vacation; poor 

drama that isn't always wholesome either 
DIRECTION Fair; didn't do anything that 

would lift material out of the ordinary class 

PHOTOGRAPHY All right 

LIGHTINGS Adequate 

STAR Does well enough but belongs in western 

dramas 
SUPPORT A satisfactory supporting company 

includes Fritzi Brunette, Lillian Langdon and 

Henry Barrows 

EXTERIORS Suitable 

INTERIORS All right 

DETAIL Ample 

CHARACTER OF STORY Ranger, in love with 

actress, follows her to New York where he saves 

her from attack by her manager 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 4,729 feet 

Wherever the Fox scenario department saw possi- 
bilities in this story as a vehicle for Charles Jones 
isn't at all obvious, not so much that Jones doesn't 
handle the role he is given satisfactorily, but that the 
whole atmosphere and plot does not suit his person- 
ality nor is it the thing he does best. Folks have come 
to look for live westerns with plenty of good action 
as the Charles Jones features, but they are due for a 
disappointment in "The Footlight Ranger." 

The role of Bill Moreland gives the star very little 
real opportunities and hardly any chance for his typ- 
ical line of action. There is a fight or two but very 



tame affairs in comparison with what you usually get 
from Jones. The idea of a regular cowboy hero fol- 
lowing an actress around with nothing particularly 
exciting happening makes a slow-moving and rather 
dull picture and even when the girl becomes the sub- 
ject of the manager's unwelcome attentions and Jones 
is kept busy protecting her, things are not over inter- 
esting and the story drags along to an equally tame 
finish. There is no suspense nor attempt to build 
toward the climax. 

And the situations are not what might be called alto- 
gether wholesome. They make it very plain what the 
manager's intentions are toward the girl he plans to 
star in a Broadway show and the private dining room 
sequence at the notorious inn isn't exactly what folks 
will want their young daughters to see. All of which 
emphasizes the fact that the story is wholly inappro- 
priate and unsuited to Jones, from whom his admir- 
ers have come to expect clean, wholesome western 
entertainments. 

It is very amusing to read the synopsis contained in 
the Fox press sheet and compare it with the story as 
it appears on the screen. Evidently it was written be- 
fore the picture was made, or else the one that wrote 
it took a poor guess at what the picture contained. 
Some of the posters included on the press sheet also 
indicate incidents that never occur, such, for instance, 
as the fire at the oil field. There is no such sequence 
in the picture. Jones does good work, but it is hard 
to figure him in a picture of this kind. 

Story : Bill Moreland meets Janet Ainslee, a strand- 
ed actress, and by selling his dogs secures money to 
pay her way back to New York. Later Bill goes to 
the city and again meets Janet, who is about to be 
starred on Broadway in a show backed by David 
Marsh, whose attentions to Janet are unwelcome. How 
Bill saves Janet and they go back west together com- 
pletes it. 



Will Disappoint Star's Admirers Who Expect Action 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Probably Jones' admirers will accept it without much 
fuss but they are sure to wonder why he was ever 
given such an ill-suited story as this one. It all de- 
pends upon how well they like the star. Of course if 
you don't have to worry about regular patronage, you 
can use your own judgment. Probably the story would 
just appeal to your folks. You know them best. 



But make it clear just what sort of a story this is 
and you won't make it very clear if you use the va- 
riety of stills and posters suggested in the Fox press 
sheet. They look more like the usual Jones offering. 
Also do not reprint the synopsis as printed in the press 
sheet. It is not the story as it appears on the screen. 



THE 



Sunday, January 21, 1923 



-<5^ 



DAILV 



Sea Picture With Action and Thrills Offers Good Entertainment 



"ALL THE BROTHERS WERE VALIANT" 

Metro 

DIRECTOR Irvin Willat 

AUTHOR Ben Ames Williams 

SCENARIO BY Julien Josephson 

CAMERAMAN Robert Kurrle 

AS A WHOLE Virile sea adventure picture 

which offers fine thrills, unusual action and 
splendid atmosphere 

STORY Of the Jack London type with strong 

situations and many worthwhile moments 
DIRECTION First rate; provides fine atmo- 
sphere and action aboard whaling vessel has a 
wallop 

PHOTOGRAPHY Excellent 

LIGHTINGS Good 

PLAYERS A splendid cast with fine co-opera- 
tion among the players; Malcolm McGregor 
comes up front with fine dramatic performance ; 
Lon Chaney good, as usual, and Billie Dove a 
pleasing heroine 

EXTERIORS Beautiful water shots 

INTERIORS Few 

DETAIL Suitable 

CHARACTER OF STORY Young sea captain 

proves himself the master when he quells mu- 
tiny among his men, aided by brother previously 
a traitor 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 6,265 feet 

There is a big majority of picture patrons that favor 
virile sea stories of the Jack London-"Sea Wolf" va- 
riety. And they couldn't ask for anything better than 
Ben Ames Williams' "All the Brothers Were Val- 
iant," a delightful, adventurous tale of the water that 
contains all the elements of popular appeal consistent 
with the type of entertainment which it offers. The 
picture is a first rate entertainment of its kind and 
should please a great many. 



Besides a pleasing romantic angle, the many fine 
bits of action and some worthwhile thrills, as well as 
slight comic relief, the story contains one particularly 
notable bit of character development in the person of 
Captain Joel Shore. In this connection especially, 
Director Willat has shown considerable skill. From 
the outset the spectator realizes that the youth is des- 
tined to be the hero of the story, but Willat's deft 
handling of the character does not hint as to how it 
will be brought about, nor do you know whether Joel 
is strictly a weakling or just habitually reticent. Of 
course, much credit is clue Malcolm McGregor, who 
comes well to the fore for his work in the role of Joel 
Shore. McGregor makes the character real and there 
is plenty of force in his portrayal. 

Irvan Willat has injected delightful atmosphere and 
the scenes aboard the whaling vessel are indeed pleas 
ing. And the last two reels contain sufficient action 
to thoroughly make up for a rather slow beginning. 
There is real action in the mutiny sequence, and the 
attempted rescue of Mark Shore by his brother Joel 
in the shark infested waters, and earlier in the picture 
the killing of a whalu are also fine. The interest is well 
sustained and with the exception of being just a trifle 
slow in getting started, the story moves along at a 
good pace all the way. 

Billie Dove photographs very well and is a pleasing 
heroine. Lon Chaney gives his usual splendid per- 
formance as Mark Shore and Robert McKim is the 
heavy. The cast, on the whole, is quite satisfactory. 

Story : The whaling vessel returns without its cap- 
tain, Mark Shore. Joel, a younger brother, is made 
captain and his bride sails with him. They find Mark, 
who explains how he had been ill with fever and 
nursed by a native girl. Mark incites the crew to 
mutiny when Joel refuses to return to the island where 
Mark had hidden valuable pearls belonging to traders. 
How Mark eventually comes to Joel's rescue and order 
is preserved is followed by Mark's death in the sea. 



Will Please a Big Majority and Will Stand Some Promises 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Here is a good strong sea story with adventure, ac- 
tion, thrills and romance, that should go big with your 
audience. If you know they are particularly fond of 
this type of entertainment, it should be worth your 
while to make an extra fuss about the showing and 
let them know what "All the Brothers Were Valiant" 
is all about. The title itself isn't sufficient to indicate 
the type of story it is, so use plenty of stills in the 



lobby and whatever exploitation you think necessary 
to acquaint them with the picture. 

You can promise that Irvin Willat has supplied a 
fine production and use the name of the author. Of 
course Lon Chaney's name is another asset and oth- 
ers who deserve mention are Malcolm McGregor, 
Billie Dove and Robert McKim. The picture is worth 
your effort to get it over and get your folks in. 






SECOND FID 



Written and directed by 
FRANK TUTTLE 

Photographed and supervised 
by FRED. WALLER JR 

a TUTTLE-WALLER 
PRODUCTION 



Hit 

as 

JimBradlcy^iGM 





and finally took his girl / 




Qlways Played 

"second 

FIDDLE' 



Herbert Bradley arrived 

home from college, handsome, 

polished, and possessing all the 

social graces. His awkward 

brother, Jim, who had always been 

regarded as a "Second Fiddle," was 

relegated to the background. 

Herbert immediately took posses- 
sion of Jim's room and threw out all 
his belongings, to which Jim said 
nothing. 

Jim permitted his automobile to be monopolized 
by the egotistical Herbert, who utilized it to take 
Jim's sweetheart driving. 

Finally, Herbert tried to steal Jim's sweetheart. 

BUT — the worm turned! 

Just how Jim finally asserts himself and proves 
his manhood in a crucial test, and wins the girl 
of his dreams, is told in this enthralling and grip- 
ping film drama. 



HODKINSON 

PICTURES 





MOTION PICTURE NEWS: "Second 
Fiddle" may be put down as a likely 
attraction. 

MOTION PICTURE WORLD: This 
is a feature that should please every 
class of patrons. It has heart inter- 
est, thrilling suspense, and Glenn 
Hunter in a most appealing role. It 
is a superior attraction that promises 
satisfaction to the box-office. 

EXHIBITORS TRADE REVIEW: 

There is no doubt in our minds that 
it will be well received wherever 
shown. 

MORNING TELEGRAPH: Glenn 
Hunter does his usual splendid work 
as Jim Bradley, the "second fiddle." 
He is an actor who possesses unusual 



charm, rare intelligence and an acute 
sense of comedy. 

EXHIBITOR HERALD: "Second 
Fiddle" has the appeal of a well-told 
story, natural and picturesque New 
England scenery, and it will please the 
majority of picture-goers. 

FILM DAILY: Has elements that 
will appeal to a good majority. Con- 
tains effective thrills, enough action, a 
first-rate atmosphere and a cast that 
does very good work. 

HARRISON'S REPORTS: "Second 
Fiddle" is so well handled, and so 
appealing in its humanness, that it 
is a thoroughly pleasing offering. 
Glenn Hunter does good work; the 
same is true of Mary Astor. 



ourcratrons 




Mil Like, it! 



' IIIIIIM— I1IIBII— ■IIIIIIWIIIII 

Sunday, January 21, 1923 



THE 



l~~*S 




13 



Mary Garr in Another "Mother" Role That That Doesn't Approach the Others 



"THE CUSTARD CUP" 
Fox 

DIRECTOR Herbert Brenon 

AUTHOR Florence Bingham Livingston 

SCENARIO BY G. Marion Burton 

CAMERAMAN Tom Malloy 

AS A WHOLE Mostly human interest stuff with 

some good characterizations but little plot 
STORY Made up of good incident and detail 

but not particularly strong in situations 

DIRECTION Brings out characterizations ef- 
fectively and offers one good thrill ; occasionally 
draggy 

PHOTOGRAPHY Good 

LIGHTINGS All right 

PLAYERS Mary Carr featured in one of her 

typical "mother" roles ; Miriam Battista handles 
an important part very well; others adequate 

EXTERIORS Suitable 

INTERIORS Appropriate 

DETAIL Occasionally overdone 

CHARACTER OF STORY Kind-hearted woman 

of the tenements is implicated in counterfeit 
scheme but saved by secret service man 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 6,166 feet 

For those who like plenty of human interest in their 
entertainment, "The Custard Cup," the first of the 
new series of Fox specials, will undoubtedly prove 
satisfying. It does not contain a very prominent or 
weighty plot nor any particularly oustanding situa- 
tions. Instead it is composed of incidents of the 
human interest variety with some rather effective 
characterizations. The action is very slight and with 
the exception of an excursion boat fire and the last reel 
raid on the counterfeiting den, "The Custard Cup" 
doesn't boast of thrills. 



The early reels are consumed entirely with acquaint- 
ing you with the people of the Custard Cup, a group of 
little two-family tenements clustered around an oval 
driveway. There is Mrs. Percy, who hides her laziness 
under a feigned illness and is supported by her daugh- 
ter Lorene, in love with Dick Chase, a young police- 
man. There is also old Wopple, a cranky old bachelor ; 
the Bosleys, a mysterious couple and "Penzie" (Mary 
Carr) a motherly person who lives for her three adopt- 
ed children. Next to Penzie.in importance, is Lettie, a 
little girl she picked from the dumps. Lettie's tem- 
peramental displays consume many feet of film and 
while this gives Miriam Battista (Lettie) unusually 
fine opportunities to show what a good little actress 
she is, Director Brenon overdoes it. This is especially 
so in the sequence where Lettie eats a whole pan of 
cookies and pays for her gluttony with a stomach ache. 

Throughout the mass of human interest touches and 
characterization you are given a glimpse here and there 
of a counterfeiting scheme and the participants but this 
angle of the story is seldom logical or convincing. 
Just why an accomplished counterfeiter should be 
daring enough to circulate his "phoney" bills on an 
excursion boat isn't at all sensible, granting, of course, 
that the counterfeiter knows anything. Nor is it likely 
that he would even be heartless enough to throw his 
burning counterfeit bills on the deck endangering the 
lives of so many. But it supplies a thrill which has 
been fairly well done. Director Brenon loaded the 
old steamer Mary Patten with extras who could swim 
and staged this sequence adequately with a miniature 
representing the steamer in flames. 

Mary Carr injects considerable sympathy and feeling 
into one of her typical mother roles and Miriam Bat- 
tista has a good deal to do as the tempestuous little 
Lettie. There are two other entertaining youngsters 
and the cast, on the whole, is capable. 



Will Probably Please an Average Crowd and Admirers of Sentiment 



Box Office Analysis 

Where they like heart interest and human interest 
stuff you can rely on "The Custard Cup" to satisfy 
them. They will like Mary Carr and her devotion to 
the three little children whom she has adopted to take 
the place of her own that died and they will be delight- 
ed with the fighting little Lettie which Miriam Bat- 
tista makes very real and convincing. But for those 
who are more critical you may have difficulty pleasing 



for the Exhibitor 

them with this one since it lacks strong situations and 
suspense. 

You can talk about the excursion boat fire if you 
want to attract them by promises of thrills but don't 
go too strong on this angle for the fire is the only real 
bit of action in the picture. Of course your big talking 
point is the name of Mary Carr, the famed mother of 
"Over the Hill" and "Silver Wings." Her admirers 
will surely want to see the picture. 



14 



THE 



■c&< 



DAILY 



£Z6I '\Z /vjenuEf 'Aupung 



Pleasing Romance in Picture That Offers Good Entertainment 



"THE GHOST PATROL" 

Universal 

DIRECTOR Nat Ross 

AUTHOR Sinclair Lewis 

SCENARIO BY Raymond Schrock 

CAMERAMAN Ben Reynolds 

AS A WHOLE A satisfying short entertainment 

pleasingly portrayed by a capable cast and 
nicely produced 

STORY Contains interesting atmosphere and 

situations that have been rather carefully 
handled 

DIRECTION All right; sustains interest very 

well and tells story smoothly 

PHOTOGRAPHY Good 

LIGHTINGS First rate 

PLAYERS Bessie Love an appealing heroine 

and Ralph Graves tries very hard but is not es- 
pecially well suited; George Nichols very good, 
also Geo. Williams and Max Davidson 

EXTERIORS . . Settings, but realistic 

INTERIORS Suitable 

DETAIL Ample 

CHARACTER OF STORY Daughter of delica- 
tessen keeper is happy with boy she loves after 
father's objections are overcome 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 4,228 feet 

Besides an appealing romance there is some effective 
heart interest touches in "The Ghost Patrol," a story 
by Sinclair Lewis, in which Universal is featuring 
Bessie Love and Ralph Graves. The idea of the 
parental objection to a daughter's love match has 
served as the basic situation of many screen plays in 
the past but this time it is worked in, in connection 
with interesting by-plot that includes some effective 
heart interest. 

Director Ross has provided a satisfying production, 
injected a good deal of pleasing atmosphere and 
handled the players to good advantage. The down- 



town district known as "Little Hell" is nicely pictured 
and while the scenes are apparently studio affairs they 
are quite real looking and the photography and light- 
ings have been given considerable careful attention, 
especially in the street scenes. 

The story unfolds smoothly and Ross has succeeded 
in sustaining the interest satisfactorily. Besides the 
romance of the delicatessen proprietor's daughter and 
the rowdy who has reformed there is a pleasing 
sequence devoted to Don Dorgan, the policeman, who 
for years has patroled "Little Hell" and kept order 
through his kindly manner rather than by domineering 
them. There are some fine heart interest bits in con- 
nection with the enforced retirement of Dorgan by 
the new police chief and his subsequent secret patrols 
when he dodges the officer who has replaced him. The 
twist which comes at the end, with Dorgan re-instated 
and made captain, will probably not be as much of a 
surprise as it is intended to be. The audience rather 
expects this to happen in the natural course of events 

ading to the happy ending. 

Bessie Love is thoroughly appealing as the girl who 
finally braves her father's anger and goes to her lover 
even though it means that she cannot go back to her 
father. Ralph Graves works hard as the lover but he 
is not particularly well cast since the part requires con- 
siderable emotional acting and Graves isn't able to 
carry it over convincingly. Character bits that are 
interesting are contributed by George Nichols, George 
Williams and Max Davidson. 

Story: Kugler refuses to allow his daughter Effie 
to marry Terry Rafferty, one of the idlers of "Little 
Hell," although Terry was on the way to reforming. 
In despair Terry gets drunk and assaults the political 
boss and is sent to jail for a year. Upon his release 
Terry is slugged by one of the boss' men. Dorgan, the 
policeman, friend of both Effie and Terry, brings word 
of the accident to Effie and upon Terry's* recovery 
there is an all-around reconciliation. 



Title Can Be Exploited and Use Name s of Featured Players 



The average audience will like "The Ghost Patrol" 
because it contains elements of appeal that usually 
attract the majority of picture goers and it is short, and 
to the point. For those who like romantic stories 
"The Ghost Patrol" will prove particularly interesting. 
It has exploitation angles that can be taken advantage 
of such as the names of the players including Bessie 
Love and Ralph Graves, who are featured, and also 



Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 

George Nichols and Geo. B. Williams who offer thor- 
oughly worth while characterizations. 

Play up the title with catchlines and tell them about 
the policeman who refused to be retired. Universale 
press sheet offers interesting suggestions for stunt 
advertising that should easily attract the attention of 
your pepole. 



THE 



Sunday, January 21, 1923 



-,sefr* 



DAILV 



.5 



Interesting and Novel Offering Dealing With South Sea Island People 



"HEAD HUNTERS OF THE SOUTH SEAS" 

Associated Exhibitors 

DIRECTOR Martin Johnson 

AUTHOR Real narrative 

EDITED AND TITLED BY Arthur Hoerl 

CAMERAMAN Martin Johnson 

AS A WHOLE A novel entertainment that will 

appeal to those who like something a little dif- 
ferent 
STORY Deals with customs and habits of na- 
tives in cannibal islands of the South Seas 

DIRECTION Includes much interesting detail 

in connection with island inhabitants 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS Good 

PLAYERS Martin Johnson, Mrs. Johnson and 

the natives 

EXTERIORS Numerous picturesque views 

INTERIORS None 

DETAIL Pleasing 

CHARACTER OF STORY Explorations in 

jungle lands 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,000 feet 

There is much that is interesting and enlightening 
in this latest edition of Martin Johnson's jungle ad- 
ventures and while "Head Hunters of the South Seas" 
does not contain as many thrilling bits as his "Among 
the Cannibals of the South Sea Islands," there is prob- 
ably more interesting detail and intimate views of the 
habits and customs of these savage people in this pic- 
ture than in the other. The offering is a pleasing va- 
riation from the regular routine screen entertainment 
and should prove popular where they welcome an 
occasional change. 



In "Head Hunters of the South Seas" Mr. Johnson 
and his plucky little wife return to the land of Malekula 
where the Johnsons met with hostility upon their last 
visit and narrowly escaped with their lives. Chief 
Nagapate seems inclined to be more friendly this time 
and Johnson secured some interesting results when he 
showed the natives motion pictures of themselves 
which he had taken during his last visit. Despite the 
difficulty of securing the pictures at night without 
proper lighting facilities, the pictures are fairly clear 
and the effect of "seeing themselves as others see 
them" is an interesting touch. The last seen of Chief 
Nagapate he is pushing off in a small craft thoroughly 
satisfied with an umbrella presented to him by Mrs. 
Johnson. 

The travelers leave Malekula and arrive at the island 
of Santo, which is inhabited by strange diminutive 
people who had to be dragged out of their jungle 
haunts to pose before the camera. They live in the 
trees and are about as close a relation to the monkey 
as any human that you have ever seen. Their ma- 
neuvers in the trees, at a distance, would lead you to 
believe they were monkeys, although they probably 
are not quite as agile as the pictures would have you 
think. It is obvious that these scenes are run at a 
much faster speed to give you that impression. 

Many of the close-ups of the natives are of particu- 
lar interest and the exaggerated headdresses will prove 
most interesting. Besides pictures of the island people, 
Johnson has also secured many very beautiful views of 
the tropical islands that include a scene of a volcano 
eruption and one picture which Johnson claims to be 
the first photographic record of an earthquake. There 
are also many very attractive water views that gives 
the offering considerable pictorial value. 



Should Be an Agreeable Variation for Your Program 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Exhibitors who like to vary their entertainment will 
find a very pleasing and novel offering in "Head Hunt- 
ers of the South Seas," another expedition into the 
tropical islands by Mr. and Mrs. Martin Johnson, who 
have previously secured many unusual pictures of the 
South Sea tribes. You can make promises for the nov- 
elty of the picture and get them interested by catch- 
lines such as: "In Head Hunters of the South Seas" 
you will see how a tribe of cannibals acted when they 



saw their first motion picture, a picture of themselves." 
If your folks saw the last Johnson picture, "Among 
the Cannibals of the South Sea Islands," they will 
undoubtedly be interested in the latest- adventure and 
your lobby can easily be dressed up to attract their 
attention. Besides the novelty value of the offering, 
talk about its pictorial appeal and of course it is edu- 
cational, as well. 



Short Stuff 



"Fighting Blood"— George O'Hara— F. B. O. 



'The Champeen"— Hal Roach— Pathe 



Type of production 2 reel comedy drama Type of production 2 reel kid comedy 



A brand new series that looks like ready money and lots of 
it in the box office. H. C. Witwer, the noted slang writer 
whose contributions to Collier's Weekly and other publications 
have made his name a household word is the author, and the 
first of the series of two reelers based upon the Witwer stories 
were given a preview last week. In many instances the pro- 
ductions savor somewhat of the famous and very popular series 
called "The Leather Pushers'' released by Universal. There 
is a considerable difference between these productions, how- 
ever. This series shows a large variety of young folks and 
the types especially are very well selected. Production values 
are unusual for two reelers and while the fighting and boxing 
episodes appear in each of the two reelers there is not as 
much of the actual fighting or the exhibition of the naked body 
as in the earlier sequences of "The Leather Pushers." There 
is a lot of comedy introduced and if the remainder of the 
series live up to what developed in the first three stories they 
are going to prove a mighty good bet. 

Clara Horton plays opposite the star and Mai St. Clair di- 
rected. Some exceptionally good camera work appears for 
which Lee Garmes is given the credit. Nearly all of the 
stories dwell upon instances in the development of the career 
of "Six Cylinder Smith" a nom-de-plume taken by a former 
dispenser of soda water. The love interest is very well carried 
out and as a whole the series should prove one of the best bets 
of the season for short stuff. 



"Mr. Hyppo"— Hal Roach— Pathe 

Type of production 1 reel comedy 

In this week's release, Paul Parrott is seen as a hypnotist. 
His youthful assistant, Jobyna Ralston, tries her best to make 
the performance go over well but in spite of their combined 
efforts the audience is getting suspicious. A hypnotist "pro- 
fessor" whom Paul owes for a course of lessons is seated in 
the audience and takes this chance to get even. The offering 
is a bit ahead of the usual run of this series, but depends 
chiefly upon slapstick for its humor. 



"By Lantern Light" — Bruce — Educational 

Type of production 1 reel scenic-drama 

This, one of Robert C. Bruce's new series of Wilderness 
Tales, is one of the finest short reel secnics seen this season. 
It combines the exquisite background of the Oregon sea coast 
with its rocky cliffs and caverns with an appealing tale of two 
little boys who, caught in a cave by the incoming tide, are 
hunted for during the entire night by their anxious family. 
Artistic in the extreme are some of the shots which give 
silhouette-like effects to the figures caught in the waning light. 
The seas shots have a haunting beauty that will not be quickly 
forgotten. This is a short reel that can be played up as well 
as the feature with which it is used in conjunction, with the 
full assurance that it will please a critical audience. The photo- 
graphy, for which John M. Lemond is given credit, is among 
the best yet done in this type of production, but besides the 
beauty of the scenery which in itself is enough to hold the 
attention, the little story is very well done and holds the 
attention closely. 



If you have not played the previous Our Gang Comedies 
start in with this one and if you have played them you won't 
need to be told to play this. In either event, your crowd will 
love it. The only adult in the entire film is a friendly police- 
man who is seen for a minute or two, while he catches Sun- 
shine Sammy swiping apples. He tells him he must either 
pay the grocer a dollar or go to jail. So Sammy arranges 
for a ring battle between Mickey Daniels and Jackie Davis who 
are both in love with a sweet little miss who smiles on each. 
There is some very good stuff before the actual fight, when 
both Romeos rush to get their sweetie a bottle of soda and 
crash into each other with disastrous results. But a great deal 
of fun is contained in the fight scenes. Held in an old barn 
with planks for seats, the youthful audience is constantly being 
unexpectedly dumped whenever they applaud. The champs 
fight in and out of the ring. Both have been told privately by 
Sammy that their opponent would "lie down in the second 
round." But when that time comes, each is surprised at the 
other's failure to do so. Just then another little boy invites 
Juliet to go for a soda and the fight ends with both fighters 
concentrating on the common enemy. 



"Moonblind" — Bruce — Educational 

Type of production 1 reel scenic-drama 

"Moonblind" is the first of a new series of Bruce Wilderness 
Tales, released by Educational, and the beauty of the mountain 
tops in the opening shots is enough to make one gasp. Giant 
mountains with peaks in the clouds, snow covered ravines, 
and grass covered hills are the background against which the 
little drama is enacted. The story is simple but delivered 
forcefully. Two prospectors are searching for gold. One, 
bothered by what his partner calls "moonblindness," ties a 
handkerchief over his eyes. His partner slips down a cliff and 
injures his legs and the blind partner finally crawls down the 
cliff and reaches him, only to drag him around all through the 
night in an effort to find their camp. The suspense is held ex- 
ceedingly well. Dawn finds them both exhausted but his 
prayer for help is answered by means of the sun shining on a 
tin pan which a nearby sheepman sees. He is rescued only 
to find that it was all a dream and his partner is perfectly well. 



"Keep 'Em Home"— Carter DeHaven— F. B. O. 

Type of production 2 reel comedy 

Mr. and Mrs. Carter DeHaven are supplying the short 
reel comedy market with some first rate humorous subjects 
that should be popular with exhibitors. The type of comedy 
which they present is of the domestic order, and contains 
a good deal that make the pictures appealing to the average 
audience. They usually consist of "knocks" at the usual 
squabbles of a young married couple and in "Keep 'Em Home" 
the idea is readily guessed from the title. The young wife 
doubts the absence of her husband with the unsatisfactory 
"business" excuse causing the trouble. The wife's plan to 
make hubby jealous and her subsequent suspicion when she 
discovers powder on his coat sleeve lead to complications 
that offer pleasing comedy entertainment and will be liked 
by a big majority. 



STUDIO FOR SALE 



25 Minutes from Times Square. 



Every Modern device. Must be 
Sold at once. Producers should 
investigate this proposition. Terms 
can be arranged for responsible 
parties. 



Address: R-291 
care of The Film Daily 



Associated Exhibitors. 



FOREIGN REPRESENTATIVE 
SIDNEY GARRETT 



ARTHUR S KANE, PRES. 



Physical Distributors 

Pat he Exchange 



^-dgvidA pralde from lhe7rade Vreu ^reeL a wonderful picture 

FlorenceVidor 

CONQUERING THE WOMAN 

From %e Fascnat.no Novbl By HENRY C. ROWLAND 

A KING V1D0I\ PRODUCTION 7 



"The picture opens with view* of life 
at a seaside resort near Paris and we see 
Miss Vidor aquaplaning, swimming and 
indulging in other red-blooded sports. 
The action shifts to America and then 
quickly to the South Seas. The fights 
which David Butler puts up during the 
'shanghaiing* moments are real stuff. The 
island life is well pictured and there are 
a number of amusing situations here. 

"The chase of two ships through the 
seas is a bit of excitement. Miss Vidor 
and Mr. Butler do most of the work in 
the picture and do it well. The support- 
ing cast is adequate. The photography 
is clear and artistic, while the subtitles 
snappy and excellently worded." 



1 



are 



Motion Picture 

News 



"The picture is so good to look at and 
made up of such a variety of interesting 
scenes that will please, that the more or 
less stereotyped plot 'will not detract as 
much from the feature's entertainment 
value as it might under a less careful 
production. King Vidor has secured 
numerous pleasing locations that have 
been artistically photographed and the 
atmosphere throughout is one of pictorial 
appeal. Florence Vidor's pleas- 
ing personality and ability to hold her 
audience regardless of what she has to do, 
is another redeeming feature for Henry 
C. Rowland's theme." 







»MMLY- 



;A-BKOOuni 
Authority 



"Florence Vidor has always been one of 
this reviewer's screen favorites. She soothes the 
eye and satisfies the intelligence. Ear rings, neg- 
ligees and exaggerated eyelids have not figured 
unduly in her success. And so it is easy to be 
entertained when Miss Vidor fills the camera eye. 
'Conquering the Woman* is entertaining, 
sprightly and well cast." 

33)eilomin03Iele!3irapb 






"Florence Vidor in 'Conquering the Woman' is a good, 
entertaining feature, built along a theme that is 
familiar, but which is, at the same time, thoroughly 
pleasing in its unf oldment and picturization. David 
Butler plays the hero role and is well cast. The 
picture was directed by King Vidor from a story 
by Henry C. Rowland. Six reels. 

"This newest Florence Vidor feature should not 
fail to register pleasantly with any audience. There is a 
genuine, pleasing vein to the story which makes the pic- 
ture satisfying entertainment of a light, easy-to-follow 
variety. 

"Miss Vidor is appealing and winsome at all times 
and in selecting David Butler to play opposite her, in the 
role of the hero, Director Vidor made a particularly 
effective choice. In this story the two make a great 
combination." EXHIBITOR 



IIEIMJ) 



iTHE 

tie BRADSTREET 
• FILMDOM 





^recognizee 
Authority 




XXIII No. 21 



Monday, January 22, 1923 



Price 5 Cent* 



7 or Release Plan 

consin Exhibitors Favor Ex- 
libitor Distribution — Talk of 
Censors There 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

ilwaukee— The M. P. T. O. of 
consin held a two-day convention 

last week. Officers of the The- 
Owners Dist. Corp., were in- 
d to attend the convention, and 
jecial order of business was de- 
ed to enable them to explain the 
is of the corporation. 
William A. True and W. D. Bur- 
l brought out what they thought 
ild be advantages to the ex- 
tors. A number of theater own- 
discussed the proposition, and bv 
sing vote the convention adopted 

following resolution: 

Vhereas, the board of directors of the 
on Picture Theater Owners of Amerca, 

endorsed the formation of an inde- 
ent exhibitor-owned distribution coi- 
tion, and 

Vhereas, motion picture theater owners 
rwhere are in favor of such a move as 
atter of business protection, 
'herefore, be it resolved, by the Motion 
ire Theater Owners of Wisconsin, in 
ing assembled at Milwaukee, Friday, 
19, 1923. that we heartily commend the 
ation of the Theater Owners Distribut- 
~orporation, endorse its service proposals, 
pledge the support of this organization 
he furtherance of these purposes, and 

all theater owners in Wisconsin and 
rhere, to give the fullest measure of 
tance to this corporation." 

resident F. J. McWilliams was 
fined to his home in Madison by 
ess, and vice president J. H. Sil- 
an, of Milwaukee, presided. 
'he legislative committee reported 
t certain elements were consider- 

the matter of introducing a cen- 
ship bill at Madison, and urged 
t united action be taken to prevent 
passage. 

in engrossed resolution was pre- 
ted to former president Joseph 
}de, of Kenosha, expressive of the 
reciation of the theater owners 

his services and the advances 
ie by the state organization under 

direction. 

. resolution of sympathy was 
ered sent to Mrs. Wallace Reid. 



jrauman's "Met" Opens Jan. 26 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

os Angeles — Sid Grauman's Met- 
mlitan theater is scheduled to open 
: 26. 



M. P. D. A. Ball 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

os Angeles — The Motion Picture 
Victor's Assoc, will hold their an- 
v ball in the Alexandria Hotel, 
17. 




"What will be written in screen history as a masterpiece of its kind is 
offered in Elmer Clifton's 'DOWN TO THE SEA IN SHIPS.' It will 
be talked about as one of the sensations of the year," says Motion Pic- 
ture News. It's a Hodkinson Picture. — Advt. 



The Vision 

Who, in the entire motion picture industry has it? 
Who, in the entire industry indicates they have it? 

Under normal conditions from five to ten million people 
enter picture theaters every day in this country. Even with 
the minimum figures, here is a task worthy of the best minds; 
the best intellect, and the keenest of understanding. Imagine 
what it would be to feed an army of five million men daily — 
and then attempt to appreciate what it means to satisfy the 
appetites of that same number of humans with amusement. 
It is a real task ; and an important one. 

If the entire population of Greater New York — which is 
approximately over five millions — were taken as an example of 
the picture going public, and this army marched past the cor- 
ner of Broadway and 42nd Street, 16 people to a row, it would 
take about 3^ days to pass. 

The statistics showing the amount of food consumed by 
these people runs into enormous figures. There are no statistics 
as to their entertainment. There are some figures, of course, 
but they are meaningless. There are also the production charts 
of the various companies. These prove conclusively what is 
being given the American public as picture entertainment. 
Unfortunately these lists are cluttered with the names of many 
pictures which "get nowhere." They are released, but that's 
all it amounts to. Then there are certain types of pictures 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Walker Suing 

Directed to File New Complaint In 

Suit Against M. P. T. O. For 

Fees 

Supreme Court Justice Wagner 
has signed an order directing State 
Senator James J. Walker to file a 
new complaint in his suit against 
members of the M. P. T. O. of A., 
to recover $6,262 alleged to be due. 
Senator Walker brought his action 
last summer and named as defend- 
ants Sydney S. Cohen, William A. 
True, Edward Fay, Marcus Loew, 
Samuel I. Berman, Charles L. 
O'Reilly, John Mannheimer, Wil- 
liam D. Burford and William A. 
Steffes. 

The complaint alleged that Senator 
Walker was hired as national counsel 
for the organization at $1,000 a 
month and expenses in August, 1920, 
and performed his services until May 
10 last, when his employment was 
terminated. He wants $1,000 for 
each month from November, 1921, 
to last May. and $262 disbursements. 

Gilbert & Gilbert as attorneys for 
True, Burford and Steffes, asked that 
Senator Walker be compelled to file 
a new complaint on the ground that 
he alleged that he was employed by 
the defendants and "others," and he 
failed to name the "others" as de- 
fendants also. Justice Walker upheld 
this contention. 



"The Christian" Showing Tomorrow 

Goldwyn will give a special pre- 
sentation of "The Christian" at the 
Capitol tomorrow morning. The pic- 
ture is expected to run two weeks at 
the theater. 



Getting the New York Angle 

To improve relations between the 
New York office and field managers, 
F. M. Brockell, of First National, has 
perfected a plan whereby each district 
manager will spend at least a month 
here learning distribution from the 
New York office. H. A. Bandy is 
the first. 



Contract Up 

Katherine MacDonald Working on 
Last Picture for Schulberg— 
First National Release 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Katherine Mac- 
Donald is at work on "Chastity, her 
last picture for B. P. Schulberg and 
First National release. Victor 
Schertzinger is directing the picture 
which will be completed in several 

We jt is understood that there will be 
no renewal of the contract, so far as 
Schulberg is concerned. 



THE 



■3&H 



DAILY 



Monday, January 22, 19 



pBSADSTRBT ^ 
o/"FHXDOM# Ty 




Vol. XXIII No. 21 (Monday, Jan. 22, 1923! Price 5 Cents 



Copyright 1923, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 
J. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager ; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
filtered at second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
tie act of March 3, 1879 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
Months, 15.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$13.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 

DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St, New York, 

N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-45S2-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 

6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 

1603. 
Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 

soan. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 

Ave., London, W. 1. 
Paris Repreaentative^ — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Cliehy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau, Prague (Czecho-Slo- 

vakia), Wenzelsplati. 



Quotations 



High Low Close 
East. Kod. 95 ^ 93 % 95 
F. P.-L. . . 85 8234 S3y 2 

do pfd Not 

Goldwyn .. SV 8 5% 5% 
Griffith Not 

Loew's ... isy 2 18% isy 2 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 



Sales 

1,000 

20,400 

quoted 

900 

quoted 

1,500 



Bushman in Films Again 
Francis X. Bushman and Beverly 
Bayne will appear in Betty Blythe's 
latest vehicle, "The Garden of De- 
sire." 



Grainger Closes Buffalo Deal 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Buffalo— "The Christian" and "The 
Strangers' Banquet" have been book- 
ed for Shea's Hippodrome. J. R. 
Grainger closed these deals per- 
sonally. 



Protest Brooklyn Theater 
The residents of Tompkins Place, 
Brooklyn, are disturbed because of 
a plan to erect a theater at 292 Court 
St., which will extend through to 
Tompkins Place. The property 
owners have prepared a protest to 
be acted on Jan. 23. 



Four Units at Lasky Plant 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Four companies now 
at work at the Lasky studio are the 
William de Mille unit, producing. 
"Grumpy." "The Trail of the Lone- 
some Pine" unit, in which Mary Miles 
Minter stars, "Prodigal Daughters," 
starring Gloria Swanson, and "The 
Law of the Lawless," starring Dor- 
othy Dalton. 



(i (^h^AJycatocma-i. O-tcttouu^ 




The Vision 

(Continued from Page 1) 

which, through box office approval, indicate the type of enter- 
tainment desired. But often this is momentary; a whim to 
be appeased. Then some of these very pictures drop off in 
certain neighborhoods. For no apparent reason whatsoever. 
And no one seems to know why. 

Which leads to the query, pertinent and important — who has 
the vision? And why isn't it placed in operation? Because 
once this question is intelligently answered it might be simple 
to figure out a lot of the "whys" and "wherefores" that hit this 
business. Every once in awhile. 

BIG DEAL PENDING 

A little bird drops an idea. That there is a mighty big 
deal pending. And there should be some interesting develop- 
ments during the next few days. Meanwhile the lawyers are 
busy scratching out, and inserting in. Clauses. 

CLEM'S HIT 

Clem Deneker, Pneumonia, Nev. That's his monicker. 
And the celebrated exhibitor. Whose hard luck stories have 
created universal sympathy for him. Told his troubles to the 
AMPA. And "drew" the biggest house ever attending their 
famous and select Thursday luncheons. Clem was a real knock- 
out. He's visiting the local show palaces and his opinions of 
Broadway shows, and management, will, as usual, appear 
exclusively in THE FILM DAILY—* * * Advt. 

GEMS 

When Robert Bruce made his first series of "Wilderness 
Tales," among those who raved over them was yours truly. 
Saw the second series a few days ago. And boy, they are 
there. Probably "By Lantern Light" is the best all around for 
entertainment and artistic effects. But "Moonblind" runs close, 
and "Jenkins and the Mutt" has some fine shots and some 
wonderful tinting. These fit in every program. From Brooklyn 
to Buenos Aires. 

Go on, Bruce. Make some more. 

A RASPBERRY 

Says the Honorable Richard A. Rowland. Of First National. 
According to the New York World : 

"The popular girl of pictures will not be the pretty, doll faced type. 
She will be the ordinary appearing young woman who plays the lead- 
ing role in melodrama, because melodrama is going to be the principal 
screen fare, and in this form of picture facial beauty does not count for 
much. In almost every case out West the studios are getting ready for 
a series of these plays." 

When RA reaches Hollywood. Next time. What a recep- 
tion he will have from the doll faced lot? Whose numbers are 
mvriads. And whose baby doll expressions. Have put many 
houses in the "red." 

IMPORTANT— PROBABLY TRUE 

Sub franchise holders of First National may be happy from 
now on. Just maybe. For 'tis said that Katherine MacDonald's 
contract will not be renewed. And the lady of ice plans 
retirement from the screen. For marriage. Yes, boys, 1923 does 
look better. 

SALESMANSHIP 

This yarn comes from out Denver way. Where Harry 
Nolan holds forth. And just a few miles from Clem Deneker's 
abode of pleasure : 

Jack Lannon, old time liquor dispenser, up in Butte. Saw- 
dust, back room, piano player, girls and everything. Regular 
place. The boys came from miles around. All the wise crack- 
ers. Everybody happy. Mr. Volstead popped up ; stopped all 
the mirth and gayety. Too bad. Jack had a lot of kale. Some- 
body promoted him into bank robbing. Sold him an independent 
exchange. Explained how soft it was, etc. After awhile Jack 
discovered "Not so good." The customers didn't crave his 
product, Assortment bad, but had one good one. Says Jack: 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Fox will release "The Net" on F 
25, and "Does it Pay?" March 4. 



SIMPLEX TITLE SHOP 

220 W. 42nd St. 
Announces the closing of a contracl 
giving it exclusive sales rights on th( 

FAMOUS STONE LIBRARY 
Over two million feet of selected shots 
as far back as 1897, negative and posi- 
tive, are now made available for your 
requirements. 

Phone Bryant 0984-0985 



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LATE TO MEND" 

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CHARLES WALTON 

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INTER^CMI 



THE 



ay, January 22, 1923 




3 



On Broadway 

-"The Third Alarm." 

ray _ "All the World's a 

yn Strand — "When Knight- 
in Flower." 
—"Milady." 

—"Peg O' My Heart." 
>n — "Salome." 

New York— Today— "Back 
e and Broke." 

day— "Pawn Ticket No. 210" 
i "The Scarlet Car." 
nesday — "That Woman." 
s( j ay — "The Beautiful and 
mned." 

lv — "Women Men Marry" and 
he Great Night." 
-Jay — "Broken Chains." 
-"Hunting Big Game in 
a." 

-"Dark Secrets." 
-"When Knighthood Was in 

■er." 

—"Omar the Tentmaker." 



Next Week 
-"The Third Alarm." 

ray — "The Stranger's Ban- 
» 

jrn Strand — "When Knight- 
in Flower." 

—"One Billion in Jewels." 
[ — "Robin Hood." 
Ml — "Salome." 

-"Hunting Big Game in 
:a." 

-"Nobody's Money." 
-"World's Applause." 
—"The Voice From the Min- 



"The Christian" in B'way Strand 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Detroit — "The Christian" has been 
booked for the Broadway Strand 
commencing March 4. 



New House in the Bronx 

Samuel Minskoff plans a theater to 
seat 2,000 at Sheridan Ave. and 170th 
St. He is building one at 180th St. 
and Boston Road. Last year he built 
a house at Kingsbridge Rd. and 
Jerome Ave. 



Bendell Joins F. B. O. 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Albany, N. Y. — Victor Bendell who 
has been associated with the Goldwyn 
Film Corporation for the past six 
years, has been appointed general 
manager of the Film Booking Offices 
here. 



Women Nominated for Censor Board 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Milwaukee — Mayor D. W. Hoan 
has nominated Mrs. J. C. Buckland 
and Mrs. E. J. Kluckow for the censor 
board. A third nominee is Henry 
Staab. 



Free Shows in Okla. City 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Oklahoma City — All theaters were 
thrown open to all comers gratis on 
Jan. 9, the visitors being the guests 
cf Honorable J. C. ("Jack") Walton, 
in honor of his inauguration as Gov- 
ernor of Oklahoma. It is estimated 
that about 100,000 people visited the 
theaters. 



Dunkirk Theater Burned 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Dunkirk, N. Y.— Fire recently de- 
stroyed the Dronen and several prints 
of film here. 



Rehfeld to Manage Ingram Unit 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles— Curt Rehfeld, for 
some time assistant manager to Rex 
Ingram, will manage the unit when 
Ingram returns to film "Scara- 
mouche." 



Governor Wants State Tax 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Des Moines — Gov. Kendall in his 
inaugural address said he intends pro- 
posing a state amusement tax as a 
new source of state revenue, some- 
thing similar to the Federal admission 
tax. 



K. C. Women's Club Boycott 
Arbuckle 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Kansas City — The Athenaeum, a 
local women's organization composed 
of over 800 members has decided not 
to attend any shows where Arbuckle 
films are exhibited. 



Inflammable Film Banned 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Milwaukee — A peremptory order 
demanding the removal of inflam- 
mable film from all local department 
stores, has just been issued by W. D. 
Harper, city building inspector, who 
charges that on a single counter he 
found enough film to destroy the 
whole building. 



Ruling May Affect Film Unions 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Boston — The Supreme Court has 
decided that a company may legally 
require its employees to forsake mem- 
bership in labor unions. The ruling 
may affect the picture business so 
ar as operators and theater employees 
are concerned. The decision was a 
result of an action brought by the 
Moore Drop Forge Co. against the 
Springfield Central Labor Union. 



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HOME." 

Amalgamated Exchanges 
of America, Inc. 



Have Your Titles 

Made the Right Way 
Quality — Quantity 
24 hour Service 

FARINA & OGLE 

Title Photographers 

At Claremont Laboritories 

430 Claremont Parkway 

Tel. Bingham 2100 



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Out of a 
Clear Shy- 




THE 



c^&£fLs£ 






DAILY 



Monday, January 22, 19; 



The Vision 



(Continued from Pace §) 

"I'll go on the road myself." First town, Paratello. Saw Dan 
Carruthers. Says Dan: "Sorry, Mr. Lannon, but I can't use 
that kind of stuff in my house." "Mebbe not," says Jack, "but 
I got one that's a bear. Knocks them off the seats. Look at 
this herald." Don never heard of the film and the herald didn't 
mean anything. Don asks: "What's this picture all about?" 
Jack says : "It's about a 'Broad' and a 'Guy' and 'an Island.' " 

FIGURES AND SUCH 

Have you heard. How Roxy figures out. What the next 
week's gross at the Capitol will be? Well every week. He 
forwards the Goldwyn office. An estimate — of what the big 
house will gross — the succeeding week. How he does it — is a 
mystery. But the fact remains. That he is seldom — out of the 
way. In his estimates. 

KALE 

Frederick James Smith, in Photoplay, commenting on what 
some stars do with their money says; 

"Lillian Gish owns a tiny restaurant in San Pedro, Cal. 

"Norma Talmadge owns half of 'The Music Box Revue.' 

"Mary Miles Minter owns a laundry. 

"William Russell owns a beauty parlor." 

Most interesting of all are the possessions of David Wark 
Griffith, the producer of the pictures which have made more 
money than any others. The master director owns a fourteen- 
acre lemon ranch, a velour hat, three suits of clothes, and a watch. 

REWARD EARNED 

They do say. Down in the Wall Street territory of the 
business. That when Pathe directors meet next month. That 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Coast Brevities 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Hollywood — John F. Seitz, camera- 
man and Tom Storey, laboratory 
man, of the Rex Ingram staff, have 
arrived here from the East. 



Hugo Ballin has completed the ac- 
tual camera work on "Vanity Fair." 



Grant Carpenter has been signed 
for the Warner scenario staff. 



Nikolai de Ruitz has been added 
to the cast of the "The Hunchback 
of Notre Dame." 



The title of the latest Bull Montana 
comedy has been changed to "The 
Two Twins." 



Sam Rork and James Young have 
taken space at United for production 
of "Wandering Daughters." 



Herschel Mayall has been added to 
the cast of "The Isle of Dead Ships" 
which Maurice Tourneur is now mak- 
ing for First National. 



Jack Mulhall, Lew Cody, Eileen 
Percy, Joseph Kilgour, Helen Fergu- 
son, Tom Ricketts, Warde Crane and 
De Witt Jennings will support Norma 
Talmadge in "Within the Law." 

H. E. GAUSMAN. 



Seeking Site For Selznick 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — It is reported t| 
George L. Eastman, of the Cham; 
of Commerce, has appointed a cc| 
mittee from his office to assist 
Selznick representatives in finding 
suitable site for the new Selzr; 
offices. 



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LITTLE ADS WITH BIG THOUGHT 



The only place of its kind in 
the World 

3LL0YDS FILM STORAGE 



JOS. R. MILES 

Film Storage Vaults 
putting Rooms 
Projection Theatres 

Packing for domestic and ex- 
port shipment 
Film Library 
Editing and Titling 

Custom Clearances and For- 
warding 

130 W. 46th St. Bryant 5600 



Know Your Business 

Not knowing it has resulted in many 

failures. Let us guide you in 

your problems. 

W. A. FLEMING & CO. 

Public Accountants and Business 
Advisors 

452 Fifth Ave. Tel. Longacre 9074 



IN A FEW WORDS— 

Editing and titling that will 
win the case for your picture 
before OLD JUDGE PUBLIC 

LESLEY MASON 
729 7th Ave. Bryant 8174 



Wm b LAUB 

Film Continuity— Subtitles 
Editing Only the Highest Type 

of Independent Productions 
130 West 46th St. Bryant 9900 




Positive raw film 
manufactured in 
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Sole Agents 
COMMERCIAL FIBRE CO OF AMERICA, INC- 

Phone: Madison Square 4430 
15 East 26th St. New York City 



ENLARGEMENTS 
of 

Motion Picture Film Clips 

For All Purposes 

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ART 
TITLES 

LOUIS MEYER 

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251 West 19th Street 
Watkins 7620-7461 



TELL A GOOD STORY! 

That's half the selling 
problem. Come to a spe- 
cialist in motion picture 
publicity. 

FRED E. BAER 

Advertising 

Loew Bldg., 1540 Broadway 



Watch this page every Monday. Exhibitors 
can find here the little things that help to build 
patronage. Producers the little things that 
go to make big pictures and Distributors 
the little big ideas that make for success. 



LETTERIMC 
LAYOUTS 

ILLUSTRATIONS 



AND 



CARTOONS 

Bill Pause 

7IW.44TH.ST 

Ph Vanderbilt 4551 




THE 



day, January 22, 1923 




St. Louis Notes 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
, Louis — The F. B. O. Exchange 
moved into its new quarters at 
Olive St. 



le Walsh Motor Co. has adopted 
ires as a means of selling ma- 

;s. 



icar Canthor has been transferred 
tlanta, to handle Paramount pub- 
• in several Southern states. 



:ed & Yenn have opened their 
Capitol at Benton, 111., on the 
of the old Hippodrome. 



Roland Title Changed 

Pathe announces that the title of 
the next Ruth Roland serial has been 
changed from "The Riddle Rider of 
the Range" to "Haunted Valley." 



Plans For Nat'l Convention 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Chicago — The state theater owners 
have begun plans for the national 
convention and exposition to be held 
at the Coliseum, probably in May. 



le Film Board of Trade has re- 
;d its headquarters from the Em- 
> Theater Bldg. to offices above 
lew F. B. O. exchange. 



jdkinson has two new salesmen 
[aurice Aaron, who is travelling 
hern Illinois and Walter Light 
has been assigned to the Indiana 
:ory. 



inagers have broadcasted warn- 
against an individual who claims 
e J. Palethorpe. This worthy 
d St. Louis about two weeks ago 
called upon several exchange 
In each instance he held him- 
mt to be the personal representa- 
Df the president of the organiza- 
and it is alleged he took advan- 
to obtain cash for checks that 
returned from a New York bank 
:ed "No such account at this 



La Voise Joins Theater 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Pittsburgh — Roy La Voise, former 
Goldwyn exploiteer in Washington 
has been appointed manager of the 
Cameraphone theater. 



From the Maritime 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Toronto — The Famous Players 
Canadian Corp. has taken over the 
Province in Winnipeg. 



Vitagraph has no intention of re- 
linquishing its exchange despite re- 
ports to that effect. 



The Capitol will be built starting 
in April. It will have straight picture 
policy and will be one of the Spencer 

circuit. 



Capreol Theater Burns 

Toronto — A fire that swept the 
business section of Capreol in North- 
ern Ontario, wiped out the one pic- 
ture theater Rossman's, the loss being 
$20 000. 



Gets Two More 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Chicago — C. E. Beck has taken 
over the Rose and Alcazar on Madi- 
son St. from Jones, Linick & 



Schaeffer. This gives 
houses in the loop. 



Beck three 



Buffalo Strand Closing 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Buffalo — The Mark-Strand Thea- 
ter will close Feb. 1. There is much 
discussion here as to what the Strand 
interests will do to keep their name 
in Buffalo. 



"Saturday Night" a weekly news- 
paper of standing in Canada, has at- 
tacked the stock selling proposals of 
Ernest Shipman. According to this 
paper, it is practically throwing 
money away to invest in these stock 
selling film producing companies, 
formed in Canada. 



$1,189,300 Spent in Construction 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Ottawa — According to an official 
review of construction for 1922, 38 
theaters were built or rebuilt, the total 
cost being $1,189,300. This does not 
cover decorating, furnishing or equip- 
ping any of the structures. 



"The Wheel" Trade Showed 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Paris— Abel Gance's, "The Wheel," 
was recently given several trade 
showings in this city. The produc- 
tion took over three years to pro- 
duce and cost approximately 4,000,000 
francs. Pathe Consortium Cinema 
are handling the film. 



'THE FIRE PATROL." 

Amalgamated Exchanges 
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Frothingham's Plans 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — J. L. Frothingham's 
next production will be "The Dice 
Girl," an original by Harvey Gates, 
after which he will make a picture 
from a celebrated stage play, the 
name to be announced later. 



Mr. Exhibitor: 
Ask Your Film Company for the 

"THEMATIC MUSIC CUE SHEEF 



(Pat. Applied For) 

It means more to you than any 
other accessory. It is the cue sheet 
{that insures a musically perfect 
picture presentation* 



"LIFE OF AN 
ACTRESS." 

Amalgamated Exchanges 
of America, Inc. 



WILLIAM deMILLE'S 



it 



Grumpy 



99 



with THEODORE ROBERTS, MAY McAVOY and 

CONRAD NAGEL 



From the play by Horace Hodges and T. Wigney Percy val 

Released April 8th 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



THE play that broke London's record, 
ran a year in New York, and then came 
back for a season-long return engagement. 
Few stories have been written with such 
heart-appeal, such appealing characteriza- 
tions, such dramatic suspense. 

The role is ideal for Roberts. As Eng- 

"Dark Secrets." 
"My American Wife." 
"Drums of Fate." 
"Nobody's Money." 
"Adam's Rib." 
"Java Head." 
"The White Flower." 




FAMOUS P1AYERS-L71SKY CORPORATION 

AOOLPM ZUKOB Ow.d..t , 



land's greatest criminal lawyer, who con- 
ceals a heart of gold under a grouchy man- 
ner, he gives a performance long to be 
remembered. The cast is unusually strong, 
including, besides the featured players, 
Casson Ferguson, Bertram Johns, Fred 
Huntley and Charles Ogle. This is William 
deMille's biggest box-office attraction. 

"Adam and Eva." 

"Racing Hearts" 

"The Nth Commandment" 

"Mr. Billing* Spend* His Diaae" 

"The Glimpses of the Moon." 
"The Leopardess." 
"Bella Donna." 




Screen play by Clara Beranger 




No. 


9 


No. 


10 


No. 


11 


No. 


12 


No. 


13 


No. 


14 


No. 


15 



CC (paramount (picture 



WATCH THIS 

SPACE 

TOMORROW 

FOR 

No. 17 



In the Courts 

The suit of Benjamin P. Schulberg 
against United Artists, D. W. Griffith, 
Douglas and Mary Pickford Fair- 
banks and Charles Chaplin, has been 
discontinued by Supreme Court Jus- 
tice Gavegan at the request of 
O'Brien, Malevinsky & Driscoll for 
the defendant, because it has been 
settled. 

Perl S. Parish got an attachment 
in the Supreme Court against the 
property of the Sterling Pictures 
Corp., in a suit for services, in which 
she claims $2 000. The attachment 
was served on the property of the 
defendant, but an order has been filed 
discharging the attachment because 
the defendant put up a bond of $2,250. 




DAILY 



Monday, January 22, 



: 



The Appellate Division of the Su- 
preme Court has upheld a ruling of 
the lower court that a balance of 
$336 in the Equitable Trust Co., to 
the credit of Mme. Valentine Perret. 
wife of Leonce Perret, must be ap- 
plied on the payment of a judgment 
obtained against Mme. Perret by 
Rita Vinay. The papers show that 
this sum is the balance of $18,000 
paid to Mme. Perret as agent for her 
husband by Pathe for the film, 
"Twisted Man," most of which fund 
she converted into frances and took 
to France with her. She alleged that 
the money belongs to her husband al- 
though it stands in her name. 



King Completes Feature 
Burton King has finished direction 
of "Better Times Ahead" at the Ideal 
studio. 



The Vision 



(Continued from Page 4) 

it wouldn't be surprising if Elmer Pearson was made "Mister 
President." Which would mean a well earned reward. To a 
man who puts day and night work. In on a schedule. And who 
works in his shirt sleeves. And gets results. 

THEY ALWAYS COME BACK 

Anthony Paul Kelly. Regular writer. Sour and sore. Some 
time ago. Said he would never write another scenario for pic- 
tures. After Which Cecil DeMille; Jaydee Williams; David 
Griffith and a few other master minds. Decided to worry along. 
But for a time they considered suicide. As the only way out. 
After Tony's explosion. 

And then. After they changed their minds. With the com- 
ing of the dawn. As the title writers put it. Tony proved him- 
self a regular he-man. And changed his mind. And so he's 
gone to Pittsburgh for atmosphere. For the steel making pic- 
ture, "White Heat." For Famous. 

RENTALS 

F. H. Smith. An old timer. Down in Thomasville, Georgia. 
Is thru. Says high rentals, excessive taxation, and lack of patron- 
age caused him to close. This industry might not be able to 
stop the taxation stuff. But the other reasons could be reme- 
died. And they should be. This isn't the time to lose one real 
worker. And down South they say Smith is a real man. And 
on the level. That's reason enough to keep him in business. 

GHOSTS 

The Scientific American recently offered $5,000 for a pho- 
tograph of a ghost. To which Jim Bray. Of the Bray Come- 
dies. Sent a letter offering not one photo. But a whole reel 
of them. For the five grand. 

It may only be incidental. But Bray is producing the Heeza 
Liar Comedies. At the moment. DANNY. 



"Suzanna" Road Showed 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) j 

Los Angeles — Mack Senni 5 
"Suzanna" is being translated 
Spanish editions and will be ret- 
soon for a road show tour thro i 
the Latin countries. The first L;|i 
presentation will be in Buenos Ai 



Increase Capital 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Chicago — The Illington Amus. l] 
operating the Illington has increai 
the capital stock from $10,000 to $ • 
000. 

The Marsfield Amus. Co., of 
city have increased the capital st] 
from $25,000 to $100,000. 



G. A. Zaft, A. N. Felton and 
Felton have formed the Kedzie M< 
rose Amus. Co., with offices at 4 
No. Kedzie Ave. 



"SUNSHINE OF PARA 
DISE ALLEY." 

Amalgamated Exchanges 
of America, Inc. 



"THE WOMAN IN 
CHAINS." 

Amalgamated Exchanges 
of America, Inc. 



ft 

« 

ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
i.i 
ft 
ft 
v 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
i.t 

ft 
ft 

ft 

a picturization of the famous novel and stage play by 

ft 
ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 
ft 
« 
:.: 
ft 
ft 



SPECIAL TRADE SHOWING 

THE CHRISTIAN 



:.: 
:t 
:.: 
ft 

i.t 
ft 



i.t 
if 
ft 
ft 



Presentation under 
the personal direc- 
tion of 

S. L. Rothafel 



Sir Hall Caine 

directed by 

Maurice Tourneur 



NOTE: This is 

the most important 
showing for exhibit- 
ors of the year. 



CAPITOL THEATRE 



Tuesday Morning 

January 23d — 10:15 sharp. 



£#*♦.*♦.♦ ♦.♦ ♦>♦>♦>♦>♦>♦.•♦>♦.♦ *.♦ ♦> 



fe BRADSTREET 
/ FILMDOM 






'CKIIsi 



Authority 




XXIII No. 22 



Tuesday, January 23, 1923 



Price 5 Cent* 



Sign Cohan? 

ted Principal Pictures Have 
il Under Way and That Pro- 
iucer Will Collaborate at 

Studio 
as reported that Principal Pic- 
have secured a number of the 
e M. Cohan plays and the pro- 
upon his return from England 
d of this week will leave for 
t ngeles to collaborate on pro- 
i. 

This is London," "Mary" and 
: Nelly Kelly" were the plays 
ely reported as being involved 

transaction. Principal is the 
lolding company in which all 
Lesser enterprises are merged. 
>mpany has already secured one 
i Cohan plays, "The Meanest 
in the World," which will be 

in production shortly, 
ng M. Lesser, vice-president of 
pal, could not be reached yes- 

for a statement, and at the 

offices, the report was "news 
m." 



•ner Bros, have two Cohan 
on next year's schedule, "Lit- 
ahnny Jones" and "George 
ngton, Ja." 



jeing New York 

By Clem Deneker 
ling Director, Deneker Circuit 
of Theaters and Depots 
1, New York is all right. I 
lere two days now and I don't 
uch difference between this and 
n City, except more people 
lore lights, but I sure was dis- 
lted in the theaters. I went to 
rand the first night I was here, 
/hile they had quite a line up 
iple out in front, something was 
ig. It seemed like lots of people 
lassing the door without going 
)w, that's one thing that 
In't happen. I met Joseph 
:ett, the manager, and ast him 
he didn't put a "speiler" out in 
to remind people the show was 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Pardon—Our Error 

lm Daily: 

May I correct an error. 
Clem Deneker did not dis- 
ss hard luck experiences with 
e — he listened. 

Sincerely yours, 

FRED DESBERG. 




"Secrets of Paris" stood 'em up all week during its engagement at the Vic- 
toria theater in Philadelphia. Robert Lynch cites it as positively the best 
independent he has bought. — Advt 



District Managers Here 
The Metro district managers are in 
town for a sales conference. 



Gray in Charge in Boston 

New England Theaters, Inc., has 
concluded arrangements whereby its 
Boston houses will be operated under 
direction of William P. Gray. No 
change of ownership is contemplated 
p.nd the present officials will continue 
in office. For some months past 
Gray has operated its theater holdings 
in Maine and New Hampshire. 

The Manchester Amusement Co., 
a subsidiary has sold the Strand, 
Rockland, Mass., to L. A. Rhodenizer, 
the theater's former manager. 



Abe Warner Coastbound 
Abe Warner leaves for Los An- 
geles tomorrow. 



Some Figures 

Of the Famous-Lynch Deal — Lynch 

Large Stockholder in The 

Corporation 

Famous Players announce that 
contracts have been executed where- 
by S. A. Lynch of Atlanta and his 
associates had been relieved of the 
management of the theaters and film 
exchanges operated throughout the 
South by Southern Enterprises. Inc. 

At the same time Famous Players 

paid to S. A. Lynch Enterprises 

Finance Corp.. approximately $1,900,- 

000 which appeared on the company's 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Jersey City Loses 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Jersey City. N. J. — A temporary in- 
junction issued Saturday in Jersey 
City against Director of Public Safety 
William B. Quinn and Police Capts. 
James Larkins, Edward O'Connor 
and William Hogue, enjoining them 
from interfering with operation of six 
theaters on Sunday was dismissed 
yesterday by Vice-Chancellor John 
Bentley. The injunction was secured 
by the State Theaters Corp., the Ritz 
Theaters Corp. and Louis Blumen- 
thal. 



Some Facts 

About Pictures Which Prove of In- 
terest to Legislators and Others — 

Pettijohn Uses It 
One of the best aids which Charlie 
Pettijohn is using throughout the 
country in states where legislative 
battles are on is a pamphlet which, 
together with other interesting ma- 
terial contains a chart on the last page 
with a number of interesting figures. 
Investment in the industry is placed 
at $1,250,000,000; taxable property 
at $720,000,000, approximate cost of 
(Continued on Page 3) 



Competition 

Several Important Distributors Are 

Reported Interested in Fitz- 

maurice — Goldwyn Not 

Talking 

Since the return here of Samuel 
Goldwyn from the Coast, where, as 
noted, he placed George Fitzmaurice 
under contract, it is understood that 
<een competition has developed for 
the release of the forthcoming Fitz- 
maurlce productions. Several of the 
larger companies are said to be inter- 
ested in securing- the Fitzmaurice pro- 
luctions which are expected to be in 
"erdiness for the Fall season. 

Samuel Goldwyn could not be 
located for a statement yesterday. 
Coast reports indicate that Fitz- 
maurice will leave for New York in 
April, upon the completion of "The 
Cheat." As previously noted, Pola 
Negri will be featured in this by 
Famous. 

Although no announcement has 
seen made it is generally expected 
in well advised film circles that who- 
ever distributes the Fitzmaurice pro- 
ductions will also handle the "Potash 
& Perlmutter" production which 
Goldwyn will also make. 



Harry Rapf Coming East 
Harry Rapf is expected to arrive 
here from the coast soon with a print 
of "Brass." 



Ince Signs Wray, Is Report 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — John Griffith Wray 
has left for New York to obtain feat- 
ure mattrial. It is reported he will 
make three specials for Ince. 



E. O. Blackburn To Coast 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Chicago — Edward O. Blackburn 

has left for the coast to resume 

charge of sales and service at the 

Rothacker plant. 



May Have Five Directors 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — According to the 
Times, B. P. Schulberg expects to 
have five units at work by March 1st. 
At present he has three, headed by 
Tom Forman, Louis Gasnier and 
Victor Schertzinger. 



The Film Year Book 

Will be delivered to paid 
subscribers probably the end 
of the week, or early in the 
coming week. 



—. £Efr* 



DAILY 



Tuesday, January 23, 192 

" ■■■■ — ■ 




D^jll^BBaBBan 



VoL XXIII Ho. 22 Tuesday, Jan. 23,1923 Price 5 Cents 

Copyright 1923, Wid's Film and Film Folks. 
Inc., Publiahed Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joaeph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 
J. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Katcred as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Tsrms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
at Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, 4S.O0; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$13.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St,, New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: VanderbBt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 HoUywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 
Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Cliehy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau, Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
vakia), Wenzelaplatz. 



Quotations 



High Low Close Sales 

East. Kod. 96J4 96^4 96*4 500 
F. P.-L. . . 84H 83% 84 H 2,000 
do pfd Not quoted 



G'wyn ... SJ4 5*4 5% 100 finished a ten week run at Miller s. 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's .. 19J4 19 19 1,500 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 



Incorporations 

Albany — Miracle Theater Corp., 
Bronx. Capital $10,000. Incorpor- 
ators, A. James and D. Goldstein. 



Albany — Aress Amuse. Co., Man- 
hattan. Capital $50,000. Incorpor- 
ators, H. Suchman, J. and I. Rosen- 
thal. 



Spokane, Wash. — Blue Mouse 
Theater, Tacoma. Capital, $60,000. 
Incorporators, John Hamrick, L. O. 
Lukan and C. E. Gates. 



Some Figures 

(Continued from Page 1) 
balance sheet as a liability. Of this 
sum $1,500,000 was paid by Famous 
Players to Lynch and his associates, 
with 15,000 shares of Famous Players 
common stock. The announcement 
emphasized the fact that Famous 
Players did not contemplate any re- 
financing, and that there was no 
truth in rumors recently circulated 
to that effect. 

The following officers of Southern 
Enterprises, Inc., have been elected: 
President, Frederic G. Lee; vice- 
president, Harold B. Franklin; sec- 
retary and treasurer, Frederick Metz- 
ler. Dan Michalove, director of thea- 
ters, will be in active charge under 
the supervision of Harold B. Frank- 
lin. A. S. Barnard is retained as 
general counsel. 



With Lynch holding 15,000 shares 
of Famous stock this undoubtedly 
makes him one of the largest stock- 
holders of the corporation. Inci- 
dentally the stock is appraised at $100 
a share. It is now selling at about 
84^. 



"Tess" Ends Long Run 

^.'.(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
/Xos Angeles — Mary Pickford's, 
^Tess of the Storm Country" has just 



Shauer Goes to Havana 

E. E. Shauer, left on Sunday for 
Havana, in company with Chester E. 
Sawyer, vice-president of the Carib- 
bean Film Co. to discuss distribution 
in Cuba and Central America. 



Arrange Distribution 

The Carlton King Prod, have turn- 
ed over to Producers Security the 
handling of their pictures throughout 
the world. 



Albany — Fascination Pictures, Inc., 
Manhattan. Capital $10,000. Incor- 
porators, L. R. Bangsberg, H. S. 
Douglas and E. C. Christensen. 



Albany — F. X. Pictures, Inc., 
Yonkers. Capital, $20,000. Incor- 
porators, I. Kaplan, P. Cohen and S. 
Ellis. 



Albany — Verity Film Co., Inc., 
Manhattan. Capital $50,000. Incor- 
porators, Joseph Anna and P. 
Ornato. 



Jefferson City, Mo. — Progress Pic- 
tures, Inc., St. Louis — Capital, $20,- 
000. Incorporators, A. Goldman, T. 
Leonard and J. Olsen. 



;i (£>cLiu:<xtic?nasl 'LcttMuu^* 




Cannot Show Films 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Oklahoma City — A restraining 
order was issued by the District 
Court, restraining Jacob H. Cooper, 
manager of the Criterion, from show- 
ing unauthorized Governor J. C. 
Walton inaugural films, and the In- 
ternational, Universal, Selznick and 
Pathe from showing the films any- 
where in the United States. 

The restraining order was based 
on petition of Dan V. Lackey, who 
had the only official barbecue pictures, 
made under his personal supervision, 
and at a cost approximately $5,000. 
Lackey claims that the pictures be- 
longs to the barbecue committee, 
and if any proceeds are realized from 
exhibition of the pictures, that they 
will go to the committee. 

Final termination of the matter 
will be thrashed out in the courts in 
the near future. 



Seeing New York 

(Continued from Page 1) 

"now going on," but he just stood 
and looked at me, and I could see 
he was at a loss for an answer. I 
wanted to tell him that the people 
who is running that life of a fireman 
at the Astor Theater, two crossroads 
down Broadway, has a "spieler" out 
in front — but then I didn't want to 
give those other peoples ideas away 
to an opposition manager. 

I don't think the decorations of 
the Strand is in keeping with the 
show, and am wondering if Mr. 
Plunkett changes them every week. 
If he does I got a couple a clever 
ideas that I used at Leprosy when 
I played "The Draper's Sister," 
which he is welcome to without 
charge from me. 

The feature at the Strand was 
pretty good though, but I thought 
maybe they was making a mistake 
having the music play while the pic- 
ture is on so that you can't hear 
people next to you reading the titles 
out loud. This wouldn't do at 
Pneumonia, where I got a lot of In- 
dian customers who can't read and 
who depends on others to read the 
titles. 

The music was nice, especially the 
melodium. 

Of course the Strand is got a dif- 
ferent kind of clientele than what I 
got, they evidently don't ever get the 
same people twice, while I got to 
get the same people back every night, 
so that I got to run a better show 
that he does, considering everything. 

Mr. Rothapfel is going to take me 
to the Capitol next time I can get 
away from that V. L. S. E. crowd 
that is showing me the town. I'll 
bring Mrs. Deneker here the next 
time. She can meets these exhibitor's 
wives and give them some great ideas 
on fashion shows with their pictures 
which we originated at Pneumonia. 

I want to thank the producers for 
the nice time I had at the convention 
last Thursday for lunch. 

I was a little disappointed in the 
looks of some of the boys at the 
meeting, but guess they mean well. 



Franklin En Route West 

Harold B. Franklin, of Famous 
Players, left on Saturday on a two 
weeks' trips to Los Angeles. 



Rogers Handling "Success 
Charles R. Rogers, president of 
Resolute Film Sales, Inc., is in charge 
of distribution on Murray W. Gars- 
son's "Success," which was directed 
by Ralph Ince. The cast includes 
Brandon Tynan, Naomi Childers, 
Mary Astor, Dore Davidson, Lionel 
Adams, Billy Quirk and others. 
Distribution will probably be an- 
nounced within a few days. 



We Are Ready to Pay CASH 

FOR PRODUCTIONS OF AAER IT 
for NEW YORK CM and STATE a NORTHERN NEW dERSEy 

The Bigger They Come --The Better We Like Them. 
RENOWN PICTURES, inc. 

72.9- SEVENTH AVE. Phone BRYANT A7BA-- 6\7A- 



"The Ne'er-Do-Well" Compai 
will not return to New York fro 
Panama before Feb. 1. 



KLUTHO STUDIO IN FLORIDA 
FOR SALE 

Cooper-Hewitts hard lights and 
laboratory located on valuable 
ground in heart of city. Cost 
$65,000. Will sell at a sacrifice. 
Reasonable amount in cash bal- 
ance on time. 
Will be'dismantled in 30 days if not told 

H. J. Klutho, Owner 
Room 401 St. James Building 

Jacksonville, Florida. 
No coal needed, no snow and ice. 
Cheapest electric juice in the 
Country only 2 cents a kilowatt. 



title: 



NEGATIVE 
POSITIVE 
Incl. CARDS 

15 CENTS PER FOOT 

24 Hour Service if necesso 

SIMPLEX TITLE SHOI 

220 W. 42d Street Bryant OS 



Now at 203-5 W. 40th St. 

In our OWN LABORATORY 

and STUDIO 

ERNEST STERN 

The Titleman, 
Phones- Penn. 2373-2374 



^Jjtmmrc (EWpnrcxtum 

RESOURCES - $5,000,000 

Knickerbocker Building 
Broadway >t 42nd Street, N. T. City 



Phone — Beekman 9091 




RBAfc 

119 Fulton St., 

INSURANCE EXPERTS 
TO THE THEATRICAL ANI 
MOTION PICTURE INDUSTE 



w 



SIMPLEX TITLE SHOP 

220 W. 42nd St. 
Announces the closing of a contract 
giving it exclusive sales rights on the 

FAMOUS STONE LIBRARY 
Over two million feet of selected shots 
as far back as 1897, negative and posi- 
tive, are now made available for your 
requirements. 

Phone Bryant 0984-0985 



THE 



uesday, January 23, 1923 







Houses Must Stay Closed 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Richmond, Ind. — Although some of 
e "blue laws" have been modified 
re, the Sunday closing ordinance 
11 not be lifted. 



Schwartz Sells his Three 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Milwaukee — Joe Schwartz has sold 
3 three houses, the Liberty, Kos- 
>usko and Riviera. 



To Film Finish of Iowa 

Navy photographers will film the 
ish of the old Iowa, an obsolete 
irship which will be sunk March 
in the Bay of Panama. 



Oppose Leasing to "Outsiders" 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Denver— The M. P. T. O. of Col- 
ido, at a recent meeting, voiced 
;ir opposition to the practice of 
Dducing and distributing organiza- 
ns leasing films, other than educa- 
nals, to any but regular licensed 
;aters engaged in the business of 
hibiting pictures. 



Protest St. Paul House 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
St. Paul — Residents in the vicinity 

Carter and Doswell Avenues, 
iced their opposition against the 
ection of a $65,000 house, at a hear- 
» given before the city council, 
scar Tatkin and Morris Goldberg 
e behind the project. They intend 
lilding several houses in the resi- 
ntial district of the city. 



Proposed Ordinance Killed 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Minneapolis — Through the state 
exhibitor body, the proposed ordin- 
ance presented to the city council 
asking for the maintenance of a fire- 
man in every house with a seating 
capacity of 300 or more, has been 
killed. 



Some Facts 

(Continued from Page 1) 
annual production at $200,000,000 and 
combined weekly circulation of news 
reels at 40,000,000. All the data has 
been collected and compiled by the 
Hays organization in the following 
chart: 

Motion picture theaters in the United States 15,000 

Seating calpacity (one show) 7,605.000 

Average weekly attendance at picture theaters 50,000.000 

Admissions paid annually $520,000,000 

The average number of reels used for one performance 8 

Average number of seats in picture theaters 507 

Number of persons employed in picture theaters 105,000 

Persons permanently employed in picture production 50,000 

Permanent employees in all branches of picture industry 300,000 

Investment in motion picture industry $1,250,000,000 

Approximate cost of pictures produced annually $200,000,000 

Salaries and wages paid annually at studios in production $75,000,000 

Cost of costumes, scenery, and other materials and supplies used in pro- 
duction annually $50,000,000 

Average cost of one feature film production $150,000 

Average number of ieature films produced annually 700 

Average number of short reel subjects, excluding news reels, annually.... 1,500 

Taxable motion picture property in the United States $720,000,000 

Percentage of pictures made in California (1922) ,x4< ( 

Percentage of pictures made in New York ( 1922) \2 , 

Percentage of pictures made elsewhere in United States (1922) 4', 

Foreign made pictures sent here for sale (1922) 425 

Foreign made pictures sold and released for exhibition 

Theaters running six to seven days per week 9 000 

Theaters running four to five days per week 1,500 

Theaters running one to three days per week 4 500 

Lineal feet of film exported in 1921 14Q qoo 000 

Lineal feet of film exported in 1913 32.000 000 

Percentage of American films used in foreign countries 90 

Film footage used each week by news reels 1.400 000 

Combined circulation of news reels weekly 40.000,000 

Number of theaters using news reels weekly 11,000 

Amount spent annually by producers and exhibitors in newspaper and 

magazine advertising $5,000,000 

Amount Spent annually by producers in photos, cuts, slides, and other 

accessories $2,000,000 

Amount spent annually by producers in lithographs $2,000,000 

Amount spent annually by producers in printing and engraving $3,000,000 



Southwestern Notes 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Moran, Tex.— J. Goodfriend has 
opened his new theater. 



Pecos, Tex.— The Rialto will install 
a radio equipment soon. 



Waco, Tex.— D. W. Ray has pur- 
chased the Auditorium. 



Bryan, Tex.— Mrs. Marshall and 
Miss Wilson have opened the Palace. 



Dallas— Joseph C. Singer has leased 
the Queen now operated by Southern 
Enterprises. 



Haskell, Tex.— The Haskell recent- 
y leased by Ed Robertson, has been 
jurchased by him. 



Waco, Tex.— Dr. K. H. Aynes- 
worth has purchased the Victory from 
■outhern Enterprises, Inc. 



Petrolia, Tex. — A fire originating in 
he booth of the Petrolia did consider- 
able damage. 



San Antonio, Tex.— The Palace is 
.he name given by Louis Santikos to 
the new house which will be opened 
about Feb. 1. 



L. J. Pruch Joins Home 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Omaha — Louis J. Pruch has joined 
the ranks of Home's Exploitation 
Service. 



ComindAs a 
Gift of Providence 




THE 



Lj-i-- ■.■■*«■ r-ja' 'aHML-tw.. .1 *±*<m 



•tiBZHk 



DAILY 



Tuesday, January 23, 1923 



St. Louis Notes 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
St. Louis- — F. S. Russell has been 
named manager of the Yale Theater, 
Anna, 111., recently taken over by the 
lllmo Amusement Co. The house 
was formerly the Main but the name 
was changed to conform to that of 
other houses owned by the company 
in Shelbyville, 111., and Macon, Mo. 



A loan of $300,000 on the Columbia 
theater building and site has been 
made by the Edward K. Love Real 
Estate Co. to Frank R. Tate, Charley 
Cella and other owners. It is under- 
stood that they plan to improve the 
site with a lofty structure to be de- 
voted to retail stores and offices. 



Jack Underwood of Enterprise has 
announced the early release in this 
territory of "The American Torre- 
ador" and "Other Men's Boots." 



Oklahoma Exhibitor Killed 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Perry, Okla. — A. T. Cook, owner 
of the Lyric, was killed in an auto- 
mobile accident near Orlando, Okla. 



EXPLOITATION and ADVER- 
TISING SPECIALIST 

1 — Can exploit, advertise, sell and manage 
any production. 

2 — Creator of Novelty Exploitation and pub- 
licity stunts. 

3 — "Empty Seat Doctor" for Exhibitors. 

4 — Sales-Promotion and Idea Man Seeks Con- 
nection. Will go anywhere. 
Address B-l, care The Film Daily 



CHROMOS TRADING^CO. 
1123 Broadway 



Suite 616 



'Phone CheJ»ea 8294 



Ready 

Money 

WHEN YOU 
NEED IT 

REPUTABLE 

PROPOSITIONS 

FINANCED. 

IN ANY 
AMOUNT. 

Specialized Service 
to Motion Picture 
Enterprises. 

Quick Action. 

Consult with us in 
Confidence. 



Putting It Ov*>r 



Here is how a brother ex- 
hibitor put his show over. 
Send along your ideas. Let 
the other fellow know how you 
cleaned up. 



Effective Publicity 

St. Louis — To exploit "Gimme" at 
the Delmonte, Manager Ernest Lynch 
filed in the Circuit Court a pro forma 
decree of incorporation for an Anti- 
Gimme Society of St. Louis. 

The papers declared that the or- 
ganization was opposed to tips for 
waiters; to calling taxicabs to take 
young ladies home, etc., etc., and the 
newspapers fell for the stunt with a 
vengeance, giving it much space. The 
otar even commented on the society 
editorially, and then the Delmonte 
sprang its advertising. 



Another Window Tie-up 

Columbus, O. — H. T. Snowden, 
Goldwyn exploiteer arranged a clever 
window display when "Broken 
Chains" played at the Grand here. He 
placed a pile of chains in a Main 
Street window and used a card read- 
ing "How many links in this chain? 
Twenty free tickets to the Grand 
Theater for the ten best answers each 
day. Leave your answers inside." 

On one side of the display he used 
a three sheet cutout and on the op- 
posite side an art card display setting 
forth the high spots of the picture. 
The entire window was banked with 
stills from the production. 



Co-Operative Advertising 

Flint, Mich. — That merchants will 
fall for a page of co-operative adver- 
tising, when it is of an interesting 
nature, is proved by the tie-up that 
was made when "Sherlock Holmes" 
played the Orpheum. John Wilstach, 
Goldwyn exploiteer went to The Jour- 
nal, and sold them on the idea of a 
page advertising with local merchants, 
all featuring the great detective, using 
the slogan across the top of the page 
— "Sherlock Holmes Discovers in 
Flint." 

The rest of the page told what 
Sherlock Holmes found out of a 
favorable nature, about certain firms 
in the city. Among these such ad- 
vertisers were approached, and came 
into the tie-up as the Studebaker 
Automobile Co., The Victor Phono- 
graph Co., and the Baker Business 
College. 



To Fight School Showings 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Cleveland— The Ohio M. P. T. O. 

have launched an attack against the 

showing of theatrical films in schools 

and churches. 



Engaged for "Main Street" 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Gus Inglis, general 
manager for P'lorence Vidor, states 
that Associated Exhibitors, Inc., to 
whom Miss Vidor is under contract, 
granted permission for her to play a 
leading role in "Main Street" for 
Warner Brothers. Miss Vidor has 
just completed "Alice Adams" and in 
addition to this has two other com- 
pleted vehicles for release by Asso- 
ciated. 



Reproductive quality enables the sensitive 
emulsion to correctly portray every step of 
gradation from highest light to deepest 
shadow. 

EASTMAN 
POSITIVE FILM 

faithfully reproduces every tone cf the 
negative. It carries the quality through 
to the screen. 



Eastman Film, both regular and tinted base — 
now available in nine colors, is identified through- 
out its leneh bv the words " Eastman" "Kodak" 
stenciled in black letters in the transparent margin. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Short Stuff 



Bread without butter. 

Clothes without buttons. 

Programs without short subjects. 

One is as foolish as the other. The "Short 
Stuff" number, out February 19, will contain 
innumerable suggestions of real value not 
only to the producer and distributor of this 
material, but live, wide awake showmen will 
find much of advantage in the various articles 
to be contained in this issue. 



An unusual "buy" for the producer and dis- 
tributor of short stuff. 



THE 



lay, January 23, 1923 



'£tl 



DAILY 



For Once 
All the Critics Agree! 

Read What They Say About 




VEN 



Presented by CARL LAEMMLE 
with a brilliant cast including Charles Mack (courtesy D. W. Griffith), Eleanor Fair, 
Burr Mcintosh, George Bancroft and Emily Fitzroy. 

The Supreme Epic of Kentucky Hills 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 

Intensely dramatic, well directed. Strong heart 
interest. Different from any other American 
made production. 

EXHIBITORS HERALD 

So powerfully portrayed as to make the film an 
epic of the Blue Ridge. It has every angle of 
appeal! 

EXHIBITORS TRADE REVIEW 

A powerful picture, makes strong demands upon 
the emotions. Sounds the depths and the heights. 
Digs under your skin and stays there. 

From the Prize Story in the Cosmopolitan 
Magazine by Jay Gelzer. 



FILM DAILY 

A mighty fine picture and a very powerful dra- 
matic entertainment. Should find a place among 
the year's best pictures. Don't miss "Driven"! 

MORNING TELEGRAPH 

A really splendid film. It is gratifying to be able 
to recommend this as one of the finest we have 
seen. 

SCREEN OPINIONS 

It is a wonderful picture — a gripping drama, 
powerful character study! 

MOTION PICTURE NEWS 

For gripping situations it has not often been 
surpassed. Its tensity is continuous! 



A Charles Brabin Production 



UNIVERSAL 

PICTURES CORPORATION 



THE 



■c&m 



DAILY 



Tuesday, January 23, 19, 



Newspaper Opinions 

"Peg O'My Heart"— Metro 
Capitol 

MORNING WORLD— Laurette Taylor's 
screen Peg is one of the most vivid and 
amusing light comedy performances we can 
remember, but the transfer of Mr. Manner's 
play from the stage to the cinema has not 
been so successful. The picture * * * will 
amaze Miss Taylor's admirers with its re- 
markably fine picturing of the actress her- 
self, and her aptness in stepping so natur- 
ally before the camera with Michael under 
her arm. * * * But somewhere in the making 
of the picture * * * King Vidor, or some 
one, did something, or failed to do something, 
which reduced the pretty stage play to un- 
even, just pretty fair picture stuff. It may 
not have been Mr. Vidor's fault at all. Pos- 
sibly the difficulty lay in expressing Peg's 
mission in Ireland by way of printed dialect 
subtitles. 

AMERICAN — As a picture, it is as en- 
joyable as it was as a play, due to Miss Tay- 
lor's vivacious interpretation. * ♦ * Miss 
Taylor, with Mary Pickfordian curls, has a 
delightful screen presence and breezes 
through her role with a great deal of pleas- 
ure and animation'. 

DAILY NEWS—* * * Miss Laurette Tay- 
lor crashes into the movies and pins her 
star to a tall cloud. We hope that she goes 
on making pictures, because the cinema needs 
actresses. » * * Vidor's direction on the 
whole is pleasing, although here and there it 
smacks of a little screen hokum. But then, 
the play itself is hardly literature and per- 
haps Mr. Vidor was getting everything he 
could out of it. 

MORNING TELEGRAPH— Laurette Tay- 
lor and "Peg o' My Heart," on view at the 
Capitol this week, are a combination which 
should prove mightily potent in any motion 
picture house lucky enough to secure them. 
To begin with, it may be asserted that the 
screen lost a great star when Miss Taylor 
decided to stick to the legitimate stage. * * * 
In short, no praise is too high for this Peg 
of the screen. She is an artist par excellence. 

TIMES — So it is not a distinctly cinemato- 
graphic piece that has come out of the adap- 
tation. The screen version is rather a trans- 



literation than a translation of the play. But, 
after all, this is what was to be expected, 
and, all things considered, there is, it would 
seem, no cause for regret. For what most 
people want to see is as near an approach 
as possible to the original "Peg o' My 
Heart." Those who saw the play want to see 
it again, and those who missed it want as 
much of it as they can get. Therefore they 
will welcome this skillfully made substitute, 
which, if not just as good, is just about as 
good as a substitute can be. 

HERALD — One can not describe Miss 
Taylor with the adjectives which must be 
used over and over again in movie reviews. 
To call her "adroit" would be to damn her 
with faint praise. She is divine. Her ges- 
tures, her expressions, her very innermost 
thoughts are perfect. She overdoes nothing; 
she never puts over her points with a slap- 
stick ; she is superlatively delicate and sub- 
tle ; and yet there is never a moment when 
her essential force is not apparent to the 
most unsensitive eye. * * * 

"Peg o' My Heart," as a whole, is a sin- 
gularly beautiful picture. It has been di- 
rected with much skill and with genuine 
sympathy by King Vidor, and it is con- 
trolled by intelligence throughout. 

EVENING WORLD— It has been a long 
while since there has been a more enjoyable 
film than "Peg o' My Heart." * * * 

EVENING SUN—* * * Wonders which 
have been wrought by good photography and 
fine and diversified direction by King Vidor 
which make you forget you ever saw the 
spoken original. Miss Taylor is as inimita- 
ble as ever in the title role. * * * The es- 
sential part of the humor has been preserved, 
and an exceptional supporting cast * * * 
lend themselves to a gem of a picture which 
Metro has turned loose on the world 

MAIL — Laurette Taylor's acting makes 
a thoroughly pleasing and entertaining pic- 
ture of "Peg o' My Heart" at the Capitol 
this week. With anyone else in the part J. 
Hartley Manners' stage success might not 
have fared so well on the screen, for the 
play has little of the material generally deem 
ed essential to a successful film. 

TELEGRAM— The picturization of J. 
Hartley Manners' best known play has been 
skilfully made by King Vidor for Metro. 



Mr. Vidor has given pictorial and human 
vitality to the fascinating tale. * *~ * 

GLOBE — Her creators have managed to 
do as much with the movies as they did on 
the stage, and in some ways a little bit more. 
It is doubtful, very doubtful, that even Mary 
Pickford, the almost unanimous choice for 
the movie Peg, could have done more with 
the part than Miss Taylor. The distinguished 
actress plays with all the care-free, reckless 
abandon the cinema portrayal calls for, even 
to doing what is technically known as "a 
fall." 



"Dark Secrets"— F. P.-L. 
Rialto 

MORNING WORLD— The picture is 
good screen melodrama, with some excel- 
lent photography and reams of celluloid 
hokum. 

AMERICAN — Miss Dalton has done bet- 
ter things. Emotionally she did what chil- 
dren call "pull faces," and the close-ups, of 
course, made these too manifest. But I 
like her personality, and I can never forget 
low charming she was out of the films and 
in "Aphrodite." Jose Ruben was really 
capital. 

TRIBUNE— Dorothy Dalton plays Ruth 
Rutherford pleasantly and naturally. * * * 
Jose Ruben is very attractive as Mohammed 
Ali. 

EVENING WORLD— The story, written 
especially for the star by Edmund Goulding, 
s a novelty and deals with a myst c surgeon. 
It's all very tense and thrilling and really 
makes a corking good afternoon or even- 
ing's entertainment. Miss Dalton is espe- 
cia'ly good in a part that fits her like a 
rubber glove. 

EVENING SUN— The film is quite enter- 
tain. ng on account of its timeliness, in view 
t the interest the little Frenchman from 
Xai.cy has caused in this country. * * * In 
act we consider this one of Miss Dalton's 
most interesting vehicles. 

JOURNAL — "Dark Secrets" is a good 
picture * * * well acted * * * and well di- 
ected. * * * 



"Milady"— Amer. Releasing! 
Cameo 

MORNING WORLD— It has mu 
conspiracy, and passion, and love, a 
forth. * * * We didn't get ver 
thusiastic about it. 

AMERICAN — However, "Milady,' 
with a company of excellent French : 
is diverting, attractive and artistic. 

MORNING TELEGRAPH— Romai 

not dead ! It lives and breathes agi 
the Cameo this week, where "Milady 
sequel to Alexandre Duma's "Three 
keteers" is holding forth in all the s»' 
of the Seventeenth Century. * * * 

It was taken in France by Henri 
mant Berger, and great care has been 
to the settings and costumes. 

TIMES — Coming so quietly that iij 
' e said almost to have sneaked in, a 1 
motion picture of remarkable quality ; 
day entered what one who enjoy 
keenly must hope will be a fully sue 
week at the Cameo. * * * The fil 1 
mains one of the most absorbing, ai 
ts separate scenes, one of the most fi 
lieces of dramatic cinematography th: 
brightened Broadway for a long tim 
it is less headlong and spectacular thi 
Fairbanks production, it is more Galli 
s closer to Dumas and to the Frat 
wrote of. 

EVENING WORLD— There is 

beautiful photography and some Fair 
like hand-to-hand sword conflicts, » 
rather good-looking and athletic 
Frenchman playing the Three- Muske 
leading role. 

If you like the romance of the days 
d'Artagnan was in style, you will re 
this picture. * * * 

EVENING SUN— While it doesn't 
the dash of the American version, thi 
duction has caught the courtly grace 
Duma's "Twenty Years After," and ci 
your pulses with its authentic setting 
chivalrous conduct as it tells you ' 
became of the dauntless trio after the 
wiped up most of France. 

TELEGRAM— "Milady" * * * feat : 
good programme at the Cameo * * * 
with thrills and spectacular moments th' 1 
out. * * * However, it is a distnic! 
complete story, well told. 



ASK YOUR WIFE— OR YOUR STENOGRAPHER 
—OR ANY WOMAN IN THE WORLD 

—IF ANYTHING COULD KEEP THEM FROM A THEATRE 

SHOWING A PICTURE CALLED 

"DON'T MARRY FOR MONEY" 

IT'S A THEME EVERY WOMAN HAS CONSIDERED PERSONALLY AT 
SOME TIME OR OTHER AND ONE THAT THE WHOLE WORLD IS 
TREMENDOUSLY INTERESTED IN. 

PRESENTED BY 

B. P. FINEMAN 

Story by HOPE LORING and LOUIS DURYEA LIGHTON Directed by CLARENCE L. BROWN 



, January 23, 1923 



its and Flashes 

Blythe has completed "The 
of Desire." 



i Christie will make her screen 
i "The Enemies of Women." 



of the Storm Country," feat- 
,ouise Fazenda, has been fin- 



Ford will direct Tom Mix 
ext production, "Three Jumps 



offices of the United States M. 
p., have been moved to the 
Idg. 



staurant has been opened at 
smopolitan studio for the use 
loyees. 



:. Exhibitors will release the 
MacManus production, "Tents 
h," Feb. 25. 



ie Mayo, scenario writer for 
Hamilton, has completed his 
year with the comedian. 



les Tyrol Prod, have just 

work on a series of pictures 

:ase on the state right market. 



Wise Cracker," a Fox 

r, will be released Feb. 4 in- 

of Jan. 21, as originally 

led. and "Young and Dumb" 

instead of Jan. 21. 



Coue Picks Short Story 
Emile Coue has selected a two-reel 
educational story, written by Elmore 
Leffingwell, handling publicity for 
M. Coue in connection with his 
visit to this country. M. Coue 
rejected all scenarios that were 
based on fiction or romance, and 
in which he was invited to appear 
as an actor, and which offered 
large financial benefits to him 
personally. He approved the edu- 
cational script which merely illus- 
trated the outstanding points of 
his theory as set forth in his lectures, 
and his personal appearance in this 
film is limited to an explanation of 
his beliefs. 

The two-reel educational film will 
be made by Motion Picture Arts, 
Inc., at its New Rochelle studio 
and will be distributed by Edu- 
cational Films, Inc. The proceeds 
of the film will be applied to found- 
ing a Coue Institute in New York 
City, and M. Coue will derive no 
personal benefits at all. as has been 
his policy in the matter of the sev- 
eral books published regarding his 
work and the conducting of public 
lectures. 

"The cinema," stated M. Coue, 
"is one of the most important 
agencies in existence for the wide 
dissemination of an educational mes- 
sage, on an entertainment basis. As 
a teacher I desire to have its help, 
but I have no ambitions as an actor 
and do not wish to be financially 
benefitted. This educational screen 



Franklin Signed By Warners 

Sidney Franklin, who recently fin- 
ished "Brass," has been signed for a 
number of years to produce for 
Warner Bros. 



Los Angeles — Sidney Franklin will 
direct the next Constance Talmadge 

production. 



Two Accused of Theft 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Robert Marley, ship- 
ping clerk at the Ince studios, and 
D. K. Reed, until last October con- 
nected with Famous Players, have 
been arrested and placed in the 
county jail by Deputy Sheriff J. B. 
Fox. 

Marley is charged with stealing 
the films and Reed with receiving 
stolen property. According to 
Deputy Sheriff Fox, hundreds of pic- 
tures were stolen and sold to the 
Oriental Film Co., with offices in 
the Stock Exchange building. The 
films were then sent to Japan, Fox 
declared, and many productions were 
shown in the Orient before they were 
here. The monev involved may 
amount to $1,000,000. 

Reed and Marley are specifically 
charged with the grand larceny of 
two films — "Love," and "Skin Deep." 



Coast Brevities 

(Social to THE FILM DAILY) 
Hollywood — ■ Tom Forman will 
direct "April Showers." Colleen 
Moore and Kenneth Harlan will head 
the cast. 



Kathleen Clifford has been engaged 
by Al Christie. 



Mae Busch has signed for five 
years with Goldwyn. 



Gerrard Grassby has been added to 
the cast of "Trimmed in Scarlet." 



Albert G. Kenyon is adapting 
Elizabeth Alexander's Saturday Even- 
ing Post, "The Self Made Wife," 
for Universal. 



story is the only one I have author- 
ized or will authorize for the present, 
and the many flattering offers are 
declined with deep and sincere 
thanks." 



Willard Louis will have the prin- 
cipal supporting role in "Up the 
Ladder," in which Reginald Denny 
and Virginia Valli will be co-starred. 



William H. Clifford will direct 
"Power" at Fine Arts. The cast 
will include Pat O'Malley, Clee Madi- 
son, Otte Lederer, Frank Hayes, 
Gene Crosby and Leen Artigue. 
Lynn Darling is camereaman. 



The cast of Emory Johnson's 
"Westbound 99" for F. B. O. includes 
Ralph Lewis, Ella Hall, Claire Mc- 
Dowell, Johnny Harren, Taylor 
Graves, Wedgewood Newell, Red 
Kirby, Richard Morris and Jane Mor- 

H. E. GAUSMAN. 



THE SUPER 39 

"THE GO-GETTER" 

with T. ROY BARNES, SEENA OWEN, WILLIAM NORRIS, 

TOM LEWIS and LOUIS WOLHEIM. 

By Peter B. Kyne. Scenario by John Lynch. Directed by E. H. Griffith. 

A COSMOPOLITAN PRODUCTION 

Released April 8th 



i mm | 



No. 17 



THIS is one of the most remarkable 
stories of the century. It was publish- 
ed as a small volume, and its inspirational 
values was so great that banks, department 
stores, factories, etc., bought copies by the 
thousand for distribution to employees. Over 
a million copies were sold, and in fame it 
rivals "A Message to Garcia." 



Cosmopolitan has made it on a big scale, 
with an all star cast. Every bit of dramatic 
and comic value has been brought out and 
intensified. It's a real story of modern life, 
with romance, adventure, heart-appeal and 
all the other box-office elements in profusion. 
"The Go-Getter" will get the money. 



No. 


2 


"Dark Secret*. " 


No. 


$ 


"My American Wife." 


No. 


4 


"Drums of Fate." 


No. 


5 


"Nobody's Money." 


No. 


6 


"Adam'a Rib." 


No. 


7 


"Jara Head." 


No. 


8 


"The White Flower." 


No. 


9 


"Adam and Era." 


MMMMlMMia 




FAMOUS P1AYERSLASKY CORPORATION 

. ADOLON ZUKQB <W>'< 




No. 


10 


"Racing HearU" 


No. 


11 


"The Nth Commandment" 


No. 


12 


"Mr. Billing! Spends Hit Diate 


No. 


13 


"The Glimpses of the Moon." 


No. 


14 


"The Leopardess." 


No. 


15 


"Bella Donna." 


No. 


16 


"Grumpy." 



& (paramount (picture 



WATCH THIS 

SPACE 

TOMORROW 

FOR 

No. 18 




Tuesday, January 23, 19j 



to keep 5000 seats 



filled for a week 

requires a real picture 




WESTEJ 



TBI* 

^ after ft**S&-i -== 




« H0SbL ^ if IS HO* <S!B 

ajufftt pic-cobs w **»*»* is ju- 

^ ^0Dfl» «** ** EIU - ptCf0BE YOU COULD SO* 

^ im cab* i**n*» ** * M **** 



Edwin Carewe 





A Symphony of Life in the High and L' 
Places by Curtis Benton. Directed by EdU 
Carewe. Sol Polito, Cameraman; John 
Schulze, Art Director; Philip Masi, Assist* 
Director. 



Watch it at THE CHICAGO 

Balaban & Katz palatial Chicago house 

A 3ir>6t tlationdl Picture 




. _JTHE 

7ho BYSTREET 




Borzage Signed 

oductions To Be Released Through 
First National— Tender Him 
Luncheon Today 
frank Borzage's future productions 
I be released through First Na- 
lal. The first will be "Wandering 
ughters," a Dana Burnet story. 
Jorzage is under contract to Ar- 
r H. Jacobs and intends starting 
rk on "Wandering Daughters" as 
n as he finishes "The Nth Com- 
ndment" for Cosmopolitan. To- 
' at the Ritz Carlton, First Na- 
ial will introduce Borzage and 
obs to the trade and fan maga- 
b editors. Richard A. Rowland 
other First National officials will 
:nd. 

Committee Leaves 
'he executive committee of First 
:ional has completed its work. The 
ious members have departed for 
ir homes. 



• C. Pictures Alleged Bankrupt 

n involuntary petition in bank 
:cy has been filed in the U. S Dis- 
Court against C. C. Pictures. Inc. 
hamel S. Corwin has been ap- 
ted receiver. The company is dis- 
cing the 12 Chaplin Classics. 

Film Folk at Premiere 

-actically all the important exec- 
58 in the East attended the 
uere of "Extra" last night at the 
?acre Theater. "Extra" was 
ten and produced by Tack Ali- 
t of THE FILM DAILY. 

Vray Here; Signs With Ince 

hn Griffith Wray arrived in town 
Monday from the coast. Yes- 

■y he confirmed the report from 
Angeles that he had signed a 

•act with Thomas H. Ince to 

t three and possiblv four pic- 

• Wray is at the Biltmore, and 
;:kmg material and talent to take 

to California with him. 



Sht^dSS'from^ S± T inger PrCdUCti ° n " is a *«™ 



! Claims Usury 

Selznick in Court Action Seeks 
(unction for Return of $28,525 

Interest 
J"S J. Selznick has filed suit in 
,'Upreme Court against Jacob 

■ and the T. & T. Films, Inc., 
Mg usury, and asking an injunc- 
M the return of $28,525 which 

id .as interest on a loan of 
"0 m excess of the legal rate 
<eges that prior to May 5, 1921 
•?ohated with Wener for the 

1 w 3 " an l m , ads an agreement 
1 Wener $700 a week for the 
•n addition to the interest of 
•' :ent. 

(Continued on Page 6) 



The Market Abroad 



England to Be Busy 

Producers Planning Pictures Which 
Will Find Place in Interna- 
tional Market 



m ^ y E RNEST W.FREDVAN 

The Film Renter and M. P. News, London 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
London — Nineteen hundred and 
twenty-three promises to be a very 
busy year for the British producing 
companies, judging by the ambitious 
plans that the leading producers have 
scheduled for the ensuing 12 months. 
Graham Wilcox have already pro- 
duced "Paddy-The-Next- Best-Thing," 
featuring Mae Marsh, and this will 
be shown to the trade inside the next 
three weeks. They have secured a 
capture in the world's rights of "Chu 
Chin Chow," which is to be produced 
with part of it in Prizma color, with 
scenes laid in Algiers. Herbert Wil- 
cox the controlling genius of the 
Graham Wilcox Co.. informs me that 
the cost of this production will not 
be less than £60,000, and some big 
stars will appear in the picture. This 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Germans May Cease 

Production Expected to End— Ex- 
ports from Berlin Reach Enor- 
mous Proportions 



Rights Revert 

Chaplin Secures Rights to a "Dog's 

Life in April and "Shoulder 

Arms" in October 

Charlie Chaplin shortly secures all 

dfr H Arm '^ T D ° g '\ Life and "Shoul 

he J» r whatever disposition 

he may care to make of them under 

«ct Tl ° f thC FlVst Nati0nal »" 
r£hh V 1 ! -u ,rcult mere 'y has the 

five ye°ars bUtC them f ° r a P eriod ° f 

Do r e' S Ap i ri i" hat p r°- d expires on " A 

<>^ g ij * and In October on 
Shoulder Arms." It is intimated on 
the coast, that Chaplin intends re- 
issuing them but no mention is made 
of the releasing medium. 

daS C nf 0l lr in fi g are the ex P'' r ation 
r- iff ^ e five year distribution 

nghts on the Chaplin releases. 

?,°^Life A 192 

Shoulder Arms Oct. .. 1923 

t™ Y % d f ^22, 1924 

Pdle S r fJ eaSUre Dec - 22 ^24 

K-J Day Mar. 20, 1927 

Kld Feb. 21, 1927 



Lynch En Route to Paris 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Atlanta-S. A. Lynch is en route to 
I^ans and is expected to arrive there 
on Saturday. He will remain on the 
Continent indefinitely. 



(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Berlin— The impending stoppage 
of production owing to the rise of 
raw stock price— one point of a six- 
reel feature costs 1,000,000 marks- 
is the chief topic of conversation. 

The optimists have a strong argu- 
ment in their favor. An enormous 
amount of German films has been 
recently sold to foreign countries, 
and the safes and "foreign currency 
accounts" of the producing firms are 
literally crammed with valuable 
foreign money. 

The Emelka, in Munich, was on 
the verge of bankruptcy. The banks 
refused to supply funds for com- 
pleting half finished pictures. Wil- 
liam Fox then bought "Monna 
Vanna, ' for $50,000, and the deficit 
accumulated by Emelka was wiped 
off. The U. F. A. recently bought 
up Decla Bioscop. The incorporated 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Berger Joins Tri- Stone 

'ci'-i K " Berger has resigned as 
A P r^ a f re P resen *ative for United 
Artists to manage the sales of the 
Keystone reissues through Tri-Stone 
Pictures. 



"Doug" Plans Grecian Story 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles-It is reported that 
Doug Fairbanks will produce a 
story laid in the times of Pericles 
and that he and Edward Knoblock 
are collaborating on the script The 
Times quotes Fairbanks as saying 
that he was tremendously interested 
in appearing in a story of that 
period. 



T. O. C. C. Breaks With F. I. L M 
Club 

A resolution was adopted at yes- 
terday's meeting of the T O C C 
in which the F. I. L. M. Club was 
charged with not acting in good faith. 
As a result the T. O. C. C. will with- 
draw all representation from the 
Arbitration Board, which has hereto- 
fore been comprised of representa- 
tives from both organizations and 
which had settled all film lisoutes 



Wednesday, January 24, 1923 





MXXliTNiT^Wednesday, jan ! j4j|23 Pricejjent5 



rooTrieht 1923, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 

B3£ KS^fc-*- and Editor; 
T W Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
i'iTCT •' J A Cron, Advertising Manager, 
ifed asVecond-class matter May 21. 1918 
it the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. .. 

TeW (Postage free) United States. Outs.de 
ofGreater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
monthT $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00. Subscribers should rem.tw.th order 
Address all communications to IHt hlm 
A DAILY. 71-73 West 44th St New York 

N Y 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California— Harvey E. Gausman 

6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 

Chicago Representative— Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. .. _. . 

London Representative— Ernest W t red- 
man The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Are., London, W. 1. , 

Paris Representative— Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Central 7 ' European Representative— Interna- 
rionale Filmschau, Prague (Czechoslo- 
vakia) , Wenzelsplatz. 



Germany May Cease 



(Continued from Page 1) 
company had no ready cash, but some 
valuable negatives, amongst them 
"Mude Tod," which was eventually 
sold to America and England as 
"Destiny" and this sale, together 
with others, enabled the U. F. A. to 
turn out a dividend of Mjc tor 
1921-22. 

Similar conditions prevail ap- 
parently with other companies. The 
London Biocraft Film Co. is about 
to finish its first Anglo-German 
picture. The Atlantic Enterprises 
Inc of New York has completed 
"Saved by Radio," its first production 
under direction of Frank G. Kirby, 
with Dorothy Barker in the lead. 
Dimitri Buchowetzki has concluded 
a deal with Svenaks Biografteatern, 
and will work with Swedish concern. 
The Foreign Film Corp.. in which 
American capital is largely interested 
is working on its first film Fifth 
Avenue." Harry Piel, the stunt actor, 
has left the Bavarian Emelka to go 
with the Apex Co. of London. 



Quotations 



High 

East. Kod. 97*4 

F. P.-L. . . 8654 

do pfd. . 95 
G'wyn . . . 6% 



Low Close 

965/g 965/g 
84*4 84^ 
95 95 
6 



Sales 
700 

5.000 
300 
2,000 



Griffith Not q u „°^ 

Loew's .. 19J4 19 1954 2.600 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not <l uoted 

Incorporations 

Springfield, 111. — Kedzie Amus. 
Co., Chicago. Incorporators, G. Zatt, 
A. N. and D. Felton. 

Albany— Photo Play Music Co. 
Manhattan. Capital, $25,000. Incor- 
porators, E. and M. Luz, B. Herbert. 
Attorney, J. Frey. 

Springfield, 111.— DeKalb Theater 
Co., Inc., DeKalb. Capital, $75,000. 
Incorporators, D. A. Leifkeit, E. P. 
Ellwood and P. W. Pisk. 

Albany — Adams Picture Craft 
Travels, Manhattan. Capital, $10,000. 
Incorporators, H. J. Curtis, J. J. 
Sameth. Attorney, M. Knapp. 

Albany— Valograph Picture Corp.. 
Manhattan. Capital. $5,000 F. J. 
Valentine, N. S. Minoifi and E. r. 
Hinderer. Attorney, J. A. Boyle. 

Oklahoma City — Strand Theater, 
Tulsa. Capital stock $10,000. Incor- 
porators: Gladys Brest, C. R. Thurl- 
well and Hazel McCoy, all of Tulsa. 

Albany— Combined Theater Corp., 
Manhattan. Capital, $40,000. Incor- 
porators, R. Haserman and H. D. 
Maftus. . Attorney, S. Hoffman, Man- 
hattan. 



Beaver in Town 
J Howard Beaver, manager of the 
Lichtman exchange in Washington, 
was in town yesterday. 

Leave on World Tour Today 

Julian Saenger and E. V. Richards 
leave on their world tour today. 



Madrid Theaters Close 

The Associated Press reported yes- 
terday from Madrid that theaters 
there' will close beginning today be- 
cause managers find it impossible to 
operate under the present tax bur- 
den. 



"U" To Screen "Naughty Marietta" 
Universal is to make a screen ver- 
sion of "Naughty Marietta." Plans 
for the production are already well 
under way. It is probable that 
"Naughty Marietta" will be used as a 
vehicle "for Virginia Valli. Screen 
rights were secured through Jacob 
Wilk. 






IctlAUU-S 



Roach Staff Plans Theater 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles— The employees at 
the Hal Roach studio, which have 
a business organization known as 
the Studio Film Laboratories, intend 
building a 1.500 seat theater here. 
The organization is headed by Wal- 
lace Lundin, president; Charles Par- 
rot, vice-president and L. J. Murphy, 
secretary and treasurer. 




New Hart Contract With F. P.-L. 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles— It is reported that 
William S. Hart.will return to the 
screen after two years, starting work 
on the Lasky lot the early part of 
March. It is said that he signed 
a contract with Famous for four six- 
reelers when he was in New York. 



No confirmation of the above was 
obtainable yesterday at Famous Play- 



ers. 



KEYSTONE 
COMEDY REVIVAL 

CHARLIE CHAPLIN 



in 



Dough and Dynamite 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN 



in 



Caught in a Cabaret 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN 



in 



TRIANGLE 
PICTURES 



H. E. Aitken 
Oscar A. Price 



His Trysting Place 

These world-famed comedy successes will 
be included in our initial series. 

SYDNEY CHAPLIN 

is now re-editing them in California, and, as 
such, they will be fully protected by copyright. 
All theatres are warned against the use of 
dupes or unauthorized prints, of these sub- 
jects, as all violations will be vigorously pros- 
ecuted. ______ 

TRI-STONE PICTURES, Inc. 

STRAUS BUILDING 
565 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY 



KEYSTONE 
COMEDIES 



THE 




<Vt Broadway Theaters 

Capitol 

Divertissements in the first unit; (a) Inter 
^°' Cava " erla Rusticana," b) Ba"lad 
When Love Comes Stealing/' sung by Fred 
igel and Evelyn Herbert ( c ) "Tin, T,kT 
ere a Musique," Mile. Gambarrelle Prim, 
•Henna (d) Nola a silhouette Alexander 
umansky Dons Nile, and Thalia Zanou 
be Capitol Magazine is next, followed bv 
presentation of "Peg C My Heart" thl 
iture. An organ soil is the finale^number 

Cameo 

ref-.M L ^V^h7tt?r U e tl£ l,^;H 
organ rendered by John Priest is l as t 

Rialto 

The Sorcerer's Apprentice" and Riesen- 
s Classical Jazz, played by the Rialto 
■HirtV P ? ,a " £ Pr0gram - Evelyn R Law 

|wS.;L^ f ?o tt w7n^Se n f 

&- Br '&; .,?' loW ^rnon-l 
itch," complete the presentation 

Strand 

tcerpts from "Lucia di Lammermoor" ;« 

^ «r> , ,, £ Ten 'maker," consisting 

Onentale" Strand Male Quartet b? 

; e nH°M n « ale ' MUes - Klementoiicz x'iche 
ose^Es?e1Ie m ^ n; (c) " Ni ^tingal e and 

ttrl'^ M,i ,? arey ' s °P ran ° assisted by 
a short ill Q ^ artet - "Chicken Dress 
a short reel and an organ solo finish 

At Other Houses 



Barry Back With Century 

(Specal to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles— Eddie Barry has re 

turned to the Century lot ^f er an 

absence of a year. an 

Buys Chaplins for Southeast 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Atlanta-Savini Films, Inc have 
acquired for Southeastern distribution 

ei e ea S se r d eS on f " Chap " a Clasaicl tj'be 
-ased one a month. 



Coast Brevities i| — 



New Independent 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Chicago-Progress Pictures Corp 

has been formed here by Al Goldman' 

Thomas Leonard, and John Olsen' 

capital $20,000. J uisen, 

Blackwood's New Company 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

exDe cteriT le t~". P ^ ggy Bla <*wood is 
expected to start her own company 

DaXecTh H1 thC nCar futUre " t0 b * 
frn \* y a group of mini 'ng men 
trom Montana. 



he Third Alarm" continues at the Astor 
rion still houses "Salome," "Huntine 
ja me in Africa" runs on indefinite^ a? 

en Nights in a Hallroom," is 
title of a new Hallroom Boy 



Grauman Plans Policy Change 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

, Los , Angeles— Sid Grauman will 

close h ls Million Dollar Theater "or 

Son"' ^ r CekS t0 permit ac- 
tions. The house will re-open under 
a two show a day policy. 

C J iffor d With Sanford Prod 

(Specml to THE FILM DAILY) 

. Los Angeles— Sanford Prod have 
signed W. H. Clifford to direct the 

Pa' gEll t0 be „" P ° Wer " in whch 
Sn f51 7- WlH appean Produc- 
tion at the Fine Arts studio. 



(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
«* in "ReJ lSJS ."' temp ° ranI ^ to 

yo?o7^ r Ss^T p P Iet , d '' Can - 

rect his next *' Paul wil1 di " 

Ho^Gl^S^UPi;' earring 

I" Single Handed " been Changed to 

"The Rustle of Silk " U^u <. 
Brenon's first production for ?"' 
mount has been started Para " 

Wives V Want " wliPprodu ce "What 

. Vokroff^^w^T'Sw^ £"* 
I adapting. Lowe < J r - is 

Agnes Ayres, back at the Laskv 

rIirSf nt p ry has Sin ^ ed Jim Davis to 
direct Brownie the first to be "oS 

write^ and 1 *",?■ Jimmy Adams to 

•Til: Nigit^w^ his first to be 

th P Ch T arleS a A - Goss, dramatic critic of 
the Los Angeles Evening Express 

for 5 Wis? CoV? ST™ publ -ity man 
, Wes . 1 c °ast theaters. Clem Pon P 
has res.gned as director of p^bndtv 

We. CoasT S ^ ho ^ t0 be «>™ 
west Coast exploitation manager. 

H. E. GAUSMAN. 



4)ftttcmre (txnparafam 

RESOURCES - $5,000,000 
Knickerbocker Building 
Broadway at 42nd Street, N. T. City 




International Du/hinten of 
MOTION [PICTURES ; 



1 to-OcFAN Film Corporation r 



INT E R-O C EAN B &&$&$& 

218 WEST 42nd ST;:- NKw ^. 

BRYA.NT78u;V"V"-. 
k WHEN YOU THINKS 
FOREIGN THISJK -of 

INTER-aCE^M 




ART TITLES 

LOUIS MEYER 

Craftsmen Film Lab 

251 Weat 19th St. 

Watldna 7260-7461 




All Roads 
Lead to- 




England to Be Busy 



(Continued from Page 1) 
mpany have also secured 



the 



Newspaper Opinions I St. Louis Notes 



"Omar the Tentmaker"— First Nafl 
Strand 



SlTngnT for-Loyalt.es/' the 
ilsworthy Play, which is playing 
nultaneously in London and New 

Stoll's will schedule a number of 
K pictures for release this year. 
? he Prodigal Son," the Hall Came 
ory on which close upon £40,000 
[ s been spent, is now completed and 
ill be due for showing at the end 
this month. It is reported that 
,e total length of this picture will 
t in the neighborhood of 20,000 feet, 
id will be released in two parts. 
toll's are also producing another 
herlock Holmes series in addition 
> an eight or nine reeler of Ihe 
ign of Four," one of the stones 
rhich made Sir Conan Doyle fam- 
us Two other pictures that they 
nil produce are "The Wandering 
ew " with Matheson Lan* in the 
itle role, and "Guy Fawkes for re- 
^ase on Nov. 5th. All these pictures 
rill be produced on a lavish scale 
rith a view to obtaining an mterna- 
ional market. 

Gaumont's have equally ambitious 
>lans for the forthcoming year and 
n particular, following Colonel 
Bromhead's visit to the United States 
heir production will be made partic- 
jlarly for the American market. At 
the present moment they are en- 
gaged upon a screen adaptation of 
"Bonnie Prince Charlie" and hen- 
full programme for the year will be 
announced in the course of the next 
few days. 

Welsh Pearson, who has been 
responsible for many fine pictures, 
notably "The Better 'Oe and 
"Squibs" havt a big subject for re- 
lease in September. This is none 
other than "Nell Gwynne, featuring 
the British star, Betty Balfour. 
Every endeavor is to be made to 
make this a worthwhile production, 
and it should be one of the outstand- 
ing releases for 1923. In addition 
there will be a sequel to "Squibs en- 
titled "Squibs M. P." 

Hepworth's have a number of pic- 
tures that they are starting im- 
mediately upon, as also have Samuel- 
son's, who is offering in the next few 
weeks his latest picture of A Royal 
Divorce." 

Ideal's look like being very big 
in 1923. They have "The Harbour 
Lights," made by Tom Ternss, and 
featuring Tom Moore, "Mary Queen 
of Scots," directed by Dennison Uitt, 
and "This Freedom," also directed 
by Clift. There will also be a series 
of "Scarlet Pimpernel" pictures, from 
the well known novels by Baroness 
Orczy, and a number of others. 

British production in 1923 looks to 
have a bigger year than ever in its 
history, and as producers in this 
country are alive to the value of an 
international market it would seem 
that they should find their way to 
the screens of the world. 

Progress Buys "Shopgirl" 
Progress Pictures, Inc., of San 
Francisco, has purchased Only a 
Shopgirl" for California, Nevada, 
Arizona and Hawaii 



TRIBUNE— There are plenty of beautiful 
scenes and a lot of photography which is fine 
nut they are linked together into a p.cture 
which becomes unbelievably dull. 

MAIL— All the oriental color and tfmos- 
S^ul^o^bfa^e^esented^ 

'thetiUe role in the stage success, is supported 
by an excellent cast. 

SUN— It is an excellent picture of its kind. 
Cornprised as it is of spectacle, me lodrama 
romance and many scenes of real poetic 
beauty "Omar" p/obably offers more, enterj 
tinment as a picture than as a play. " 

" "niov a spectacular show here is the 
Very p" oToptay for you. If such things bore 
you stiff, however, stay away because t is 
I conventional, though good, exponent of 
fts tvne * * * the Shah played by Noah Beery 
* ' yP * was acted so flashily that it came 
near to overshadowing the role of Omar. 

rT nBF Tames Young has done a good 

ioi? of direct nT Richard Walton Tully has 
prov?ded an effective setting. There is noth- 
ing new, however, in design or scenery. 
The acting is satisfactory and even. Mr. 
Post is too old, of course, to be a convinc- 
ing youth, but he makes amends in the latter 
part of the picture. 

EVE WORLD— It is a beautiful theme, 
beauHfully done in the way ^that^ Richard 
Walton Tully knows so well. Witn gooa 

acting an entrancing story, excellent com- 
pany and rather remarkable photography, 
"Omar the Tentmaker" should have impress- 
ed us more. 

TELEGRAM— The final fadeout of Omar 
n . Tentmaker" * * marked the definite 
ntry of Richard Walton Tully into the field 
of super producers. As for Guy Bates Post, 
S he had P not already won that distinction by 
is work in "The Masquerader," final recog- 
, tioTas a cinema artist of most consummate 
ability cannot be withheld from him now. 

DAILY NEWS— It is beautifully set and 
photographed, it has its «n° m ™ ts r of , t dra ££ e 
and with one exception is well cast lhe 
exception, we must state, is Mr. Post. VV # 
do not think he is a good enema actor. 
In these later episodes we thought Mr Post s 
imDersonation very much better, and the 
scenes where he is placed in the torture chair 
he endowed with real dignity. 



(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
St Louis— Ross Denny of Rood- 
house, 111. has sold the Dreamland. 

Carl Muff has bought the house at 
Shelbina, Mo. from J. E. Huggins. 



F G Conklin, special representa- 
tive for Hope Hampton Prod, is ex- 
pected in St. Louis shortly. 

Lehr Bros, have bought out the in- 
terests of Morris Reichman in his 
South St. Louis circuit. 

The Kil Kare, Wood River, 111., 
owned by Wahl & Worchester, was 
destroyed by fire. 

Capital Increases 

Albany, N. Y.— Hampton Play 
Corp, of New York has increased 
capital from $40,000 to $75,000. The 
^■tuvvesant Theater Corp., New York, 
from $500,000 to $1,000,000. 

The Chester Picture Corp. has 
changed their name to Chester In- 
ter'al Pictures, Inc., and increased 
capital from $900,000 to $3,500 000 



After Exteriors 

The All-Star comedy troupe under 
supervision of Richard Thorpe, has 
gone to St. Augustine, Fla., for ex- 
teriors. 

i nn- 

New Coast Company 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles— The Royal Union 
Film Ass'n, a new independent, has 
filed papers of incorporation here. 



S HBBBBHF 



MADE TO ORDER 



Commercial Developing and Printing 



Have Your Titles 

Made the Right Way 
Quality — Quantity 
24 hour Service 

FARINA & OGLE 

Title Photographers 
At Claremont Laboratories 
430 Claremont Parkway 
Tel. Bingham 2100 




"Robin Hood" opens at the Capitol 
Sunday 



A drama on chained passions on the edge 
of the white man's world. 

For drama, for the unusual, for the spectacular and 
sensational "animal stuff," see 

"THE RED TRAIL" 

Featuring NORA SWINBURNE 



NORCA PICTURES, Inc. 1540 Broadway, N.Y. City 




Booked by Finkelstein & Rubin— 

"THE HERO" 

A Gasnier Production 

Will be shown in their big houses. It's a picture 
with real box office power. And it's one of the 

Preferred 8. 



PREFERRED 
PICTURESInc. 

8-P Sdwlberp -Pm JC-Bwhtnann -I***. 



Di tin beted b* 

AL-LICHTMAN 



Wednesday, January 24, 1923 



THE 




a 



A Box Office Suggestion 

Put on an 

OLD MELODY WEEK 

As outlined in the music cue for this great heart interest picture 
Everybody loves the old tunes - Here's a picture built to play 
a symphony on the human heart strings. Wonderful music -and 
Picture entertainment. A rare chance to give the kind of show 
they all love. 

Edwin Carewe 

present^ t 



M 





J! symphony of life in the high axB low places 
by (hirtisltenton -Directed byWmn Cxewe 

Sol Polite, Cameraman, John D. Schulze, Art Director, Philip Masi, R 

Assistant Director. 



The Successor to "Humoresque" 
"The Miracle Man" and "Over the Hill" 







A 3ixat national Picture 



Claims Usury 

m (Continued from Page 1) 

>i>lznick states that to cover up the 
ll: >ged "corrupt and usurious agree- 
n, nt" Wener induced him to make 
Contract by which Select Pictures 
S.uld transfer to a corporation to be 
K-med by Wener, certain films in 
Tiich the Talmadge sisters appeared 
oith rights for the United States until 
is>cember, 1924. He alleges that the 
ilfendant corporation was organized 

r that purpose and the plaintiff was 
impelled to pay Wener $700 a week 
s assistant to the general manager 
-w^lynirk savs he has paid i^SU'^ 

r the loan "of $175,000, or $28,525 
h excess of the legal rate, and he 

ants it back. He quit paying on 
yec 16 and says Wener and the 
,f>poration are now threatening to 
,.11 all the stock of the corporation 
Jjnd the film licenses that were trans- 
e »rred to it. 

t Three Sales on "Yankee Doodle" 

" George M. A. Fecke has returned 
rom a" trip to Washington Pitts- 
burgh and Buffalo where he sold 
"'Yankee Doodle Jr." in Washington 
,o DeLuxe, to Vimy Film in Pitts- 
burgh and to Niagara Pictures in 
^Buffalo, 
d 



Second Ready 

"Foolish Parents," the Second Ay- 
won offering to the state right mar- 
ket, has been finished and is ready for 
distribution. 

Another Independent 
(Special to THE FILM DA1L\) 
Los Angeles— Earl Montgomery 
has started work on "See Here a 
comedy; the first under his own ban- 
ner. 



Start Work on Kyne Story 

Tspeeial to THE FILM DAILY) 

San Francisco— The first of the 
Peter B. Kyne Stories, to be issued 
as short subjects by the Paul Gerson 
Pictures Corp. is under way. 

Collins With Schlank 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles - Monte Collins, 
formerly with Johnson & Von Her- 
berg. Portland, has been made head 
of the art dept. of Anchor Films. 

Franchise~Holders~a K Script 
C B C has developed a plan 
whereby the franchise holders of the 
"Six Box Office Winners will 
have a voice in the approval of the 
script. The plan starts with the 
third picture, "Temptation. 



Southeastern News 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Durham. N. C— Don Nichols has 
taken charge of the Durham Amuse- 
ment Co. 

Louisville -The new Kentucky, 
a first run house, has been opened 
here. 

Greensboro, N. C.-T. G. Latch 
las fully recuperated from a recent 
attack of influenza. 



Engineers Meet in May 

The usual Spring meeting of the 
Society of Motion Picture Engineers 
wdl be held at Atlantic City, May 
7-8-9-10. 



"Black Gold" Completed 
(Special to- THE FILM DAILY) 

Long Beach, Cal.-"Black GolcT 
has been just completed by fc.. o. 
Dver and Rex Thorpe for John F. 
Mills Prod. It is an educational 
showing the romance of oil. 



Columbia, S. C.-The Ideal, form- 
erly operated by S. A. Lynch, has 
been secured by L. T. Leste.. The 
Lynch lease has expired. 

Norfolk, Va.-"Skin Deep" was 
recently given a special showing to 
a 1 the'dfsabled men in the govern- 
ment hospitalatJh^avy_Yard J 



SIMPLEX TITLE SHOP 

220 W. 42nd St. 
Announces the .closing of » "ntract 
giving it exclusive sales rights on tne 
S FAMOUS STONE LIBRARY 
Over two million feet of selected shots 
as far back as 1897, negative and posi- 
tive are now made available for your 
requirements. 

Phone Bryant 0984-0985 



Gerson Plans Feature 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
11 San Francisco— Josef Swickard, 
^Fritzi Ridgeway and Virginia Faire 
Will appear in Paul Gerson s first feat- 
ure The corporation is now estab- 
lished in its permanent studio home 
at 1974 Page St. 



*WE NEVEB DISAPPOINT" 



New Non-Theatrical Company 
(Special to THE FILM DATLY) 
Dover, Del. - The Herald-Non- 
Theatrical Picture Corp. has been in- 
corporated here by Graham Patter- 
son Rae D. Henkle and Clarence C. 
Chester, all of New York. Capital 
is listed at $5,000,000 



^^^ -INCORPORATED^ 



PHONE 
BRYANT 5576 



, INCORPORATED 

22dWEST42*fi STREET 
: - NEW VORK . 



ALLAN A.LCWNES [ 
GEN. MGE. 



I is listed at ^,«™.«™' __ 

THlTSUPER 39 

OR1A SWANSON 

"Prodigal Daughters 




No. 18 



in 



Scenario by Monte M. Katterjohn. 
From the novel by Joseph Hoek.ng. T ~n~x T 

A SAM WOOD PRODUCTION 

Released April 15th 



A JAZZY story of the modern girl's 
rebellion against convention. A sub- 
ject that everyone is talking about drama- 
tized in a vivid, thrilling manner. The book 
is a best seller, and a photoplay edition, with 
scenes from the play, will soon be put on 
sale throughout the country. 

"Dark Secrets." n 

"My American W'te. 
"Drums of Fate." 
"Nobody's Money 
"Adam's Rib." 
"lava Head." 
"the White Flower. 
"Adam and Eva. 




Big scenes include a marvelous bathing 
party, studio scenes in Greenwich Village, 
a thrilling aeroplane rescue, wild jazz par- 
ties-and the usual Swanson gowns. Cast 
includes Ralph Graves, Vera Reyno Id* 
Theodore Roberts, Louise Dresser, Charles 
Clary and Maude Wayne. 

No. 10 "Racing Heartt" 

No 11 "The Nth Commandment 

No 12 "Mr BiUinti Spend. Hi* D»« 

No' 13 "The Glimpses of the Moon. 

No 14 "The Leopardess. 

No' 15 "Bella Donna. 

No 16 "Grumpy- 

No. 17 "The Go-Getter." 



WATCH THIS 
SPACE 
MONDAY 
FOR 

No. 19 



llll^ggBiiiiiP^iiiW 



tic brAdstreet 

>/* FILMDOM 




3^'recocmizeb 
Authority 



. XXIII No. 24 



Thursday, January 25, 1923 



Price 5 Centt 



Copyright Change 

sion of Law to Be Submitted to 
:ernational Copyright Union — 
Before Congress Soon 

conference has just bejn con- 
id between the International 
:ing Trades Unions anl The 
ors' League at which ph ns have 

completed for a revision of the 
right law which will permit the 
ed States to join the Interna- 
1 Copyright Union, 
r years difficulties have been ex- 
nced with the existing copyright 
Df the United States, which has 
i it impossible for participation 
e International Copyright Union, 
e difficulties have been accentu- 
of recent years owing to many 
ges in the literary field and in 
lublishing industry, while condi- 

now make it possible to adjust 
iill to permit American participa- 

in the International Copyright 
(Continued on Pace 3) 



Corinne Griffith En Route 
rinne Griffith will arrive in New 
on Sunday to confer with 
les R. Rogers and Edward Small 
Section of a vehicle for the first 
action to be released through 
cinson. 



Installation Dinner Tonight 

e annual installation dinner of 
V. M. P. A. will be held tonight 
e Boulevard and will replace the 
Thursday lunch. John C. Flinn 
tew president is in California. 



Report Valentino Signs 

e Herald reported yesterday that 

»lph Valentino had signed a con- 
to appear over the Keith circuit 

',000 a week. At the Keith of- 
yesterday it was impossible to 

irm this. 



Rapf Picks First Three 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
s Angeles— Harry Rapf who, as 
1, has signed a new contract with 
ier Bros, will make "Wolf 
;s," "Lucretia Lombard" and 
adway After Dark." 



e Warner left for California yes- 

y. 



Pathe Threatens Suit 

the threatens to institute suit 
'St Mrs. Effie Tew, censor in 
iey, Colo, who ordered a cut in 
sue of Topics of the Day. The 
nation concerned censorship in 
■al and pointed out that if the 
ion were left to the public in the 
of a referendum, it would fail 
lse of lack of public support. 




Hariette Underhill, in the N. Y. Tribune, took occasion to pay a high 
tribute to the playing of William Collier, Jr., in "Secrets of Paris," the 
C. C. Burr release that is now playing to exceptionally big business all 
over the country. — Advt. 



Tully in Charge 

Will- Have Supervision Over First 
National Production Activities 
In California 
One of the matters under discus- 
sion at the recent executive com- 
mittee meeting of First National was 
the appointment of Richard Walton 
Tully as production chief on the 
west coat with the final word over 
the artistic merits of all pictures 
made there for release through the 
circuit. 

At First National yesterday there 
was no comment made on the report 
that Tully would be given this post. 
It is understood that the matter is 
now in the hands of the various 
lawyers, and that its final disposition 
is a matter of days only. 

Coast reports yesterday indicated 
that Tully and Guy Bates Post had 
come to a parting of the ways be- 
cause of Tully's failure to publicly an- 
nounce Post's financial interest in 
the various pictures in which he ap- 
peared. At Tully's office, it was 
stated that the cast had not been 
rounded out, and it was not known 
whether Post would appear in 
"Trilby." James Young will finish 
his first picture for First National 
in time to direct "Trilby." Tully 
leaves for the coast in a few weeks. 



Three Bad Spots 

Censorship Outlook in Missouri, 
Idaho and Iowa Not Encourag- 
ing — Pettijohn on Ground 

Charles C. Pettijohn, general coun- 
sel of the Hays organization left yes- 
terday for the Middle West on cen- 
sorship matters. He will pay parti- 
cular attention to the situations in 
Missouri, Idaho and Iowa where the 
outlook is far from optimistic. 

The situation in South Dakota is 
said to be satisfactory. The state of 
Washington is understood to be in 
satisfactory alignment and no trouble 
is expected there. Jack Connolly, 
Washington representative of the 
Hays organization was in town 
earlier in the week reporting on con- 
ditions in Tennessee, Arkansas and 
Texas. He is now en route to the 
South to keep watch on developments 
there. 

Seek Three Censors in Missouri 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Jefferson City, Mo. — The Com- 
mittee of Fifty's censorship bill pro- 
vides a commission of two men and 
a woman, each to be paid $3,000, and 
large retinue of employes at high 
salaries. 

Fees will be $2 for 1200 feet or less, 
and $1 for duplicates. $500 or 60 days 
in jail is the maximum for a violation. 



Exhibitors Out 

T. O. C. C. Withdraws Members 
From Arbitration Board — Con- 
sider it an Ultimatum 
Sam Moross, secretary of the T. O. 
C. C. yesterday instructed Hy Gains- 
boro, J. Jame and Sol Raizes not to 
participate in the deliberations of the 
joint arbitration board which met 
in the F. I. L. M. Club rooms yester- 
day. Moross delivered a letter to 
the F. I. L. M. Club members in 
which he said the T. O. C. C. con- 
sidered it a breach of promise in 
view of the arrangements under which 
they have been operating since Dec. 
14, 1921. He said that the rider in- 
serted in contracts bv some members 
of the exchangemen's organization 
vested the right of arbitration in the 
F. I. L. M, Club as seen fit by that 
organization and that the T. O. C. C. 
was left out of the deliberations en- 
tirely. Moross added that so far as 
the T. O. C. C. was concerned, the 
matter ended, there. 



Loew Plans St. Louis House 

Marcus Loew expects to leave for 
St. Louis on Sunday to complete 
plans for the erection of a State 
theater there. From St. Louis it is 
reported that the theater will seat 
4400 and will be located at 8th St. and 
Washington Ave. 



Borzage Guest of First National 
Frank Borzage, who, as noted, is 
scheduled to make a series for First 
National, was the guest of honor of 
that organization at a lunch yes- 
terday at the Ritz. Arthur Jacobs, 
in charge of the Borzage productions, 
was a co-guest. Robert Lieber, presi- 
dent of First National, welcomed 
Borzage to the organization, and 
stressed the importance of good ma- 
terial and the proper selection of a 
good director. R. A. Rowland, gen- 
eral manager of First National, said 
he was as much impressed with Bor- 
zage the man as Borzage the director, 
and Borzage made a few remarks, 
admitting he could not make a speech, 
and proving it. Harry Reichenbach 
and C. L. Yearlsey also spoke and a 
letter from Clem Deneker, the fam- 
ous Pneumonia, Nevada, exhibitor, to 
Jacobs, was read to the gathering 
of editors and publishers of fan and 
trade press present. 

Immediately after the lunch Jacobs 
left for the Coast. Borzage will fol- 
low in a few days. The first Bor- 
zage production will be based on 
"Terwilliger," written several years 
ago by Tristam Tupper. The title 
will be changed for the screen 
version. 



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«/" FII>ffiOM ^^WWf^ 9 ^ AUTHORITY 

— %Eia im H ' ■ 

Vol. XXIII No. 24 Thursday, Jan. 25, 1923 Price 5 Cents 

Copyright 1923, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by VVID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 
W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00 ; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 
Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative— Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmsehau, Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
vakia ' WmzHsplatz. 

Quotations 

High Low Close Sales 

East. Kod. 97 l / 2 96^ 96^g 700 

F. P.-L. .. 86J4 84^ 84>/> 5,000 

do pfd. . 95 95 95 300 

G'wyn ... 6 l /& $y 2 6 2,000 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's .. \9% 19 19'4 2,600 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 



Harry Fields in Denver 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
a Denver — Harry Fields, who re- 
f cently joined United Artists, is here. 



1 Buys "Wonders" For England 

F. Mordaunt Hall has purchased 
, "Wonders of the Sea," the William- 
1 son sub-sea picture for the F. B. O. 
of London for English distribution. 



Luz On Way West 
Ernst Luz, general musical director 
for the Loew circuit, is enroute to 
the coast to study picture presenta- 
tions in that territory. 



Hearst Buys "The Grey Cloak" 

William Randolph Hearst has 
purchased film rights to "The Grey 
Cloak" by Harold MacGrath from 
Jacob Wilk. 






tusXJLA-s 



SIMPLEX TITLE SHOP 

220 W. 42nd St. 
Announces the closing of a contract 
giving it exclusive sales rights on the 

FAMOUS STONE LIBRARY 
Over two million feet of selected shots 
as far back as 1897, negative and posi- 
tive, are now made available for your 
requirements. 

Phone Bryant 0984-0985 



Among The "Independents" 



Nelson Named Manager 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Minneapolis — E. P. Nelson has 
been made manager of advertising 
and publicity for F. & R. Film. 



Receiver's Sale 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Chicago — The assets of the Better 
Pictures Corp. were recently auc- 
tioned off at a receiver's sale held 
at the studio on N. Wells Street. 



Zierler Buys Burr Feature 

Sam Zierler, of Commonwealth, 
has purchased "Secrets of Paris" for 
Greater New York, and Northern 
Jersey. William Vogel has pur- 
chased the foreign rights. 



Plan Six Reeler in Texas 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
San Antonio, Tex. — Shamrock 
Photoplays, with studios at Terrell 
Wells, will produce a six-reel feature 
"The Germ." 



Third Robbins Film Finished 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Hollywood — "The Front Page 
Story," the third Jess Robbins pro- 
duction has been finished and was 
given a pre-view recently before the 
Screen Writers' Club. 



Ford Serial for Arrow 

When W. E. Shallenberger was on 
the coast he arranged for Francis 
Ford to produce a 15 episode serial 
for Arrow. 



Acquire Hart Films For Nebraska 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Omaha — The Crescent Film Ex- 
change have purchased the new series 
of Neal Hart productions for this 
territory. 



Get Michigan Rights 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Detroit — Jack Moss has taken over 
the Michigan rights to "Ten Nights 
In a Barroom," formerly held by Joe 
Horowitz. 



Enterprise Get Hart Features 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

St. Louis — Enterprise has secured 
Southern Illinois and Eastern Mis- 
souri rights to six Willam S. Hart 
re-issues that will appear under new 
titles and with new paper. 



New Goldwyn Office 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Milwaukee — Goldwyn will open a 
new branch office here about Feb. 
1st. This marks the fourth new 
Goldwyn exchange to be opened 
since Sept. 1st. 



DISTRIBUTION UPON 
A GUARANTEED BASIS 
—PLUS 

is offered to renowned 
Stars, Directors and 
Independent Producers. 

BAUMANN DISTRIBUTING CO. 

under the supervision of CH AS. O. BAUMANN, origin- 
ator and organizer of: — Kessel-Bauman, New York 
Motion, Keystone, Sales Co., Universal and Triangle 
Film Companies; producers of Ince-Kay Bee, Sennett- 
Chaplin-Keystone and other Famous Productions. 



130 W. 46th St., New York City 
Telephone Bryant 4200 



■ »'■' ■ ■ i — <% 

Thursday, January 25, 1923 



m 



iiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiii 



"Roxy" Sails on the 30th 
S. L. Rothafel leaves for Europe 
on the 30th. Sailing on the Beren- 
garia. 



FILM EXCHANGE EXECUTIVE 

Who has made an exhaustive study of the 
Executive Duties pertaining to the manage- 
ment of Branch Exchanges and Sales Man- 
agement and who has spent Twenty-four 
Years in the Theatrical Profession in Amer- 
ica and Countries abroad, desires to make a 
connection with a reputable organization that 
can use his services. Experience covers 
branch management, publicity, sales and ex- 
ploitation. First class credentials. Personal 
interview by appointment. Reply 



A B-3, 


care Film Daily 
















CHR0M0S TRADING CO. 

1123 Broadway 



Suite 616 



'Phone Chelfea 8284 



Ready | 
Money I 

WHEN YOU I 
NEED IT I 

REPUTABLE 
PROPOSITIONS 
FINANCED. 
IN ANY 
AMOUNT. 

Specialized Service 
to Motion Picture 
Enterprises. 

Quick Action. 

Consult with us in 
Confidence. 



THE 



t, January 25, 1923 




>yright Change 

Continued from Pige 1) 
\ new draft has been made 
copyright law with such 
s would permit of admission 
ternational Copyright Union 
lg transmitted to the author- 
Berne for consideration. A 

the proposed amendments 
sting law has been embodied 

shortly to be presented to 
iches of Congress. 
ithors' League has submitted 
nadian Authors' Association 
ipt of these changes, 
consistency in the existing 
leen the topic for discussion 
)d many years and has re- 
proper adjustment before 
;o an agreement on copy- 
rs existing throughout the 
d it is hoped that the pres- 
cript will unify the entire 

so that an international un- 
ng will be arrived at in the 
»n of copyrights, which will 

a great deal of criticism. 



Itart Lardner Series 

ial to THE FILM DAILY) 

lgeles— Lee Moran and Ar- 
xom have started work on 
of Ring Lardner stories in 
form. Release will probably 
jh Educational. 

tn "Archie" Comedies 
rchie Comedies, Inc.. have 
ned to produce a series of 
eel comedies, to be known 
"Indiscretions of Archie," 
the stories by P. G. Wode- 
'roduction in New York. 



Tom Moore in Nigh Film 

Tom Moore will probably appear 
in William Nigh's second picture for 
Weber and North. The title is "Mar- 
riage and Morals." 



"Dangerous Age" at Strand 

"The Dangerous Age" will be the 
feature at the Strand next week and 
not "The Voices from the Minaret," 
as stated in Monday's issue. 



DeCordoba Signed 

Through Jess Smith, Pedro De 
Cordoba has been signed to appear 
in "Fires of Faith," to be made by 
Gaumont in England, with Tom 
Terriss directing. De Cordoba will 
sail Saturday on the Celtic with Nigel 
Barrie who will also appear in the 
picture. 




Reproductive quality enables the sensitive 
emulsion to correctly portray every step of 
gradation from highest light to deepest 
shadow. 



EASTMAN 
POSITIVE FILM 

faithfully reproduces every tone of the 
negative. It carries the quality through 
to the screen. 



Eastman Film, both regular and tinted base — 
now available in nine colors, is identified through- 
out its length by the words "Eastman" "Kodak" 
stenciled in black letters in the transparent margin. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



ftars 'Stars! Stars! 




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DAILY 



Thursday, January 25, 192 



Likes Clem 

My Dear Danny: 

I have read the "daily" ever 
since it has been issued for its 
news value and the reviews be- 
cause I ought to. But if the 
whole publication hadn't con- 
tained a thing of value it would 
be worth many times its price 
for the many good laughs I 
have had out of Clem Deneker. 
I have just finished reading his 
speech aloud to Daddy and the 
tears actually rolled down his 
cheeks. Seriously Boy, in these 
days of poor business and other 
worries, your little bits of sun- 
shine come direct from heaven. 

With best regards. 

JULIAN BRYLAWSKI. 



Grauman's "Met." Opens 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Sid Grauman's Met- 
ropolitan will open tomorrow night. 



Sennett-Lesser Suit Settled 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — The suit filed by 
Mack Sennett against Sol Lesser 
some time ago for an accounting of 
the receipts of "Yankee Doodle in 
Berlin" has been settled. Up to the 
time the action was filed, Sennett 
claimed he had received $123,000 and 
that other sums were due him for 
which no account had been made. 



Taisho Buys Metro for Japan 
The Taisho Film Co. has purchased 
the entire 1922 Metro output for 
Japan. This includes "Trifling 
Women," the Mae Murray series and 
the others. 



With West Coast Theaters 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Clem Pope and 

Charles A. Goss have been added to 

the staff of the West Coast Theaters. 



Frank Drew To England 

Frank Drew, manager of the Pitts- 
burgh Fox office, sails Feb. 15 for 
London, to begin his new duties as 
assistant general manager in the 
British Isles for Fox. 



Many at "Christian" Showing 
There were a number of important 
exhibitors at the special showing of 
"The Christian" at the Capitol on 
Tuesday. Some comment was caused 
by the presence of so many exhibitors 
at such an early showing which start- 
ed at 10:15. 



Censors Collected $154,655 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Albany, N. Y— The Motion Picture 
Commission collected $154,655 from 
the industry during 1922. Its ex- 
penses were $82,883. The commis- 
sion during the year ordered elimina- 
tions from 861 films; approved 2506 
without cuts; granted permits without 
examination to 326; issued 3,377 licen- 
ses and condemned 72 in their en- 
tirety. The report says the commis- 
sion has been liberal in its judgment 
of pictures. 



McFarland Sails For "Doug" 
R. W. McFarland, formerly produc- 
tion managir for Mayflower, has been 
appointed personal foreign representa- 
tive for Douglas Fairbanks. He will 
sail Saturday for London to supervise 
the road-showing of "Robin Hood" 
on the British Isles, with head- 
quarters at the London Allied Artists' 
office. Clarence Erickson, who has 
been handling; the Fairbanks interest 
abroad, will return so i to the 
Hollywood studio to become assistant 
to John Fairbanks. 




Box-Office Title- 
Sensation — 
Thrills— 

Malcom Strauss' 

SALOME 

Nozv ready for 

INDEPENDENT 
EXCHANGES 



Distributed by 

GEORGE H. WILEY 

Incorporated 

220 W. 42nd St., N. Y. C. 



Jfjtrutnrc OJtfrporaitrr 

RESOURCES - $5,000,000 

Knickerbocker Building 
Broadway at 42nd Street, N. T. Cltj 



TITLE 



NEGATIVE 
POSITIVE 
Incl. CARDS 

15 CENTS PER FOOT 

24 Hour Service if necesi 

SIMPLEX TITLE SH0 

220 W. 42d Street Bryant 



WB ARE READ}/ TO PA\ 



FOR PRODUCTIONS OF MERI 

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^NORTHERN NEWJERS 



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729 SEVENTH AVE. Phone BRyANT f, 



independent: 
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BELIEVE IN SIGNS? 



THIS TRADE MARK MERITS 



INDEPENDENT 
- PICTURES 1 




POLICY 

Independent Pictures Corporation is committed to the 
policy of straight-from-the-shoulder methods... We have elim- 
inated the well known practice of having an "asking price," a 
"bartering price" and a "taking price." 

We are merchandising film productions under the same 
business policies and principles which prevail in other stable 
industries. 

The triangle which we have adopted for our Trade Mark 
is symbolical in that its three points represent the Producer, 
the Distributor and the Independent buyer in the field. 

Our pricing policy absolutely guarantees each a square 
deal and an equitable share in the profits of this business of 
marketing film in which each must be recognized as equally 
important factors. 




YOUR IMPLICIT CONFIDENCE 



PRODUCT 

We are offering Independent buyers: 

Twelve completed feature productions of which "Flames 
of Passion" is the first to be released. Read the reviews on 
this picture. We'll stand pat on their verdict. 

A series of big special productions, the first of which it 
now in the initial stages of production. 

Twelve smashing Nick Carter thrillers. 

Twelve D. W. Griffith Revivals starring such renowned 
artists as Lillian Gish, Blanche Sweet, Mae Marsh, Henry 
Walthall, Jack Pickford and Harry Carey. 

Additional product will be announced in the near future. 

Bear in mind that Independent Pictures Corporation will 
strictly adhere to its policy of a fair, definite price; terms of 
a most satisfactory character; always a square deal. 




Tie In With Us Now For Present and Future Profit 
INDEPENDENT PICTURES CORPORATION 

Jesse J. Goldburg, President 

1540 Broadway 

New York, N. Y. 




tie BRADSTREET 
*f FILMDOM 





2fcRECOGMIZE* 

Authority 




[. XXIII No. 25 



Friday, January 26, 1923 



Price 5 Cent* 



Looks Like Scrap 

[. L. M. Club Insists on Rider — 
xhibitors Say They Won't Book 
From Exchanges 

here were a great many informal 
ferences held yesterday in front 
he Godfrey Bldg. relative to the 
arent deadlock between the T. O. 
C. and the F. I. L. M. Club over 
matter of arbitration. 
Lt the F. I. L. M. Club meeting 
Wednesday night ,it was decided 
nsist that every exchange belong- 
to the club — and this includes all 
United Artists — attach the rider 
ting the right of arbitration in the 
>'s committee and reject all con- 
:ts unless the exhibitor agreed to 
t method of settling whatever dis- 
es may arise between exchange 

exhibitor, 
'he exchangemen base their insist- 
e on the rider clause on what they 
n the arbitrary actions of the ex- 
itors themselves who had promised 
make good what ever defaults in 
tracts and payments occurred on 
part of various of their members, 
was held that payments in some 
es had not been made as per the 
eement and that the T. O. C. C. 
not make any effort to make good, 
vas also stated that the T. O. C. C. 
1 promised to insure exchanges 
inst loss and that on that basis, 
exchanges had done away with 
deposit system. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



John Fairbanks 111 

tennis O'Brien was advised from 
I coast yesterday that John Fair- 
>,lcs, Doug's brother suffered a 
ulytic stroke on Wednesday which 
; affected his vocal chords. Doc- 
)■ state that he will recover. 


Wells Suing Sennett 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
3s Angeles — Linton Wells, form- 
r epresentative of the N. E. A. is 
a g Mack Sennett for $10,000 al- 
ii d to be due him in the form of 
r its from the "Suzanna" book and 
iure which Wells claims he wrote 
'i out getting credit. 



Unger Succeeds Zierler 

Je Unger of First National was 
jejed president of the F. I. L. M. 
3\ to succeed Sam Zierler at Wed- 
etiy's meeting. Zierler resigned, 
lljrlerman of Universal replaced 
Jr ;r as secretary and Si Fabian, as 
ic oresident succeeding Henry 



Advises Price Gut 

Carl Laemmle Thinks Admissions 

Too High — Cites Instance of 

of Detroit House 

Carl Laemmle, in a statement 
which he predicts will cause a storm 
of criticism, suggests that exhibitors 
try a cut in admissions as a stimulant 
for business. Here are his reasons: 

"The Central, in Detroit, has mul- 
tiplied its attendance by foxir through 
cutting its admission price in half. 
Formerly the admission price was 
twenty cents. It was cut to ten 
cents. Immediately four times as 
many customers entered the theater. 

"This may be the thing lor every ex- 
hibitor to do. and it may not be. I don't 
pretend to know the individual problems of 
every exhibitor, but one thing I do know, 
that is that the exhibitor who is losing 
money or who is not making what he should, 
must hop to it and do something radical in 
order to improve his business. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Fire at Fine Arts Plant 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — A fire at the Fine 

Arts plant caused damage of $50,000. 

Chester Bennett's studio property 

suffered the loss. 



Feinman in Detroit 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Detroit — Al Feinman is here in 

connection with the campaign for 

"Heroes of the Street" which opens 

at the Madison on Sunday. 



Big Deal Put Through 
On Coast By Lesser 

Secures T. & D. Houses and Franchise in First National — Be- 
comes One of Most Important Factors in Exhibiting 
Field — Heavily Interested in Production 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

San Francisco — Sol Lesser and Abe Gore, representing West 
Coast Theaters, Inc., have bought out all of the Turner and 
Dahnken holdings in Northern and Southern California as well 
as the First National franchise in this region and in New York 
State. 

The deal also includes the Educational franchise and is said 
to involve about $3,000,000. 



Metro to Release "Success" 

Metro will release Murray Gars- 
son's "Success" on March 26. The 
deal was closed yesterday by Charles 
R. Rogers representing the producer. 



Mary Minter Through 
The Associated Press reports the 
Los Angeles Times quoting Mary 
Miles Minter as "through" with films, 
now that her Paramount contract has 
expired. 




"Tell us, what have you done to him?" This incident in Maurice Tourn- 
eur's production featuring Lon Chaney, "While Paris Sleeps, marks the 
beginning of as exciting a climax as have ever been filmed, 
kinson picture is a real thriller. — Advt. 



This Hod- 



This will give Lesser and his as- 
sociates 20 per cent interest in First 
National, and makes him the owner 
of probably the largest individual 
holding in the organization. 

This will also give the West Coast 
Theaters, Inc., practically control of 
California, with about 150 days book- 
ing, including first runs in all im- 
portant cities in North and South 
California. 

Lesser, who has been active in 
producing, is expected to continue in 
that field as well. The deal, how- 
ever, makes him powerful as an ex- 
hibitor, comparing with Loew and 
Famous Players. The difference is 
that he is local in operations, his 
territory covering about 1,000 miles 
along the California coast. 






Irving M. Lesser stated yesterday 
that the acquisition of the T. and 
D. holdings by Lesser, Gore Bros, 
and Adolph Ramish, involves nine 
Northern California theaters: each 
known as the T. and D., and located 
in Oakland, Berkeley, Richmond, 
Watsonville, Salinas, Stockton, Sac- 
ramento and San Jose, and also the 
Tivoli in San Francisco; the First 
National franchise in Northern Cali- 
fornia, which gives West Coast con- 
trol over California, Nevada, Ari- 
zona and the Hawaii's; the Educa- 
tional franchise in the same territory 
and the control of the Turner, Dahn- 
ken and Langley circuit in Southern 
California, in which West Coast has 
been interested. This chain includes 
five theaters in Los Angeles, three 
in Pasadena, two in Glendale and 
one each in Huntington Park, Taft 
and several other towns. There are 

14 all told. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



•fra i t? Jif .Mmemwrn t 



THE 






DAILY 



Friday, January 26, 1923 

■■iflfawii 




11 Vol. XXIII No. 'v5 Friday, Jan. 26. "923 Prices Cents 

H - 

if Copyright l"2.i, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
J Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St.. 
1 , New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
3. FILM FOLKS, INC. 

i." Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor; 
4l J W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Mali- 
gn »ger ; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
_ Ectered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
"' at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
°t the act of March 3, 1879. 
lb Terma (Postage free) United States. Outside 
;", of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
1 months, $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
r $15.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
u- Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
1 Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
t. 6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 

1603. 
1 Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 
3; Wabash Ave. 

i, London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
l= Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 
.. Clichy. . 

Central European Representative — Interna- 
6 tionale Filmschau, Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
vakia). Wenzelsplatz. 

Quotations 

i) High Low Close Sales 

' East. Kod. 96 J* 96^ 96^4 100 

)■ F. P.-L. .. 85-4 84J4 85 600 

\ do pfd Not quoted 

Fi G'wyn Not quoted 

Griffith Not quoted 

t Loew's .. 1954 18*6 19J4 1.200 

t Triangle Not quoted 

t World Not quoted 

Incorporations 

i Dover, Del. — Diamond States The- 
ater Co. Capital, $100,000. Incor- 
porators, James M. Satterfield. 

Albany — Fort Edward Amus. Co., 
Fort Edward. Capitol $10,000. In- 
corporators, L. and M. Fischer and 
W. Bascom. Attorney, N. Bascom. 

Dover, Del. — Herald Non-The- 
atrical Pictures. Capital, $5,000,000. 
Incorporators, Graham Paterson, Rae 
D. Henkle and Clarence C. Chester, 
New York. (Capital Trust Co. of 
Dela). 






ztwue^ 



KLUTHO STUDIO IN FLORIDA 
FOR SALE 

Cooper-Hewitts hard lights and 
laboratory located on valuable 
ground in heart of city. Cost 
§65,000. Will sell at a sacrifice. 
Reasonable amount in cash bal- 
ance on time. 

Will be dismantled in 30 days if not sold 
H. J. Klutho, Owner 

Room 401 St. James Building 
Jacksonville, Florida. 

No coal needed, no snow and ice. 

Cheapest electric juice in the 

Country only 2 cents a kilowatt. 



Coast Brevities 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Hollywood — "The Cheat" will go 
into production the latter part of this 
week. 



Huntley Gordon plays the leading 
male role in "Chastity." 



Frankie Lee's contract with Pop- 
ular Pictures has terminated. 



Paul N. Wilson has been engaged 
to edit and title "Nobody's Bride." 



Hazel Deane has been engaged to 
appear in Christie Comedies. 



Mr. and Mrs. Carter DeHaven have 
started work on "Say It With Dia- 
monds," their ninth for F. B. O. 



Mae Busch, who recently signed 
a five-year contract with Goldwyn. 
plays an important role in "Souls for 
Sale." 



Rex Ingram will begin work on 
"Scaramouche," immediately upon 
his arrival here from New York, 
Feb. 1st. 

H. E. GAUSMAN. 



Looks Like Scrap 

(Continued from Page 1) 
On the other hand, members of the 
T. O. C. C. made statements about 
the high-handed actions of the F. I. L. 
M. Club and stated they would have 
nothing to do with the exchanges. 
It was said for them that most ex- 
hibitors had booked up product for 
two months ahead and could afford 
to stop business with exchanges until 
"they saw the light of reason." The 
exhibitor opinion also seemed to be 
that one or two weeks without any 
new business would bring about a de- 
cided change in the attitude of the 
distributors. 



Tom Moore Here 

Tom Moore of Washington is in 
town. 



Build Big Set in Brooklyn 

What is said to be the largest in- 
terior ever built for a picture now 
stands in the 23rd Regiment armory 
in Brooklyn for "Little Old New 
York." It is about 250 ft. in depth. 
Marion Davies will entertain at lunch 
today after which newspaper folks 
will witness the shooting of some 
scenes. 



The picture is as good as the title! 



And the title is 



"LOVE'S OLD SWEET SONG" 

which has been known in every American home for generations. 



A Lund Production, with Louis Wolheim, Helen Lowell, 
Donald Gallaher and Helen Weir in the cast. 



NORCA PICTURES, Inc. 1540 Broadway, N. Y. City 



Control Five St. Louis Houses 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

St. Louis — Lehr Brothers have 
bought the interest of Morris Reich- 
man in the Palace, and several South 
Side houses. Lehr brothers now 
control the Family, New Broadway, 
Peerless, Yale and Palace. 



Ready j 

M ONEY 

WHEN YOU 
NEED IT 

REPUTABLE 
PROPOSITIONS 
FINANCED 
IN ANY 
AMOUNT. 

Specialized Service 
to Motion Picture 
Enterprises. 

Quick Action. 

Consult with us in 
Confidence, 

CHROMOS TRADING CO. 

1123 Broadway 



Suite 616 



'Phone Chelsea 8284 



More Golden Facts About — 

"THE HERO" 

A Gasnier Production 

From the Atlantic to the Pacific, from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of 
Mexico, all wise showmen are booking it for early play dates. Latest 
returns are: 



Boston Theatre 

Phillips Egypt 

Rialto 

U. S. Theatre 

Des Moines Theatre 



Boston 

Fort Worth, Tex. 
San Antonio, Tex. 
Paterson, N. J. 
Des Moines, la. 

Here is a great story of heroism in every-day life. 



PREFERRED 
PICTURESInc. 



Distributed by 

AL-LICHTMAN 

CORPO F IATIO N 

l6508ROADWAv(>jSff)NEW YORK CTTV 



riday, January 26, 1923 

1 i inrrfTr"-"- 1 "*™" 




DAILY 



Lesser Deal 

(Continued from Page 1) 

/est Coast now operates 57 houses 
its own chain, and by the new 
[ increases its holdings to 80. 
>ut $1,000,000 in San Francisco 

estate is part of the deal, this 
uding a large plot of ground in 
k of the California theater, 
he New York State franchise in 
it National is also part of the 
isaction. Lesser and his associ- 
i own 80 per cent of this franchise, 
ing Lesser stated yesterday that 
iid not contemplate any change in 
lagement, although Ralph Clark, 

general manager will, in the 
ire, work under supervision of 
ser. 

Robert Lieber's Comment 
Lobert Lieber, president of As- 
iated First National, said, 
tt is of course particularly gratifying to 
r fellow franchise holders that the Tur- 
and Dahnken interests have been taken 
■ by members of our own organization. 
;srs. Lesser, Gore and Ramish have won 
universal respect and admiration of the 
e because of the sound, yet rapid prog- 

they have made. It seems to me that 
more striking indication of confidence 
the future of Associated First National 
Id be given than this additional and very 
it investment these men have made in the 
lpany. Having lVen intimately asso- 
ed with the organization for so long, 
i would hardly have increased their al- 
ly heavy holdings in First National un- 

they believed in its future. The deal 
| be regarded as of very great import- 
e to us because of the solidarity and 
iter unity of action it will bring about, 
ch would not have been true had alien 
rests bought into the company." 



Kansas City Notes 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Kansas City, Mo. — Lew Nathanson 
has been added to the selling force 
of F. B. O. 



Bill Branch has been given charge 
of Goldwyn exploitation in the 
vicinity of Omaha and St. Louis. 



E. C. Rhoden, First Nat'l branch 
manager, has fully recuperated from 
an operation for appendicitis. 



Plan Ten More 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
^os Angeles — West Coast Theaters 



Al Kahn, Crescent Film Exchange 
has secured rights to "Nan of the 
North." 



The Linwood has been reopened 
here after undergoing extensive re- 
modeling. 



The Capitol Enterprise Co. has 
filed papers of incorporation here 
with capital listed at $1,000,000. 
They operate several houses in the 
city. 



Friedman Coming to New York 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Detroit — Joe Friedman, Universal 
manager here will be transferred to 
New York shortly where he will have 
duties in connection with the new 
sales cabinet in the home office. 



Inc. will add ten theaters to their 
chain, according to present plans. 
Three, in San Pedro, Pomona and 
Riverside are in variuos stages of 
construction while sites are being 
secured for seven more in other 
Southern California towns. 



Advises Price Gut 

(Continued from Page 1) 
"The Detroit theater mentioned is a house 
of 551 seats. During a ten weeks period 
a year ago, it was doing about $450 a week 
at an admission of twenty cents. During 
a similar period recently it ran its business 
up to $900 a week with a ten cents admis- 
sion price. In other words, cutting the 
price in half, doubled the gross receipts and 
attracted four times as many patrons. 

"I know of another theater which in- 
creased its business $300 a week by cutting 
its admission prices, and of others which 
built up better business by similar means, I 
am not at liberty to give out the names of 
these houses. It is of particular note that the 
patrons who formerly were regular attendants 
at these houses before prices went up sev- 
eral years ago, and who dropped out with 
the price boost, have made their re-appear- 
ance as steady customers with the price re- 
duction. 



"Cordelia The Magnificent" Next 
"Cordelia the Magnificent," by Le- 
roy Scott, will be Clara Kimball 
Young's next vehicle for Metro. 



Creditors Meet Jan. 29 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Jersey City, N. J. — Creditors of C. 
C. Pictures, Inc., will meet in 
Newark on Jan. 29. Nathaniel S. 
Corwin, of New York has been ap- 
pointed ancillary receiver, and James 
A. Hamill of Jersey City, receiver. 
C. C. Pictures, formerly operated as 
Chaplin Classics, Inc., and is the 
successor of the Clark Cornelius 
Corp. 




ART TITLES 

LOUIS MEYER 

Crafts: len Film Lab. 
251 Wert 19th St. 
Watkina 7260-7461 



International . Distributers of 
MOTION 'PICTURES 



»V tvH 



Inter-Ocean Film Corporation' 



I NTER-OCEAN BUILDING 

218 WEST 42nd .ST;',' •' '■ NtW $£)$£ 

BRYANT 7812 \ 

WHEN YOO THINK 3? 
FOREIGN ^THINK', QF.. ; " 



SIMPLEX TITLE SHOP 

220 W. 42nd St. 
Announces the closing of a contract 
giving it exclusive sales rights on the 

FAMOUS STONE LIBRARY 
Over two million feet of selected shots 
as far back as 1897, negative and posi- 
tive, are now made available for your 
requirements. 

Phone Bryant 0984-0985 




[ AT THE FOLLOWING THEATRES 

'anniversary first national week 



I? 



FEBRUARY 3-10 



°t 

IS 

U 



1 

t- 
1 

II 

J- 
V> 

r\ 



THEATRE CITY 

Des Moines Des Moines, la. 

Capitol Davenport la. 

Pastime t . Iowa City, la. 

Allen St. Catharines, Can. 

Allen Kingston, Ont. 

Capitol ... . w . Springfield, Mass. 

Olympia Worcester, Mass. 

Olympia Boston, Mass. 

Capitol Allston, Mass. 

Exeter St Boston, Mass. 

Olympia Brockton, Mass. 

New Grand Central St. Louis, Mo. 

West End Lyric St. Louis, Mo. 

Capitol St. Louis, Mo. 

Beaux Arts Palm Beach, Fla. 

Arcade Jacksonville, Fla. 

Metropolitan Atlanta, Ga. 

Trianon Birmingham, Ala. 

Criterion Macon, Ga. 

Beachams Orlando. Fla. 

Capitol Ansonia, Conn. 

Empress Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Rialto Tulsa, Okla. 

Murray Lawton, Okla. 

Olympia New Haven, Conn. 

Melba Dallas, Tex. 

Rialto San Antonio, Tex. 

Isis Houston, Tex. 

Murray Ponca City, Okla. 

Odeon Bartlesville, Okla. 

Regent Elmira, N. Y. 

Strand Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Strand Syracuse, N. Y. 

Shea's Hippodrome Buffalo, N. Y. 

Shea's North Park Buffalo, N. Y. 

Shea's Court Street Buffalo, N. Y. 

Eastman Rochester, N. Y. 

Orpheum L South Bend, Ind. 

Luna Logansport, Ind. 

Royal Danville, Ind. 

Princess Whiting, Ind. 

Liberty _. Portland, Ore. 



THEATRE CITY 

America Casper, Wyo. 

Poli Meriden, Conn. 

Colonial Columbus, Ohio 

Walnut Cincinnati, Ohio 

Sigma Lima, Ohio 

Broadway Charlotte, N. C. 

Broadway Winston-Salem, N. C. 

National Greensboro, N. C. 

Strand Emporia, Kans. 

Electric Joplin, Mo. 

Palace Wichita, Kans. 

Electric Springfield, Mo. 

Newman Kansas City, Mo. 

Electric St. Joseph, Mo. 

Isis Augusta, Kans. 

Mary Anderson Louisville, Ky. 

Rivoli Winchester, Tenn. 

P. & A Plymouth, Mich. 

University Norman, Okla. 

Judith Lewiston, Mont. 

Babcock Billings, Mont. 

Branford Newark, N. J. 

Regent Paterson, N. J. 

Pastime Union Hill, N. J. 

National Jersey City, N. J. 

Monticello Jersey City, N. J. 

Strand Lakewood, N. J. 

Allen ,. . .^ Windsor, Canada 

Shea's Hippodrome Toronto, Canada 

Alhambra Omaha, Neb. 

Lyric Lincoln, Neb. 

Illinois La Grange, 111. 

Gaiety Springfield, 111. 

Majestic Spring Valley, 111. 

Majestic Bloomington, 111. 

Rialto ^ Aurora, 111. 

Hinsdale Hinsdale, 111. 

Plumo Streator, 111. 

Midway Rockford, 111. 

Rivieria Chicago, 111. 

Tivoli Chicago, 111. 

Grand Wheaton, 111. 



Joseph M. Schenck presents 



NORMA TALMADGE 



IN 



"The Voice from the Minaret" 




Personally Directed by Frank Lloyd 

Adapted by Frances Marion from the novel by Robert Hich- 
ens; Photographed by Antonio Gaudio and Norbert Brodin 

A 3tr>5t national Picture 






1 FIRST 
NATIONAL 



(THE 

ie BRADSTREET 
/FH-MDOM 





ZfoRECOCMIZEt 

Authority 




XXIII No. 26 



Saturday, January 27, 1923 



Price 5 Cents 



dore For Allied 

aurice Prod, and "Potash and 
srlmutter" Series May Go 
Through Abrams 
Organization 

j understood that a deal is now 
way whereby the Allied Pro- 
i and Distributors Corp. — the 
i Artists subsidiary — may re- 
the George Fitzmaurice Prod, 
he "Potash and Perlmutter" 
to be produced by Samuel 
ryn. 

imaurice starts work under his 
?yn arrangement as soon as he 
etes "The Cheat," his last pro- 
n for Paramount, 
am Abrams admitted yesterday 
le was talking with Goldwyn. 
Ided- 

believe a number of other dis- 
ors have been discussing the 
r with Mr. Goldwyn, too. I 
e that Fitzniaurice is one of the 
:st directors in America and I 
that exhibitors can make 
f with his productions. We 
be very glad indeed to dis- 
e his pictures." 

i Goldwyn could not be reached 
day. 

Rothacker Re-elected 
Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
cago — Watterson R. Rothacker 
e-elected president of the Roth- 
Film Mfg. Co. at the annual 
ng. Other officers are H. J. 
is, vice-president; Charles E. 
Jr., treasurer; John G. Hahn, 
ary; Edward H. Seifert, as- 
t secretary and J. G. Mam- 
•, assistant treasurer. These 
ler with Douglas D. Rothacker 
itute the board of directors. 



Seeing New York 

By Clem Deneker 
nager of the Deneker Circuit 

11, I've seen the Capitol theater 
must say that the more I go 
d this town, the more I'm dis- 
nted. I expected to see differ- 
nd of pictures at the Capitol and 
I seen a picture there, that was 
he same on the screen, as the 
I show, well, I was all ready to 
the choo choo for Pneumonia. 
; only difference between them 
line is that there wasn't so much 
r to these — but they was just 
lg pictures just the same. 
. Rothafel was great to me. We 
and discussed the exhibitors 
les from every angle and he 
5 to have the same complaints I 
only he gets them right here 
e they start while I got to wait 
:hey work their way out to 

(Continued on Page 3) A 



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"Secrets of Paris," the screen version of Eugene Sue's masterpiece, has 
registered the biggest hit of any independent release presented in many, 
many months. Cast, story, production, all have been highly endorsed by 
criticis, exhibitors and public. — Advt 



Four More to Go 

Roach Denies Report That He Would 
Release Through Ritz Carlton 
Pictures 
Hal Roach, producer of the Harold 
Lloyd comedies, who is in New 
York, stated yesterday that there 
was no truth to the published report 
that when Lloyd finished his Pathe 
contract he would release through 
Ritz Carlton Pictures, J. E. Wil- 
liams' new organization. Roach said 
future plans had not been made, in- 
asmuch as Lloyd had four more 
to make for Pathe. 



Fairbanks on Hays 

The Associated Press, reprinting an 
interview from the Los Angeles 
Times yesterday quoted Douglas 
Fairbanks as follows: 

"Mr. Hays has nothing whatever to do 
with the art or morals of the motion picture 
industry. He is simply the hired intermediary 
or 'fixer.' He has done wonderful work in 
straightening out the censorship tangle, but 
that, and only that, is his function. 

"When Mr. Hays was here last month I 
told him the public ought to be informed that 
•moral uplift' was not his role. I admire his 
ability and admire him as a man, but I 
believe his true status should be made known." 



Goldwyn-Seastrom 

Noted Swedish Director-Producer- 
Actor to Work in America 
For Goldwyn 
Victor Seastrom. whose produc- 
tions for the Swedish Biograph have 
attracted unusual and marked atten- 
tion during the past few years, and 
who is regarded by important Ameri- 
can producers as one of the finest 
directors of the day, was signed yes- 
terday by F. J. Godsol to produce for 
Goldwyn Pictures. He will leave for 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Lund Plans Films in Color 
Oscar Lund has formed Lund 
Prod., Inc., and will make a feature 
in natural colors as his first produc- 
tion. 



The Hays office refused to com- 
ment on this yesterday. 



"The Spoilers" for Goldwyn 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — It was reported yes- 
terday that Jesse D. Hampton, who 
has not been active in pictures for 
some time, would resume production 
activities with a new version of 
"The Spoilers," and that Goldwyn 
would distribute. 



No comment was made at Gold- 
.vyn on the above yesterday. 



Deal Causes Unrest 

Undercurrent of Dissatisfaction 

Among Distributors Over Pur- 
chase of T. and D. Prop- 
erties in the West 

There is a definite undercurrent of 
dissatisfaction among distributors 
over the transfer of the various Tur- 
ner and Dahnken holdings in Cali- 
fornia to the West Coast Theaters, 
Inc. The important transaction was 
discussed in many offices yesterday. 
One angle of the discussion was this: 

What effect will the consolidation 
have on future prices? 

Before the deal was consummated, 
West Coast controlled about 100 days 
along the Pacific Slope. There have 
been conferences at various times be- 
tween officials of the theater circuit 
and heads of important distributing 
organizations regarding the prices 
paid by the circuit and, at the last 
held not so long ago, it was reported 
that the entire matter had been set- 
tled satisfactorily. 

Although it is true that West Coast 
Theaters do not control the first run 
situation in Los Angeles and San 
Francisco, the fact that their total 
bookings per picture now aggregate 
about 150 days will, it is believed, 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Hudson Going to Coast 
Earl J. Hudson of First National, 
is expected to leave for Los Angeles 
shortly in advance of Richard A. 
Rowland. Hudson stated yesterday 
the report was somewhat exaggerated 
and that he didn't plan the trip "at 
present." 



Claims and Denials 

Exhibitors and Exchangemen Can't ' 
Agree on Situation of Rider , 

Clause in Local Contracts 

Claims evidently originating in ex- t 
hibitor circles that the Hays office r 
had stepped into the local fight 5 
through its law committee, and had c 
instructed exchanges who were mem- 
bers of the F. I. L. M. Club to elimin- 
ate the rider clause until some action \ 
was taken on the uniform contract 
were denied yesterday at the Hays j 
office and by officials of the F. I. L. 
M. Club. 

The original report indicated that 
the dissension between the T. O. C. 
C. and the F. I. L. M. Club had * 
been removed by the action of the 
exchanges in doing away with the 
rider vesting arbitration in the ex- 
changemen's organization. The Hays 3 
office denied the report unqualifiedly D 
as did the F. I. L. M. Club where it 
was reported the situation was un- 
changed. 



-1 
lb 



) 
I 

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I. 

f 








Vol. XXIII No. 26 Saturday, Jan. 27, 19?3 Price 5 Cents 

Copyright 1923, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor; 
J. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
»t the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 
Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1, 
Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau, Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
vakia), Wenzelsplatz. 

Quotations 

High Low Close Sales 

East. Kod. 96 96 96 310 

F. P.-L. . . 85 8414 84^ 300 

do pfd. . 96^4 96 96y 2 400 

G'wyn ... 6% 5% Sji 1,300 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's ... 19J4 18^ 19^ 3,300 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 



Incorporations 

Dover, Del. — Crandall's Tivoli 
Theater, Wilmington. Capital $650,- 
000. (Corporation Trust Co. of 
America.) 



Albany — Lewall Amus. Co., Ticon- 
deroga. Capital $10,000. Incorpora- 
tors, L. and M. Fischer and A. M. 
Barton. Attorney, N. Bascom. 



Albany — Amsterdam Theaters 
Realty Co., Manhattan. Capital 
$5,000. Incorporators, P. Casey, L. 
E. Thompson and A. J. Van Buren. 
Attorney, J. H. Walters. 



Albany — Brabon Tynan, Manhat- 
tan, motion pictures. Capital, $5,000. 
Incorporators, W. G. Lovatt, S. 
Schwartzman and A. Corey. Attor- 
ney H. S. Hechheimer. 



Albany — Julian Rochlitz Studios, 
Manhattan. Capital $5,000. Incor- 
porators, J. J. Meyers, S. Friedman 
and M. S. Brotman. Attorney, Hart- 
man, Sheridan & Tekulsky. 



Lasky Signs Richard Dix 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Richard Dix has 
been signed by Paramount to star. 




In the Courts 

A suit for $2,480 has been filed in 
the Supreme Court by the Powers 
Engraving Co. against Malcolm 
Strauss and Charles Presbrey for 
work, labor and services. 



The suit of Herbert Rawlinson 
against Oliver Prod., for breach of 
contract of employment has been re- 
stored to the Supreme Court calendar 
for trial on Jan. 29. It was stated 
that the case would not be defended. 



A default judgment for $1,415 has 
been filed in the City Court in favor 
of Jacob H. Meyers against the 
Clark-Cornelius Corp. on drafts 
drawn on the Cosmopolitan Film Co., 
which were endorsed to the plaintiff 
but not paid. 



A jury before Supreme Court 
Justice Platzek gave a verdict for 
$4,680 for George B. Ward in a suit 
against Patrick A. Powers, which 
with interest made a judgment for 
$5,391. Ward claimed that he was 
entitled to the possession of 312 
shares of stock of the Powers Film 
Products. Inc., worth $6,000, which 
Powers refused to deliver to him, and 
sued for that sum. 



Justice E. J. Gavegan, of the N. 
Y. Supreme Court, has signed an 
order approving a bond for $250 as 
security for cost in a proceeding 
brought by John Rounan against C. 
L. Chester, the C. L. Chester Prod., 
and the Chester Picture Corp. 

Rounan is seeking a temporary in- 
junction to restrain the Chester 
Picture Corp. from producing, leas- 
ing or distributing any prints, nega- 
tive or pictures of the chimpanzee 
known as "Snooky," either under the 
title of "The Jungle Romeo" or the 
"Blue Beard of the Jungle," or in 
any picture form. 



Los Angeles — Justice Frank S. 
Forbes has assessed Artists' Book- 
ing Exchange, through John Lan- 
caster, its general manager, costs of 
the trial in which it sued George 
Hackathorne, for $93.75, the amount 
of a commission asserted to be due 
them for obtaining a position for 
Hackathorne in "Human Hearts" in 
1921. 

According to the complaint Hacka- 
thorne entered into a verbal agree- 
ment with it to pay a commission of 
5% of his salary on any position ob- 
tained by him through the agency. 
It developed that Hackathorne pre- 
viously had signed an agreement with 
Robertson and Webb, for manage- 
ment of his affairs. When notified 
by Lancaster that a part had been 
obtained for him at Universal, the 
former was referred to Clifford 
Robertson as his agent. Subse- 
quently Robertson succeeded in ob- 
taining the part for his client. 

Lancaster claimed that he had 
never received notice from Hacka- 
thorne to the effect that he had turn- 
ed over his affairs to Robertson and 
Webb. 



McDermott Now Treasurer 

J. E. McDermott has been elected 
treasurer of Select. 



Comedy Producer Here 

Ella Kelly, producer of Kelly's 
Klean Komedies, Columbus, O., is 
at the Bristol. 



Laemmle in Los Angeles 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Carl Laemmle is 
here. When he got off the train at 
San Bernardino he was met with a 
surprise in the form of a delegation 
of local exhibitors, arranged by Mike 
Boylan. 



"Andy Gump" Series for "U" 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Universal will re- 
lease a series of "Andy Gump" two 
reelers to be produced by Samuel 
Van Ronkel. It is understood the 
contract covers a period of five years 
and was closed last November. 



F. B. O. Signs Witwer 
P. A. Powers has signed H. C. 
Witwer to write a new series of 
stories for production and has also 
secured the film rights to all stories 
that the author may write for the 
next five years, with the exception 
of those stories already contracted 
for. 



Four New Exchanges 
Second National has arranged with 
four new exchanges for the distribu- 
tion of its product. These are Strand 
Film Service, Washington; Standard 
Film Exchange, Pittsburgh; Green- 
wald-Griffith Film Exchange. Cleve- 
land and Harthill Pictures, Inc., Chi- 
cago. Dale Hanshaw is nOw on the 
road for the company. 



Want Jersey Closed Sundays 
The Society for Prevention of 
Crime and the Promotion of Morals 
intends to launch a statewide cam- 
paign to enforce the Sunday clos- 
ing law in Jersey. It will be started 
with sermons in churches throughout 
the state this Sunday and will be fol- 
lowed up along other lines as soon 
as the organization can obtain more 
funds. 



Bache Canadian District Manager 

Floyd M. Brockell has appointed 
Louis Bache, Washington branch 
manager, as district manager for First 
National in Canada. Vincent Mc- 
Cabe has resigned. 

Walter E. Lusk, as noted, is Wash- 
ington manager and G. W. Erdmann 
made manager in Cleveland. C. E. 
Bond is Chicago manager perm- 
anently. 



May Control Future Output 

Although no definite understanding 
has been reached by First National 
and Richard Walton Tully, regarding 
the latter's possible affiliation with the 
organization on production matters, 
it is true that a plan is under discus- 
sion whereby Tully will supervise 
productions to be made in the future 
under contracts yet to be executed. 
If the arrangement is made. Tully 
will not interfere in any way with 
producers now making pictures for 
the circuit. 



BWSSBBWHsaaSB! 
Saturday, January 27, 19 1 



Deal Causes Unres 

(Continued from Page 1) 
act in the future as an extrem; 
powerful lev%r in influencing distr 
utors and their prices on future p 
tures. West Coast will have, fr. 
this time on, an extremely interesti 
talking point to advance to distril 
tors in the shape of nine first nj 
in Northern California. 

Distributors refused to discuss 
coast deal yesterday for publicati. 



Late yesterday there were repo 
in circulation that the deal had i 
been definitely closed, although t 
sources from which this comrm 
originated, admitted that a trans; 
tion was under way. Irving Lesi 
stated, however, that he had receiv 
a number of confirmatory telegrai: 
from the coast and that there cot 
be no doubt about the consummati 
of the contract. 



Alterations for Tivoli, 'Frisco 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

San Francisco — The Tivoli will 
redecorated at a cost of $250,01 
The theater passes into the hands 
West Coast Theaters, Inc., by virti 
of the T. and D. deal. 



Plan Alterations at Studio 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — The Lesser prodi 
tion unit, Principal Pictures, w 
spend about $100,000 in altering t 
old Vidor studio which it has tak 
over. A new closed stage will 
constructed and additions made to t 
administration buildings. 



TITLE 



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220 W. 42nd St. 
Announces the closing of a contract 
giving it exclusive sales rights on the 

FAMOUS STONE LIBRARY 
Over two million feet of selected shots 
as far back as 1897, negative and posi- 
tive, are now made available for your 
requirements. 

Phone Bryant 0984-0985 



THE 



ay, January 27, 1923 




DAILY 

miiiiiiiMii 



.theN 



ews 



No. 9 



I OCCUPIES THE RUHR— A 
very timely and interesting scenes 
the French army entering the Ruhr; 
soldiers pouring into Essen; the 
haracter of the occupation, etc. etc. 
ws from Cary, 111.; San Diego, Cal. ; 
k; on the Mexican border; Tacoma, 
:c. 

THE FIRST NEWS REEL 
THE REAL NEWS FIRST 







day 



eing New York 

(Continued from Page 1) 

. There was lots of empty 
den I was there about 6.30 in 
moon and I ast him why he 
;t stars to make personal ap- 
es at that time to pull them 

said he would think it over, 
mind giving people ideas so 
they aint opposition to me. 
tothafel made a good sugges- 
me too, which I am going to 
i with the press agents if I 
t them together for a talk. 

the idea. To have all the 
lesmen carry make up, wigs 
ngs, and when they come to 
>nia to sell me films, they can 
p like one of the stars of their 
y and make personal appear- 
Then I can break even, even 
icture is as good as they rave 
t being, which it aint always. 

s the first idea I gets since I 

ere, and I bet Plunkett and 

:1 both use them I give them. 

another thing, I think they 

mistake putting the name of 

cture in too many places out- 

the theaters, they dont leave 

to the imagination. For in- 

suppose they are playing a 

picture, which the chances are 

f the time, they are, and it 

some town ahead of this one, 

: people in that town writes to 

iends here telling them not to 

I they lose lots of customers. 

just put out the sign "a new 

every week." then no one 

know anything about it until 

is stuck with a ticket and then 

ir worry. That's my method 

'neumonia — I guess that's why 

isiness. I'm going to the Rivoli 

nder if you can arrange for me 
it Marcus Loew. I want to 
n about blind bookings? 



Coast Brevities 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Hollywood — Gretchen Hartman has 
returned from New York. 



irst Natl's February List . 

at a Wife Learned," "Migltv 
Rose," "The Sunshine Trail," 
["he Pilgrim" are set for re- 
uring February by First Na- 



A huge radio station has been 
erected on the Warner lot. 



Work has started on Buddy Mes- 
senger's third for Century. 



Three new "gag" men have been 
engaged for Century Comedies. 



Shannon Day has left for a brief 
visit to her mother in New York. 



"The Tiger's Claw" has been fin- 
ished and is now being edited and 
titled. 



Cullen Landis is in San Diego se- 
curing some exteriors for her next 
vehicle. 



Production on "They Call It Danc- 
ing," has been temporarily post- 
poned. 



Ethel Clayto is working on "The 
Greater Glory" at the F. B. O. 
studio. 



"Merry Go Round" has been finish- 
ed and will be given a series of pre- 
views before it is released, early in 
the Spring. 



Raymond Griffith has been signed 
on a long term contract with Gold- 
wyn. He will play the part of Sheri- 
dan Scott in "The Rear Car." 



Marjorie Daw will be Douglas 
MacLean's leading lady in "Going 
Up." Lloyd Ingraham will direct for 
Associated Exhibitor release. 



Goldwyn-Seastrom I Guts and Flashes 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Hollywood next Wednesday, and it 
is anticipated that he will immediately 
start in production. Seastrom, under 
the contract signed, is understood to 
have the right to act in as well as 
direct his productions. 

For several years, various Ameri- 
can producers have sought to bring 
Seastrom to this country. It is 
known that two years ago, one of 
the most important companies made 
a serious effort to have Seastrom 
come to America, but for various rea- 
sons, the idea failed of development. 

Seastrom's latest release in Ameri- 
ca was "At The Stroke of Midnight," 
by Metro. This was produced orig- 
inally under the title of "The Death 
Wagon." Among the other produc- 
tions which Seastrom has made, and 
which have been released are: "You 
and I," "Mortal Clay," "A Man There 
Was," and others. 



The local Fox circuit has booked 
"The Third Alarm." 



F. B. O. will release "The Bishop 
of the Ozarks," a Finis Fox Prod., 
next month. 



John Colton, has been engaged to 
write the scenario for "The Ex- 
citers." 



"The Lap of Luxury," is the sec- 
ond of the Glenn Hunter series to be 
released through Hodkinson. 



Marion Davies Entertains 
Marion Davies entertained about 
SO magazine and newspaper writers 
yesterday at a luncheon given in the 
23rd Regiment Armory, Brooklyn, 
where a large set for "Little Old New 
York" had been built. 



Wittman Re-elected 
John J, Wittman has again been 
re-elected president of the Bronx M. 
P. Theater Owners' Ass'n. Other 
officers are John C. Bolte, vice- 
president; Henry Cole, secretary; 
Henry Suchman, treasurer and M. 
Ginsberg, trustee. 



S. G. Newman, who has been here 
representing the British Exhibitors 
Film, Ltd., has sailed back home. 



"The World's Applause" will be 
the feature at the Rivoli next week. 
"Nobody's Money" will be the Rialto 
feature. 



Louise Huff and Ben Lynn have 
both deserted films for the stage, 
making their debut in "Mary the 
Third." 



Robert C. Bruce, producer of 
Wilderness Tales for Educational, 
has finished editing and titling the 
first three of his next series. 



Have Your Titles 

Made the Right Way 

Quality — Quantity 

24 hour Service 

FARINA & OGLE 

Title Photographers 

At Claremont Laboratories 

430 Claremont Parkway 

Tel. Bingham 2100 






Edwin Carewe has picked J. War- 
ren Kerrigan, Sylvia Breamer and 
Russell Simpson to head his cast for 
"The Girl of the Golden West." 



Vance de Bar Colbig, or Pinto, as 
he is known by his work for the 
United Feature Syndicate, has been 
added to the Al Herman unit at 
Century as gag man. 



Rowland V. Lee is_ directing the 
shooting of scenes which are said to 
number the most people appearing on 
the Metro lot this season. The epi- 
sodes are for "Desire." 



At the United Studios, Allen Holu- 
bar is building an ice rink for 
"Slander the Woman," formerly 
"The White Frontier," in which 
Dorothy Phillips will star. 



The cast for "April Showers" 
will include Colleen Moore, Kenneth 
Harlan, Myrtle Vane, Priscilla Bon- 
ner, Harriet Hammond, Tom Mc- 
Guire and James Corrigan. 



Albert Austin, formerly associated 
with Charlie Chaplin and recently 
director of several Coogan pictures, 
has been engaged to direct the next 
Bull Montana comedy at Metro. 

H. E. GAUSMAN. 



ininmiiiuiiiiuifliiiiM 



KNOW EVERY DAY 
ALL THE NEWS 

OF THE 

PICTURE BUSINESS 



m The Film Daily 

| 71 West 44th St., New York City 

Kindly enter my subscription to The Film Daily for 
H one year, starting immediately, to include 

THE FILM DAILY— 313 Issues— Every Day 
Including Weekly Reviews — 52 Issues 
1922 Year Book— Cloth Bound— 500 pages 

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iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



- 
t 

r 



THE 



i' 



Putting It Over 




DAILY 



Saturday, January 27, 192 



Here is how a brother exhibitor put his show over. Send along 
vour ideas. Let the other fellow know how you cleaned up. 



Bonns Busy Again 

Chicago — Another Goldwyn pic- 
ture has come in for some nation- 
wide exploitation at the hands of 
Eddie Bonns, who was aided by 
Walter D. Nealand, Goldwynner in 
Chicago. 

Three men were selected as presi- 
dent, vice president and secretary- 
treasurer, and papers of incorporation 
of The Anti-Time League filed with 
the secretary of State for Illinois. 
The purpose of the League was de- 
clared to be the doing away with the 
various forms of begging prevalent 
in Chicago — commercial, * household 
and sidewalk begging — and the tip- 
ping nuisance. Hat-check girls and 
boys are under the taboo. 

The Examiner-Herald published a 
two-column story on the incorpora- 
tion of the League and it was sent 
out over various press wires. The 
Herald-Examiner ran an interview 
with Sam Shurman, president of the 
League, then head of the Goldwyn 
sales force in Chicago, since pro- 
moted to be resident manager of the 
Milwaukee exchange. 

A Men's Fashion Show 

Memphis — Taking a tip from 
previous successes in other cities, H. 
B. Clarke, of the Strand, decided on 
a men's fashion show in connection 
with the engagement of "A Tailor 
Made Man." 

His first step was to tie up with 
Phil A. Halls, the most exclusive 
men's furnishing store in Memphis. 
The store supplied all the clothing 
for the fashion show, put in a co- 
operative window display a week in 
advance and mentioned the fashion 
show and picture in all their news- 
paper ads. For models Clarke got 
four young men who were prominent 
church and concert singers and 
formed a quartette. 

This quartette gave two per- 
formances daily, at 4:00 and at 8:45. 
Dressed in the latest fashions, they 
came on the stage one at a time, 
singing the verse of some popular 
number. All would join in for the 
chorus. When they were all assem- 
bled they gave several popular 
selections. 

The lobby display was a special 
set representing the show window of 
a tailor shop. In the foreground was 
a cut-out of Charles Ray in a natty 
business suit. On one side, Ray was 
in his shirt sleeves at a pressing 
table, and on the other side, 
Ray in evening clothes. A cut-out 
of the girl was looking up at the 
cut-out of Ray. Just in front of the 
set and on each side stood cheap look- 
ing tailor's dummies out of compo 
board and painted. One had a sign 
reading $2.98 and the other $5.60. 
A large banner was across the front 
of the lobby. 



Old Vehicles on Parade 

San Francisco — An "old vehicle 
contest," in which prizes were award- 
ed to persons submitting the quaint- 
est antique carriages, constituted an 
exploitation tieup for "Quincy Adams 
Sawyer" when it played at Loew's 
Warfield. Stories in newspaper and 
cuts of the contestants and their 
vehicles drew a great deal of interest 
to the stunt, and a parade of the 
eighteen vehicles through the city 
put a fine finish to it. 

Most of the contestants were girls, 
and some of the coaches that they 
had discovered were popular fifty 
years ago. The oldest vehicles were 
photographed with the girls submit- 
ting them, and the Bulletin published 
a new photograph every day. For 
the best vehicle, a prize of $25 was 
awarded, with a second prize of $15, 
and a third of $10. Other rewards 
consisted of season tickets to the 
Warfield, with a number of tickets 
entitling the holder to see "Quincy 
Adams Sawyer." 



An "Anti-Flirt" Campaign 

All kinds of space was accorded 
an anti-flirt campaign put over by 
Marc Lachmann of Universal on be- 
half of "The Flirt." 

A meeting was held in the Bilt- 
more. Five persons using the names 
of the characters from Booth Tark- 
ington's story, called a meeting to 
order with James Madison presiding, 
while representatives and reviewers 
from all New York newspapers were 
present. Photographers snapped 
flashlights. Two more meetings 
were held and the same representa- 
tives were present with other follow- 
up stories executed. It was not long 
before Boston, Philadelphia and 
other cities started their own crusade 
with local enthusiasts for the move- 
ment interested. Buffalo came out 
with a three column headline pro- 
claiming the debut of the event with 
200 members enlisted right off the 
jump. 

In an N. E. A. feature, which ran 
in 680 newspapers from coast to 
coast, both sides of the flirting situa- 
tion was brought out with James 
Madison's version and that of an 
averse one by a New York business 
girl. K. C. B., Lucy Lowell and 
others contributed syndicate details 
for editorial space in their many 
newspapers. Special tack cards were 
posted all over the city bearing the 
organization's insignia, a lizzard 
pierced by a hat-pin illustrated by a 
drawing of the various modes of 
flirtations. Prior to the opening of 
"The Flirt" at the Rialto, the Crus- 
ade was tied-up with the showing by 
daily newspapers ads. 

Lachmann's stunt was put over 
only after gruelling work on his 
part drilling his "crusaders" in how 
they should act and conduct their 
meetings. A group of highly intelli- 
gent actors and actresses were en- 
gaged for the stunt. 



Short 
Stuff 



The value of the short subject to 
your program. 

How to build a program through 
the use of short stuff. 

How well known exhibitors use 
short subjects to advantage. 

"Fillers" at a price vs. real short 
subjects of material value. 

"How I pick my short subjects" 
by important Broadway managers. 

The news reel and its audience 
value. 

Just a few of the ideas that will 
be presented in the forthcoming 
Short Stuff issue of THE FILM 
DAILY, out Sunday, February 18. 

An unusual "buy* for the pro- 
ducer and distributor of short sub- 
jects, * 



fHE 

BRADSTREET 
FILMDOM 





ZfcRECOCHIZED 

Authority 




XIII No. 27 



Sunday, January 28, 1923 



Price 25 Cent* 




Ohsertcd Jfyr CARL IAEMMLE 

-with, a Cast of rare brilliance , including" 



CHAS.MACK coourtesvnvGriffitii) BURIt McINTOSH 
. > ELEANOR FAIR g 



i 

r 



■ 

C 
1 



GEO.BANCROFT EMn^HTZROY 

from the Prize Story published in Cosmopolitan 
Magazine , "The Flower of the Flock" by JayGelzer 

ACHAS.BRABIN production 

UNIVERSAL JEWEL 



> 



■1 

u- 

i 



Short Stuff 



The value of the short subject to 
your program. 

How to build a program through the 
use of short stuff. 

How well known exhibitors use short 
subjects to advantage. 

* 

"Fillers" at a price vs. real short sub- 
jects of material value. 

"How I pick my short subjects" by 
important Broadway managers. 

The news reel and its audience value. 

Just a few of the ideas that will be 
presented in the forthcoming Short Stuff 
issue of THE FILM DAILY, out Sunday, 
February 19. 



An unusual '"buy' 9 for the producer and dis- 
tributor of short subjects. 



2f*BftADSTREET 
o/FILMDOM 




ZfeRECOCHIZEP 

Authority 



Vol. XXIII No. 27 Sunday, Jan. 28, 1923 Price 25c. 



Copyright, 1923, Wid's Film and Film Folks, Inc. 

Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., New York, N. Y , by 
WID'S FILM AND FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and 
Business Manager; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918. at the post office a' 
New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 1879 

Terms (Pts'agc free), United States, Outside of Greater New York 
$1000 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00 Foreign. $15.00 
Subscribers should remit with order. 

Address all communications to THE FILM DAILY, 71.3 West 44th St.. 

New York, N. Y. Telephone, Vanderbilt 4551 4552-5558 
Hollywood, California: Harvey E. Gausman, 6411 Hollywood Blvd. Phone 

Hollywood 1603. 
Chicago Representative: Irving Mack, 808 South Wabash Ave 
London Representative: Ernest W. Fredman, The Film Renter, 53a Shaftei- 

bury Ave., London, W 1. 
Paris Representative. Le Film, 42, Rue de Clichy. 

Central European Representative : Internationale Filmschau, Pragut 
(Czechoslovakia), Wenzelsplatz. 



Features Reviewed 

THE CHRISTIAN 
Tourneur Prod. — Goldwyn Page 2 

DOLLAR DEVILS 
Victor Schertzinger Prod. — Hodkinson. . Page 3 

Katherine MacDonald in 

MONEY, MONEY, MONEY 
B. P. Schulberg Prod. — Asso. First Nat'l. .Page 6 

Herbert Rawlinsonin THE SCARLET CAR 

Universal Page 7 

Harry Carey in CANYON OF THE FOOLS 

F. B. O Page 10 

Henri Diamant Berger Prod MILADY 

American Releasing Corp Page 11 

Dorothy Dalton in DARK SECRETS 

Paramount Page 14 

Shirley Mason in PAWN TICKET 210 

Fox Page 15 

WHAT A WIFE LEARNED 
Asso. First Nat'l Pict Page 18 

Dorothy Phillips in THE WORLD'S A STAGE 

Principal Pict. — State Rights Page 19 

Viola Dana in CRINOLINE AND ROMANCE 

Metro Page 21 

Short Stuff Page 23 



News of the Week 
in Headlines 

Monday 

Court directs Senator James J. Walker to file new 
complaint in action to recover $6,262 from M.P.T.O. 

Wisconsin M. P. T. O. favors plan of Theater Own- 
ers Dist. Corp. 

Katherine MacDonald completes contract with B. P. 
Schulberg. 

Tuesday 

Several distributors reported seeking George Fitz- 

maurice product. 
Principal Pictures reported having George M. Cohan 

signed. 
S. A. Lynch's deal with Famous Players gives him 

15,000 shares of common stock. 
Hays' office draws up interesting chart with statistics 

for use in censor fights. 

Wednesday 

Charles Chaplin secures all rights on "Dog's Life" 
and "Shoulder Arms" shortly. May reissue them. 

Frank Borzage signed by First National. 

L. J. Selznick in suit seeks return of $28,525, claiming 
usury. 

English producers look for busy year in production. 
German conditions pessimistic. 
Thursday 

T. O. C. C. withdraws representation on local arbitra- 
tion board. Claims F. I. L. M. Club violated faith. 

Congress soon to have change in copyright law sub- 
mitted. Authors' League working for reissues. 

Richard Walton Tully expected to eventually super- 
vise production for First National. 

Censorship outlook in Missouri, Idaho and Iowa bad. 
C. C. Pettijohn on ground. 

Friday 

West Coast Theaters, Inc., buy out T. and D. hold- 
ings in California, including nine theaters, First 
Nat'l franchises in Northern California and New 
York, Educational franchise and 14 houses in South- 
ern California. 

F. I. L. M. Club insists on rider vesting arbitration in 
them ; exhibitors aroused and threatening to quit 
Arbitration Board. 

Carl Laemmle suggests cut in admissions as means to 
boost business. 

Saturday 

Victor Seastrom signed by Goldwyn, 

Allied Prod, and Dist. Corp. expected to release Geo. 
Fitzmaurice Prod, and "Potash and Perlmutter" 
pictures. 

Distributors disturbed over merger of West Coast 
Theaters and T. and D. houses. 



'Pardoning the bad is injuring the good," — Benjamin Franklin, 



THE 



it 

i 



?%^ 



m 



DAILV 



Sunday, January 28, 1923 



Artistic and Spectacular Version of Ha 11 Gaine Novel That Merits High Praise 



Maurice Tourneur Prod. 

"THE CHRISTIAN" 

Goldwyn 

DIRECTOR Maurice Tourneur 

AUTHOR Sir Hall Caine 

SCENARIO BY Paul Bern 

CAMERAMAN Charles Van Enger 

AS A WHOLE Magnificent production that has 

many angles of appeal; a highly artistic and 
worth while picture 

STORY A splendid rendition of the famed novel, 

beautifully told and with much sincerity in its 
theme 

DIRECTION Excellent, on the whole; a few 

slightly irritating bits that can be remedied, 
however ; done on a big scale, lavish and mighty 
artistic 

PHOTOGRAPHY The very best 

LIGHTINGS Many gorgeous effects 

PLAYERS Phyllis Haver the real surprise of 

the company in a short but impressive perform- 
ance; Mae Busch very real and pleasing as the 
heroine and Richard Dix does fine work at first 
but runs into overacting toward the close 

EXTERIORS Unusually fine shots of London 

INTERIORS Appropriate and good to look at 

DETAIL Generally very well taken care of 

CHARACTER OF STORY Minister of Church 

of England breaks cloister vows to return to 
woman he loves who he believes is destined to 
lose her soul 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 8,500 feet 

The very fine effort of Maurice Tourneur who pro- 
duced "The Christian," for Goldwyn, results in a pic- 
ture that is truly a worth while achievement in every 
sense of the word. The story has been gorgeously 
mounted but at the same time retains the dignity and 
solemnity that the atmosphere requires. To the pub- 
lic at large "The Christian" will undoubtedly prove 
one of the outstanding attractions of the year. It de- 
serves that place because Sir Hall Caine's novel has 
been given a careful and complete presentation. 

On the other hand there are points during the run 
of the picture that stand out as being wrong when 
they are compared with other instances of fine judg- 
ment and consideration shown throughout the rest of 
the offering. There are, for instance, the mighty un- 



usual and inspiring shots of London at night — many 
particularly worth while and beautiful views and right 
on top of this fine reality you are asked to accept some 
very obvious studio sets as representing a London 
back street. The shock is too great and the difference 
creates the wrong impression. These shots referred 
to, however, can readily be eliminated without the least 
interference with the continuity. With the exception 
of these incidentals, production values are of the high- 
est type. There are numerous gorgeous locations, 
scene upon scene in which the lighting effects alone 
are a marvel of photography and artistry. 

Then comes Tourneur's attention to the story itself. 
He has developed it logically and evenly. Although 
at times it is just a trifle too arbitrary, the sequences 
dovetail nicely and the interest is well sustained at all 
times. He builds toward the climax surely and with 
an accumulative interest that ends with the riot of 
the mob incited by the priest's enemy and is followed 
by the tranquil reunion of the lovers. The ending, 
as shown for review, is poor in comparison with the 
other fine points in the production. Just one shot of 
the priest recovered, and happy with his bride, would 
be sufficient. The draggy, uneffective sequence that 
follows the riot are out of place and not at all the 
right finale. To have the hero live is what the public 
usually demands, and that can be arranged even 
though the really logical conclusion would be his death 
in the arms of the girl he fought to save. 

Richard Dix, in the famed role of the priest, gives 
a performance that varies. At first he promises to 
really hit the high spots, with a portrayal that is con- 
servative and sincere but later on Dix runs into over- 
acting and forgets all about repression and sincerity. 
In the course of a day, in one sequence, he shows a 
beard that would have taken a week at least to grow. 
Mae Busch is very real and appealing as the girl. Her 
work is convincing and always pleasing but the out- 
standing bit, and a surprise for those who recognize 
the Sennett bathing girl, is the playing of Phyllis 
Haver. She does a genuinely fine piece of dramatic 
portrayal in the role of the unwed mother who kisses 
her baby goodbye and gives it into the care of the 
orphanage before she dies. Miss Haver registers a 
real "choke in the throat" in this scene. The others 
in the cast are quite adequate, including Cyril Chad- 
wick, Mahlon Hamilton, Joseph Dowling, Claude 
Gillingwater and Gareth Hughes. 



Needs Some Change But Should Prove a Fine Attraction 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



With some changes that are obviously necessary without 
suggestion, "The Christian" should prove a worthy addition 
to the list of the "best pictures." For those who crave 
artistic production and unusual atmosphere and backgrounds, 
the offering can be highly recommended, and where they 
want a story with a moral — they couldn't ask for anything 
more indicative of it than Hall Caine's "The Christian." But 
don't give them the impression that it is a preachment. 
Tourneur has steered well clear of that. 

Of course the novel is thoroughly well known. You 
shouldn't have to acquaint them with the story any further 
than the mention of the title, but where they need to be 
reminded, the Goldwyn posters indicate clearly the nature of 
the theme. For the purpose of clarifying it for those who may 



not know that the "priest" in the play is of the Church of 
England, it would be well to make this fact known definitely 
at the first introduction of hero in his clerical attire. Other- 
wise it is liable to cause some dissension where they know 
that the Roman priest is bound to celibacy. 

Give Maurice Tourneur the mention he deserves for his 
work on the picture and let them know it is Goldwyn's most 
pretentious release of the season. Promise them really 
delightful London locations and splendid pictorial values. The 
picture has that. Of the players mention Richard Dix, Mae 
Busch and Phyllis Haver. There are others in the cast 
known to your folks but these are the most prominent. 
When the picture comes to you, in its corrected form, it should 
be well worth your while making a big fuss about the showing. 



Sunday, January 28, 1923 



THE 




daily 



^.•B-.i^an! m^ 



More Small Town Stuff With Usual " Main St." Propaganda 



"DOLLAR DEVILS" 
Victor Schertzinger Prod. — Hodkinson 

DIRECTOR Victor Schertzinger 

AUTHOR Victor Schertzinger 

SCENARIO BY Louis Stevens 

CAMERAMAN John S. Stumar 

AS A WHOLE An average attraction; doesn't 

boast of anything new in story but there is good 

incident and interesting bits 
STORY Given a satisfying production and good 

small town atmosphere usually appeals 
DIRECTION Never for a moment succeeds in 

keeping the ending from you ; anti-climax loses 

interest toward close 

PHOTOGRAPHY All right 

LIGHTINGS Good 

PLAYERS Cullen Landis a first rate hero and 

Joseph Dowling gives a good performance; 

others May Wallace, Eva Novak, Hallam 

Cooley and Lydia Knott 

EXTERIORS , Right 

INTERIORS Suitable 

DETAIL Suffices 

CHARACTER OF STORY Small town hero 

"puts it all over" city slicker who tries to fleece 

the townsfolk 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,600 feet 

Victor Schertzinger didn't have to think very hard 
to concoct this plot of the ever popular oil stock skin 
game nor did he change the atmosphere at all. It 
is the usual small town location with the city slicker 
selling the people the idea that their land holds a 
wealth of oil and the people's salvation is once more 
the town boob. "Dollar Devils" is really very old 
stuff and it runs true to form all the way through with 
Schertzinger never making any strenuous effort to 
keep you from guessing what the conclusion will be. 



Of course you expect hero to really strike oil— and he 
does. Probably the author-director does strike a new 
note in the anti-climax he tacks on; the wells go dry 
and the town once more lapses into peaceful tranquil- 
ity, just a little more prosperous from the profits of 
the wells while they lasted. 

Although there is no originality in the plot itself, 
the story has been rather well handled and there is 
plenty of interesting detail and individually good bits 
that help to relieve the triteness. The town and the 
people offer particularly effective detail and the director 
brings out the peace and easy living in splendid con- 
trast with the excitement and confusion when the city 
fellow starts selling his stock. Joseph Dowling, as 
the most popular person on Main Street, offers a fine 
character bit that is particularly interesting and one 
of the picture's best features. 

Of course there is the usual romance with hero's 
sweetheart "falling" for the newcomer and the subse- 
quent marriage of hero to the gorl's more wholesome 
sister. But even this isn't a surprise. They don't em- 
phasize the domesticity of the stay-at-home girl for 
nothing. You know very well that she will figure in 
the happy ending. The picture is well made, the loca- 
tions are fine and the photography is always good. 

The cast does very well with Cullen Landis a con- 
vincing and sincere hero and Eva Novak as the girl he 
marries. Ney Farrell, the college bred sister, neither 
screens nor acts well. Hallam Cooley is the typical 
"slicker." 

Story: Bruce Merlin insists that there is oil in 
Hemling so he starts selling stock to the inhabitants. 
Jim Biggers, in love with Helen Andrews who recently 
returned from college with high toned notions, tries to 
convince Helen's father that Merlin is a fraud. Helen 
attributes the accusation to jealousy. Later Jim proves 
he is right and Bruce leaves town, Helen going with 
him. How Jim strikes oil, the wells go dry and Jim 
marries Helen's sister completes it. 



All Right If They Don't Object to a Familiar and Transparent Plot 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



If they won't object to a plot that they can see 
through from the very start, and the fact that the 
situations are all very commonplace, you have a chance 
with this one. The good incident and first rate at- 
mosphere does make up, in a measure, for the trite 
things and where you know this line of small town 
stuff appeals to them, it should be an equally safe bet. 

The title might be effectively exploited and it sug- 
gests plenty of ideas for stunt advertising. Let them 



know it is a Victor Schertzinger production and you 
can use the names of the players such as Joseph Dowl- 
ing, Eva Novak and Cullen Landis. Catchlines will 
do for an idea of the story, such as "Are you in search 
of the mighty dollar? The people in Hemling didn't 
care about money but see how they got it any way — 
and then lost it. It happens in 'Dollar Devils,' Vic- 
tqr Schertzinger's latest production." 



°l 



The Greatest of M 
Romantic Melodramas 




CLAIRE WINDSOR 
KENNETH HARLAN 

PAULINE STARKE 

HOBART BOSWORTH 

WALTER LONG 

CYRIL CHADWICK 

ALEX FRANCIS 

WINTER HALL 

MARGARET SEDDEN 

GEORGE COOPER 

STANTON HECK 

FRED STANTON 



AWMtNER BROS 







From the play by Charles E. Blaney and book by Marion Russell 
Story and Scenario by Olga Printzlau . . Directed by Wm. A. Seiter 



A BIG, Vital Story of Conflicts and Contrasts, of a Love 
Imperishable, a Beautiful Romance and Thrilling, 
Pulse Quickening Adventure. 

"The Little Church Around the Corner" is Modern 
Melodrama with Traditional Prestige to Back it Up. 



CIAS SIC oPtKe SCREEN 



—. -WW 



DAILY 



Sunday, January 28, 1923 



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3 



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i- 
i 



Vehicle Wholly Inappropriate For Katherine MacDonald 



Katherine MacDonald in 

"MONEY, MONEY, MONEY" 

B. P. Schulberg Prod. — Asso. First Nat'l Pict. 

DIRECTOR Tom Forman 

AUTHOR Larry Evans 

SCENARIO BY Hope Loring 

CAMERAMAN Jos. Brotherton 

AS A WHOLE Starts out to be an interesting 

picture but drifts into the commonplace very 
shortly 

STORY A vehicle that doesn't suit the star at 

all and it is difficult for her to make an impres- 
sion in it 

DIRECTION Fair; nothing out of the ordinary 

and doesn't give material any unusual treat- 
ment 

PHOTOGRAPHY All right 

LIGHTINGS Satisfactory 

STAR Handicapped in this one 

SUPPORT Average; includes Carl Stockdale, 

Frances Raymond, Charles Clary and Jack 
Dougherty 

EXTERIORS Pretty country club views 

INTERIORS Suitable 

DETAIL A lot of sub-titles 

CHARACTER OF STORY Daughter with 

father of moderate circumstances makes a 
splurge with inherited money only to learn that 
it was a fraud 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,995 feet 

Katherine MacDonald is well past the stage where 
she can play the pretty ingenue and convince her 
audience. Nor does she succeed in putting the role of 
Priscilla Hobbs over in her latest release "Money, 
Money, Money," a story of a small town girl who was 
bored by the modern circumstances of her old fashion- 
ed parents and whose desire for the luxuries of life 
almost ruined her father financially. The star just 
doesn't fit in with these surroundings and it is almost 
ridiculous to try and place her in a vehicle which is 



far from suited to either her personality or ability. 

Nor has Tom Forman used his best judgment in the 
picture's direction. He allows too many sentimental 
bits between the father and daughter. It looks a 
trifle silly to see a man fondling and calling his daugh- 
ter "baby" and treating her like one when she's a 
mature woman. It doesn't "belong" and they are like- 
ly to get a laugh out of it that isn't intended. Kath- 
erine MacDonald makes an attractive society belle 
or the wife of screen brokers, lawyers and doctors, but 
she's far from her right place as the young country 
girl. 

There are some obviously poor bits in the picture 
that may even attract the attention of the casual ob- 
server. For instance, when the Hobbs' take advantage 
of their newly acquired fortune and move into a house 
in the residential district, they later show old Hobbs 
in the sitting room of the old home. But they don't 
explain whether or not Hobbs is maintaining two es- 
tablishments — both the old and the new. In the last 
reel, after Priscilla and the man who is to save her 
father's business, have ridden all night through a 
raging storm in an open car, they appear in the same 
clothes bone dry and none the worse for the journey. 
There are other bits of detail that Forman has 
slipped up on. 

The moral of the story is that money causes un- 
happiness to those who have it and also to those who 
do not possess it. But whether or not they'll believe 
it from this is a grave question. Charles Clary over- 
works his eyebrows for expression ^nd Jack Daugh- 
erty is not the hero he promises to be. The cast is 
adequate. 

Story : Priscilla Hobbs' immediately begins to 
spend her newly inherited fortune only to learn later 
that it was a scheme of her father's enemy, Carter, to 
ruin them. How Priscilla learns that money is not 
everything and saves her father by her quick action, 
and later marries the son of a rich man, completes the 
story. 



All Right If They Are Not Particular Or Like Star Real Well 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



This one is all wrong from a viewpoint of the star. 
She is miscast and her director has done nothing to 
counteract the inappropriateness of the story. In fact 
he has made it worse by stressing things that should 
have been passed over lightly and emphasizing inci- 
dents that should have been omitted. However, if 
they like Katherine MacDonald well enough to accept 
her regardless of what she has to do, you can show it 
to them. 



The star tries very hard to convince and her work 
itself is thoroughly satisfying. The country club 
sequences will undoubtedly appeal and possibly you 
can interest them with the title used in connection 
with catchlines that explain those who have money are 
unhappy and those who haven't it are unhappy. Ask 
them to figure it out and then come in to see the 
picture. 



THE 



Sunday, January 28, 1923 



<2^S 



DAILY 



Richard Harding Davis' Story a Good Vehicle for Rawlinson 



Herbert Rawlinson in 

"THE SCARLET CAR" 

Universal 

DIRECTOR Stuart Paton 

AUTHOR Richard Harding Davis 

SCENARIO BY Geo. Randolph Chester 

CAMERAMAN Virgil Miller 

AS A WHOLE Good diversion in Rawlinson's 

latest; blends action, romance and comedy 
nicely 
STORY From the pen of Richard Harding Da- 
vis; supplies first rate screen material although 
not all the situations are new 

DIRECTION Keeps story going at a good pace 

and maintains even interest throughout; han- 
dles player very well 

PHOTOGRAPHY Good 

LIGHTINGS Good 

STAR Does less overacting than usual for him 

SUPPORT Tom O'Brien an interesting char- 
acter and others are Claire Adams, Edward Ce- 
cil, Norris Johnson, Tom McGuire and Marc 
Robbins 

EXTERIORS All right 

INTERIORS Appropriate 

DETAIL All right 

CHARACTER OF STORY Candidate for mayor 

loses support of his backer at the last minute 
on evidence of fellow whose girl he stole 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 4,417 feet 

. Richard Harding Davis' story offers Herbert Raw- 
linson one of the best vehicles he has had lately and 
Rawlinson does better work and manages to forget 
most of his tricks of overacting — all of which con- 
tributes to a satisfying entertainment in his most re- 
cent release, "The Scarlet Car." Davis' material makes 
a first rate screen vehicle aside from its suitability to 
Rawlinson. It contains a 'satisfying variety of enter- 



taining elements that have been nicely worked together 
and well blended together. 

While some of the situations are not strictly new, 
especially the idea of the election candidate who runs 
for mayor on one ticket and accepts graft from the 
opposing party to put through certain franchises for 
them as soon as he is elected. This angle isn't new 
but it has been worked in with plenty of original by- 
plot that makes it wholly interesting and there is also 
some first rate comedy business that heads off any 
attempt to make it appear too serious or dramatic. 
The material has been used to very good advantage 
by Stuart Paton and there is one bit that he saves 
from becoming too far-fetched by supplying a comic 
touch. 

One of the most interesting of the characters is that 
of Beans Bradley, played by Tom O'Brien. Beans is 
a typical Bowery boy who isn't going to see his "goil" 
copped by a rich "guy." O'Brien supplies most of the 
laughs but his character doesn't run quite true to form 
when he allows Rawlinson to give him a beating. 

The piece also contains some first rate action which, 
although not terribly exciting, supplies the essential 
variation. The picture, on the whole, offers a good 
lively entertainment that will likely be accorded a 
favorable reception by the majority of audiences. 

Story : Bill Winthrop's father is supporting Ernest 
Peabody, candidate for mayor. Bill doesn't like Pea- 
body, one reason being that Peabody is engaged to the 
girl Bill loves. Bill encounters Beans Bradley, who 
promises that he has enough "on" Peabody to expose 
him and spoil his chances of election. After some com- 
plications Beans tells Bill that Peabody has betrayed 
his (Beans') girl and that he has also accepted graft 
from the opposite party. Bill follows Peabody out 
into the country and Peabody makes a hasty retreat 
while Bill wins the girl and Beans gets his sweetheart 
back. 



Will Suit Those Who Like a Good Lively Story 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Herbert Rawlinson's following will have a good one 
coming to them in "The Scarlet Car." It's more the 
sort of thing that suits Rawlinson and he does better 
work here than he has in his last two pictures. Of 
course let them know that it is a Richard Harding 
Davis story and in case they may remember a picture 
that Universal made several years ago under the same 
name, say that this is an entirely new picture. 



You can promise a good variety of entertaining ele- 
ments and catchlines will do to give them an idea of 
what it is all about if you think they'll want to know. 
Say: "He almost became mayor but then something 
happened. See what it was. Herbert Rawlinson up- 
set the candidate's plans. His latest picture at the 
blank theater offers a good entertainment. See 'The 
Scarlet Car!'" 



e 

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a VICTOR SCHERTZINGER production 



BOX- OFFICE 






















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/'DOLLAR DEVILS" is a production 
that is better than 80° . of the pictures 
released to-day. It is one of those clean, 
wholesome, intensely interesting and 
well made. pictures that breakbox-office 
records, build patronage and go such a 
long way in increasing theatre prestige. 

^ Every first run theatre in the country 
needs such a feature as "DOLLAR 
DEVILS". Ask for a screening at once. 



a HODKINSON picture 



THE 



10 



■c&?± 



DAILY 



Sunday, January 28, 1923 



Action and Thrills After the Fashion of a Serial 



Harry Carey in 

"CANYON OF THE FOOLS" 

Film Booking Offices 

DIRECTOR ^ Val Paul 

AUTHOR Richard Matthews Hallett 

SCENARIO BY ..John W. Grey 

CAMERAMEN Wm. Thornley and Robert 

DeGrasse 

AS A WHOLE Average western with plenty of 

helter skelter action; will please where they 
are not critical 
STORY A commonplace plot built up with fair- 
ly good by-plot and incident; a confusing climax 
DIRECTION Ordinary; provides good atmo- 
sphere but hasn't given story coherent or log- 
ical development 

PHOTOGRAPHY All right 

LIGHTINGS All right 

STAR A slightly different western role for him 

but gives him plenty to do 

SUPPORT Marguerite Clayton adequate as 

lead; others Fred Stanton, Jack Curtis, Joseph 
Harris and Charles Le Moyne 

EXTERIORS A . Good 

INTERIORS Not many 

DETAIL Cutting frequently bad 

CHARACTER OF STORY Man in search of 

- one who framed him for murder meets former 
sweetheart and saves her from man who turns 
out to be the one he is looking for 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 6,000 feet 

Very likely Harry Carey's latest picture will prove 
sure-fire entertainment for some audiences because it 
contains a typical old-fashioned western melodrama 
plot with all the intrigue, fighting and thrills of the 
10-20-30 order — the kind that still does big business in 
certain communities. For them "Canyon of 'the 
Fools" will supply the right entertainment. But if 



you haven't that class of patronage the picture will 
require further consideration. 

In the first place Richard Matthews Hallett hasn't 
included any situations in his story that haven't al- 
ready been used dozens of time, nor is the atmosphere 
at all new. Then Val Paul's direction doesn't save it. 
He doesn't tell the story in coherent fashion and to- 
ward the close the action is of such a helter skelter 
variety that it is almost impossible to tell who is ahead 
— whether hero and his band is overcoming villain 
and his crowd or vice versa. Bad cutting in this se- 
quence is also responsible for the confusion in the mind 
of the spectator. Just why they thought it necessary 
to have a storm in the climax is hard to tell. It doesn't 
make things any more exciting and the rain is far from 
realistic. It just looks as though they were using a 
sprinkling pot in front of the camera. Of course it 
is possible for it to be raining with the sun* shining, 
but it is hardly likely that, with such a downpour, the 
horses hoofs would raise such a cloud of smoke. 

The plot is of the serial order with hero knocked 
out in every reel and coming back stronger than ever 
in the next. Toward the close, when they attempt to 
get things going faster for the climax, the action gets 
beyond you and it is mostly a matter of waiting for the 
last shot to see who wins, in case there is any doubt 
in your mind. The flood offers a fair thrill. 

Harry Carey hasn't the sentimental cowboy hero 
role in this but he is kept hard at it tracking down the 
man who framed him for a murder and saving the life 
of the girl he loves. Marguerite Clayton does well as 
the girl. The others are well suited. 

Story: Bob arrives in "Canyon of the Fools" on the 
trail of a man who framed him. He meets his former 
sweetheart, May, who is also at the place to marry 
Harper, a prospector. Harper does not come to meet 
her. Bob is made deputy sheriff and sent out to the 
mining district to bring in a thief. Harper turns out 
to be both the thief and Bob's man. Bob marries May. 



All Right If They Are Not Too Critical Or If They Like Carey 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Where they* want good fast action and won't mind 
if they can't always follow it, "Canyon of the Fools" 
is your picture. And this isn't to say that it hasn't a 
chance because there is a crowd that will be thor- 
oughly well satisfied with just such action as this pic- 
ture contains. They like the serial type of thrills and 
action and that is what this one, based on a Saturday 
Evening Post story, resembles mostly. It is a series 
of captures and escapes with hero, of course, coming 
out victor in the end. 



Harry Carey has a loyal following and they'll un- 
doubtedly be satisfied with his latest attraction. You 
might say that it is a little different from his more 
recent releases and catchlines will give a further idea. 
Say : "In search of the man who framed him for mur- 
der, Carey finds his man in 'Canyon of the Fools' and 
also wins back the girl he loves." If they are ac- 
quainted with Marguerite Clayton use her name also. 



THE 



Sunday, Janua ry 28, 1923 

■BBBMBB^BBBB^HBM 






DAILY 



n 



French Production of Dumas' Novel That Has Interesting Angles 



Henri Diamant-Berger Prod. 

"MILADY" 
American Releasing Corp. 

DIRECTOR Henri Diamant-Berger 

AUTHOR Alexandre Dumas 

SCENARIO BY Not credited 

CAMERAMAN Not credited 

AS A WHOLE Well made French production 

that will please and interest those who like 
costume plays 

STORY A sequence of "The Three Musketeers" 

as Dumas wrote it 

DIRECTION Satisfactory— difficult to judge 

from certain angles in view of extensive cutting 
which production has evidently undergone 

PHOTOGRAPHY Usually all right 

LIGHTINGS Vary; sometimes very good 

PLAYERS . . . Capable French players though several 
lack the ease and assurance of our own per- 
formers 

EXTERIORS Good 

INTERIORS Suitable 

DETAIL Adequate 

CHARACTER OF STORY Romance and tragedy 

in historical setting 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 7,000 feet 

There is a good deal that is interesting and worth 
while in this French production, a sequence of "The 
Three Musketeers," as Dumas wrote it, and for those 
who like historic romances and the atmosphere of 
the costume play, "Milady" will prove an agreeable 
entertainment. Lovers of Dumas, disappointed in the 
Fairbanks' picture because it did not cover the entire 
story, will find much in this to please, although the 



Berger picture does not succeed in getting the spec- 
tator's undivided attention at the start. 

The picture bears every evidence of having been 
severely cut to fit the American program, and while 
the cutting has been carefully done and there are no 
very noticeable interruptions in the continuity, still 
the little breaks are obvious all through, some more 
so than others. There are one or two bad bits of 
cutting where they have clipped the film right in the 
middle of the scene. For instance where Richelieu 
is seated at a desk on which a kitten is walking around, 
the kitten suddenly disappears. However, this is not 
a frequent occurrence and considering the vast amount 
of eliminations, the work has been carefully done. 

There are numerous sub-titles, long and explanatory 
which make up for much of the detail omitted, and 
through this means the story maintains a satisfactory 
coherence, even though it jumps over some sequences 
more rapidly than it should to be satisfactorily con- 
vincing. 

"Milady" contains some first rate dramatic touches, 
and its tragic ending is probably the most distinctive 
feature of it. There are also some effective action 
sequences, such as the escape of Milady de Winter 
from the tower in which she is imprisoned. Berger 
has provided an artistic production that shows exceed- 
ing care in connection with its settings, costuming 
and general atmosphere. The players are handled to 
good advantage at all times, and while there are no 
particularly outstanding performances, the cast is 
well balanced and quite capable. These French play- 
ers have not the assurance of our own artists, but one 
thing they do possess is grace and they wear costumes 
very well. 



Will do Nicely Where They Like Historical Costume Plays 

Box Offices Analysis for the Exhibitor 



It is up to the individual exhibitor to decide whether 
or not his particular clientele will favor "Milady." If 
you cater to a better class audience and one that will 
be interested in a well made production that shows 
a serious effort to be something worth while, you may 
fell quite sure of interesting them with "Milady." 
Where they favor historical spectacles it should be 
simple to get them in. There is sufficient to talk about. 
Say it is a sequence of Dumas' "The Three Mus- 
keteers" and promise a pleasing atmosphere. 



Where they liked "The Three Musketeers," it should 
be easy to judge this one. You can decide for your- 
self whether or not you care to announce the origin 
of the production. The names alone will not mean 
very much to your crowd, so the title will have to 
be used with catchlines or other explanation. None 
of the players are known, but you might make the 
most of the author's name. 



QGneat Romance lhat Starts Whore 







Evening Mail says: "Here is a really fine picture. 
In fact, so good that if France sends over any 
more of the same excellence the Germans will 
lose their prestige in production. Audiences 
who want to know what became of D'Artagnan 
and his gallant companions who swore c all for 
one and one for all' will revel in this picture." 







New York American says: "Those 
interested in 'what happened after 
that,' when the final curtain fell on 
'The Three Musketeers,' can have 
their curiosity satisfied in 'Milady' 
at the Cameo. It is the sequel to 
Dumas' greatest romance. An ab- 
sorbed version of the adventure of 
Milady de Winter and her vicious 
partnership withCardinal Richelieu. 
A diverting, attractive, artistic pic- 
ture. Spectators will revel in the 
chivalric acts of D'Artagnan and 
his celebrated trio." 

New York Globe says: "No difference 
in technical standards can take away 
from 'Milady' the spirit of romance 
and adventure put into it by virtue 



of uncommonly fine acting. This 
picture doesn't have to trade under 
the publicity of 'The Three Mus- 
keteers.' 'Milady' will win the 
approval of audiences on its own 
merits." 

Evening Telegram says: " 'Milady' 
is a complete story, splendidly told; 
a great romantic thriller and in no 
way dependent upon a previous 
knowledge of 'The Three Mus- 
keteers.' It is filled with thrills and 
spectacular moments throughout." 

New York Evening Post says: 
"'Milady'is filled with many stirring 
scenes and it tells its story in an 
absorbing way." 



*lhe Ikree. musketeers" Finished 

Here is a smashing eight-reel romantic melodrama that we brought 
into New York absolutely unannounced, opening it with a minimum 
of advertising at the Cameo Theatre and receiving the best notices given 
to any picture on Broadway in six months. The reviews average 
bigger and better than those accorded any super-special in the fall 
and winter seasons. 

iVeit; YorA: Times says: "A motion picture of remarkable quality yes- 
terday entered what one who enjoyed it keenly must hope will be a 
fully successful week at the Cameo. It is called 'Milady' and is a 
successor if not exactly a sequel to 'The Three Musketeers.' The film 
is one of the most absorbing, and, in its separate scenes, one of the most 
finished pieces of dramatic cinematography that has brightened Broad- 
way for a long time. It is closer to Dumas and to the France he wrote 
of than 'The Three Musketeers.' This is not said in disparagement ol 
'The Three Musketeers.' It was a magnificent work of its kind. But 
'Milady' is something different and differently eloquent. It is a fine 
and effective work. Its scenes are dramatically compelling, especially 
the scenes of the execution of the evil Milady. This sequence is one of 
the most stirring things ever put upon the motion picture screen." 





iladi] 

<* HENRI DIAMANT-BERGER PRODUCTION 



^meripan 



WALTPR E. GREENE, Prtadmi 



TRADE MARK REG. U. £ PAT OFFICE 



New York Sun says: "This picture 
can stir your pulses with its authen- 
tic settings and chivalrous conduct, 
when it tells you what becomes of 
the dauntless musketeers after they 
had wiped up most of France." 

New York Tribune says: " 'Milady' 
is one of the pictures which should 
not be missed. Put it on your list. 
Well acted, exceptionally so, with a 
great D'Artagnan and a still greater 
Milady, the woman of the fleur-de- 
lys." 

Evening World says: "If you like 
the romance of the days when 
D'Artagnan was in style, you will 
revel in this picture 'Milady,' from 
one of Dumas' best stories." 




New York Telegraph says: "Ro- 
mance is not dead. It lives and 
breathes again in 'Milady.' The pro- 
ducers have adhered to actual his- 
torical facts and have not dis- 
torted the story in an effort 
to achieve a happy ending." 

New York World says 
"On the powdered, white 
shoulder of the leading 
woman in'Milady' there 
is a fleur-de-lys. The 
brand of the wanton. 
What more could be 
asked? It is a story 
of conspiracy 
passion and 
love." 



^m 



14 



THE 



■c@£l 



DAILV 



Sunday, January 28, 1923 



kss 



A Fair Picture But Material Not the Best Suited for Star 



Dorothy Dalton in 

"DARK SECRETS" 

Paramount 

DIRECTOR Victor Fleming 

AUTHOR Edmund Goulding 

SCENARIO BY Edmund Goulding 

CAMERAMAN Hal Rosson 

AS A WHOLE A fair entertainment with a 

rather weird theme and improbable oriental 
twists 

STORY May appeal to some but possibly too 

far-fetched to make a good number for the 
majority 
DIRECTION Satisfactory; provides a good pro- 
duction and picture is always good to look at 

PHOTOGRAPHY First rate 

LIGHTINGS All right 

STAR Suitable but needs stronger material than 

that afforded by "Dark Secrets" 

SUPPORT Jose Ruben has best acting part and 

does very well; Robert Ellis adequate; others 
Ellen Cassidy, Pat Hartigan and Warren Cook 

EXTERIORS A few and those attractive 

INTERIORS Good 

DETAIL Ample 

CHARACTER OF STORY Arabian exercises 

will power to influence crippled girl to walk and 
reverses power when she repulses him 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 4,337 feet 

Considering the very light weight material that Vic- 
tor Fleming had to work with in Edmund Goulding's 
story, "Dark Secrets," the picture is much better than 
you might imagine it could be. But this isn't to say 
that it is a good entertainment. It may appeal to 
those who favor oriental atmosphere and some slightly 
original twists that have a bearing on the present pop- 
ular Coue theory — autosuggestion. 



The picture is quite short and then Director Flem- 
ing has managed to sustain the interest surprisingly 
well in view of a scarcity of incident and by-plot. The 
opening scenes appeal largely to the eye and you are 
promised an interesting romance which is immediately 
interrupted by a pretty fair thrill: the heroine is per- 
manently injured when thrown from a horse which she 
has wagered she will tame. The subsequent procedure 
is seldom convincing and the piece threatens to "flop" 
for a bit, but evidently the film editor has saved it by 
immediately getting into the oriental episode where the 
climax is reached. ■ 

Dorothy Dalton does good work as the girl in love 
with an English officer stationed in Cairo, but the real 
acting of the film is contributed by Jose Ruben as the 
suave Arabian doctor, whose will causes people to do 
as he wishes them to do. This angle bears slightly 
on the current Coue theory of auto-suggestion — that 
certain ills may be cured by one's own will. The di- 
rect climax, however, has served previously in pic- 
tures and crippled heroes and heroines have found the 
use of their limbs in a moment when they least expect- 
ed it. In this instance the girl jumps from her wheel 
chair to save her lover from death at the hands of a 
native. 

The picture contains a good amount of pictorial ap- 
peal. The settings are attractive and the acting, on 
the whole, well done. The photography throughout 
is also excellent. Certainly "Dark Secrets" is not long 
enough to bore anyone even if it doesn't happen to 
appeal to them particularly. 

Story: Ruth Rutherford releases Lord Wallington 
from their engagement when she is crippled. Later 
she goes to Wallington in Cairo after hearing he is 
drinking himself to death. Dr. Ali, an enemy of Wal- 
lington's, operates upon Ruth and is successful. He 
demands payment — the usual kind. She refuses and 
Ali is killed by Wallington's servant. 



May Please Some and Has Angles That Can Be Exploited 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



If you don't think they will be disappointed you 
might easily arouse their curiosity to see this one by 
mentioning the fact that it touches on the Coue theory 
nf autosuggestion. The topic is open to so much dis- 
cussion at this time that it should be simple to get 
them interested through this channel, or if you prefer 
to stick to names, of course the star's will be given the 
most prominence. Her admirers may not be satisfied 



with what she is given to do but with them "Dark 
Secrets" will undoubtedly get over. 

Where they like thrills you might mention the spill 
when the heroine is thrown from her horse and in- 
jured ; where she is attacked by the doctor who has 
cured her and her final miraculous recovery when she 
rushes to the rescue of her lover. Paramount's press 
sheet has ample suggestions for further exploitation. 



THE 



Sunday, January 28, 1923 



"«^2 



DAILV 



.5 



Star Pleasing in Picture That Has Good Drama and Human Interest 



Shirley Mason in 

"PAWN TICKET 210" 

Fox 

DIRECTOR Scott Dunlap 

AUTHORS David Belasco and Clay M. Greene 

SCENARIO BY Jules Furthman 

CAMERAMAN George Schneiderman 

AS A WHOLE Pleasing human interest story 

that will go big with star's admirers and gen- 
eral public 

STORY From a Belasco stage play; serves as 

a first rate vehicle for Shirley Mason and con- 
tains good dramatic situations 

DIRECTION Very good except that the ending 

is dragged a trifle; plenty of good touches and 
right atmosphere 

PHOTOGRAPHY All right 

LIGHTINGS Standard 

STAR Appealing and does good work in this 

SUPPORT Fred Warren offers fine character 

bit and others are Robert Agnew, Irene Hunt, 
Dorothy Manners 

EXTERIORS Suitable 

INTERIORS Adequate 

DETAIL Ample 

CHARACTER OF STORY Child left in care of 

pawnshop keeper learns her father came be- 
tween her benefactor and his wife 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 4,871 feet 

Not long ago Shirley Mason's sister, Viola Dana, 
appeared in a picture that was very much like this 
one. Metro released it under the name of "The Five 
Dollar Baby" and although it differed somewhat in 
plot it had the same basic theme as "Pawn Ticket 
210." There is much in this picture that will appeal 
to the average audience and the element of human in- 
terest which it contains is sufficiently strong to make 
it particularly popular with women patrons. 



Shirley is given into the keeping of a pawnbroker 
whose wife has just deserted him. He lavishes his love 
on the child and the prologue ends with her grown up. 
This consumes the first reel of the picture and estab- 
lishes a definite premise and gets the attention clearly 
centered upon Shirley and her benefactor, Uncle Har- 
ris, as she calls him. Then Dunlap proceeds to de- 
velop the story in a smooth, consistent fashion that 
accumulates interest as it goes along. The director 
has succeeded in injecting force into the dramatic 
moments and with the exception of the way he has 
handled the ending, his efforts have been worth while. 
The conclusion does drag slightly, however, and it 
takes too long to reach the inevitable happy finale. 
Since you know it is bound to come, it doesn't prove 
quite as effective as it might if they had used less 
footage to get to it. 

The climax has been nicely reached and it isn't 
likely that many in the audience will think out a solu- 
tion to the^plot as it really happens. In this respect 
Dunlap has certainly kept things from becoming ob- 
vious before the right time and the surprise that it 
offers is the real thing. 

Shirley Mason has a role particularly well suited 
to her personality and it allows her the sort of emo- 
tional playing that she seems to like. Robert Agnew 
in the lead does good work and the supporting cast 
includes Fred Warren, as the pawnshop keeper, also 
Irene Hunt, Jacob Abrams and Dorothy Manners. 

Story : A woman places her child in the custody of 
Harris Levi, pawnbroker, who gives her pawn ticket 
210 as a receipt. Fifteen years later the woman pre- 
sents the receipt and asks for her daughter. Levi takes 
her to the home of his rich friend, Mr. Strong, where 
the girl is living. Levi then learns that Strong is the 
woman's husband and that the wife who deserted Levi 
years before was the cause of their separation. Levi 
denounces his friend but there is a reconciliation 
brought about through the girl's effort. 



Get Your Women Patrons Interested in This. They'll Like It 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



This picture can be recommended for most any au- 
dience. It is a first rate dramatic offering that has a 
pleasing star, a first rate romantic twist, strong dra- 
matic situations and a surprise climax that should 
make it a thoroughly satisfying entertainment. You 
can arouse their interest by telling them of the woman 
who pawned her baby, or if you prefer to put it another 
way you might ask : "What did 'Pawn Ticket 210' 



represent? You'll be surprised if you come to the 
blank theater and find out." 

Shirley Mason's admirers can be appealed to par- 
ticularly and you can promise them they'll like her 
work in this. Your women patrons will like the pic- 
ture especially well, so you might direct most of your 
publicity to them. Play up the title with the star's 
name also. 



ASSOCIATED 



FOREIGN REPRESENTATIVE 
SIDNEY GARRETT 



ARTHUR S. KANE, 



nlroduceA^y 





(Nationally Advertised 



in 



THE SATURDAY 
EVENING POST 

and in four bi$ fan publications 

Photoplay • Motion Picture Classic 
Motion Picture • Picture -play ! 

A constructive ptan of interesting^ 
your public, national in scope, 

local in effect. 



EXHIBITORS 



Pre s ide n.t 



Physical Distributors 

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THE SATURDAY EVENING POST 



FEBRUARY 3rd, 1923 



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The left hand page also appears 
in the March issue (out in Feb- 
ruary) of Photoplay, Motion 
Picture Classic, Motion Picture, 
Picture Play. 

Constance Binney in "A Bill of Divorcement" 
"The Woman Who Fooled Herself" with May Allison and Robert Ellis. 

Martin Johnson's "Head Hunters of the South Seas" 

Saturday Evening Post, March 3rd and April fan magazines 
(out in March) Monte Blue and Mary Alden in "The Tents 
of Allah." "Breaking Home Ties" inspired by the heart song 
of centuries "Eli. Eli." 



Coming: 



THE 



18 



iSBtl 



DAILV 



Sunday, January 28, 1923 



The Old Question of Marriage or a Ga reer Worked Out with Much Argument 



Thomas H. Ince presents 

"WHAT A WIFE LEARNED" 

Asso. First Nat'l Pict. 

DIRECTOR John Griffith Wray 

AUTHOR Bradley King 

SCENARIO BY Not credited 

CAMERAMAN Henry Sharp 

AS A WHOLE The usual Ince melodrama with 

the customary hokum that provides a plot but 

isn't convincing 
STORY Will please a big majority especially 

the admirers of meller and those who favor this 

type of plot 
DIRECTION The kind that goes with this sort 

of story; adequate but not out of the ordinary 

PHOTOGRAPHY All right 

LIGHTINGS Good 

PLAYERS John Bowers and Marguerite De La 

Motte do good work in principal roles; Milton 

Sills, the other man 

EXTERIORS Suitable 

INTERIORS All right 

DETAIL Adequate 

CHARACTER OF STORY Husband, jealous of 

wife's career, leaves her but later is reunited 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 6,228 feet 

All the incident, coincidence and inconsistencies of 
meller are prominent in this latest Thomas H. Ince 
production, a typical Ince entertainment of its kind. 
"What a Wife Learned" doesn't give out any start- 
ling information or disclosures such as the title might 
suggest. In fact at the end it isn't apparent that the 
wife knows any more than she did in the opening reel 
when she was a school teacher. If she is any wiser, 
she doesn't show it. A much better title would have 
been "What a Husband Couldn't Learn," for cer- 
tainly the husband of pretty Sheila Dome, .novelist 



and playwright, is certainly a stupid young man- and 
he is made quite inconsistent at several times through- 
out the progress of the story. However, he and his 
pretty young writer-wife worry along through six 
reels of misunderstandings until Director Wray de- 
cides to reunite them to "live happy ever after." 

Beyond the continual eruptions in the domestic life 
of the cattle rancher and his pretty wife, there is little 
of interest in the picture. It is an arbitrary plot that 
doesn't get far as entertainment, nor does Wray's 
direction sustain the interest satisfactorily, although 
it would have been difficult to do very much better 
with such poor situations. The spectator gets more 
or less peeved at being taken into the confidence of 
the couple's marital difficulties to such an extent that 
it lasts for the six reels. Each succeeding episode is 
a repetition of the last — Jim and Sheila continuing 
their incompatibility. 

Eventually the plot promises to develop into the 
old eternal triangle and it probably would have only 
the dam breaks and the usual thing happens; the hus- 
band saves the life of the other man, who in grati- 
tude tells the husband that his wife really loves him. 
Funny how screen husbands always believe this when 
coming from the other man, but their wives can't tell 
it to them. All the hokum in this runs true to form 
so if folks don't mind having everything all figured 
out for them, and like a story that doesn't require any 
thought on their part, they'll be suited with "What a 
Wife Learned." 

Milton Sills gives up the hero role to John Bowers, 
the very stupid husband. Bowers does his best to get 
the part over, but it isn't a very nice part to have to 
make convincing. Sills takes the "other man" role 
and works it out satisfactorily enough. Marguerite 
De La Motte is a pretty Sheila. Production is all right 
except for the miniatures used for the dam. Photog- 
raphy is also first rate. 



Very Commonplace But Still the Type That Suits a Good Many 



Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



There is a good market for this picture because a 
great many folks like these domestic dramas with 
meller attachments to give it the spice. They'll gasp 
when hero nearly loses his life while working, as a 
riveter, on a new building. There's a real thrill in it 
for the moment. You can talk about the idea of a 
woman who tries to choose between marriage and a 
career and of the difficulties presented when she tries 
to do both. Perhaps you could get them interested 



by playing up this angle. Your women, particularly, 
can be appealed to. They'll like Marguerite De La 
Motte. She's very good to look at. 

Milton Sills' admirers will come in to see him and 
you can also use John Bowers' name. Say it is a 
Thomas H. Ince production, but if Ince's "The Hot- 
tentot" precedes this one don't talk too much about 
this one. The former is so very much better they'll 
expect a repeater. 



THE 



Sunday, January 28, 1923 






DAILV 



19 



A Play of Hollywood and Its People Th at Should Attract the Public 



Dorothy Phillips in. 

"THE WORLD'S A STAGE" 

Principal Pictures — State Rights 

DIRECTOR Colin Campbell 

AUTHOR Elinor Glyn 

SCENARIO BY Colin Campbell and Geo. 

Bertholon 

CAMERAMAN Dal Clawson and Chas. Haskins 

AS A WHOLE Very likely to please a majority, 

the "fan" crowd particularly, since it deals with 

Hollywood and its people 
STORY A novelty in some ways and very old 

stuff in other ways; the usual Elinor Glyn 

philosophy, however 
DIRECTION All right on the whole; studio bits 

will go big; climax offers a bit of meller 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS Good 

STAR Thoroughly pleasing and convincing; 

rather a too patient sufferer, however 
SUPPORT Quite well suited; includes Bruce 

McRae, Kenneth Harlan, and Otis Harlan 

EXTERIORS Good 

INTERIORS Appropriate 

DETAIL Adequate 

CHARACTER OF STORY Motion picture 

actress marries drinker who eventually dies, 

leaving her free to marry man who really loves 

her 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,977 feet 

It would seem that this latest production starring 
Dorothy Phillips would be a mighty attractive feature 
for the average picture audience because it is a decided 
novelty in that it deals with Hollywood, the home of 
motion pictures, and its people ; and the public is only 
too anxious to know the more intimate details of both 
the making of pictures and the personal affairs of 
those who make them. "The World's a Stage" gives 



them a fine insight into both and at the same time it 
looks like a first rate piece of propaganda since the 
heroine is all that a good true wife should be and the 
tendency is to show that the private lives of the 
Hollywood players are very much like those of other 
people. 

The opening reel secures the spectator's interest 
and development is such that it maintains the same 
tempo throughout and finally culminates in a melo- 
dramatic climax that precedes the final happy ending 
in which the patient and enduring young wife is happy 
with the man who has long been in love with her. 
Incidental to the plot there are some bits that will 
certainly appeal to the average audience. They show 
the interior of the studio and the spectator gets a 
pretty fair idea of how they "shoot" a set. These are 
the points that will make the feature appeal and you 
can count on Dorothy Phillips pleasing them. 

The star is thoroughly convincing and sincere in 
her portrayal of the young actress who suffers the 
neglect and abuse of a drinking husband because she 
loves him and thinks he needs her. Kenneth Harlan 
hasn't a particularly pleasant role but he does good 
work. Harlan is certainly an unworthy husband in 
the role of Wallace Foster ; Bruce McRae is the other 
man who restrains his love for Foster's wife because 
he knows she still loves Wallace. Otis Harlan and 
Jack MacDonald try to ring a humorous touch now and 
then with their home-brewing facilities. MacDonald 
would have gotten along much better without the 
Keystone beard, however. 

Story : Jo Bishop gains fame in the "movies." She 
marries Wallace Foster while John Brand, also in 
love with her, remains a true friend. Wallace drinks 
heavily, mistreats and neglects Jo who strives in vain 
to be happy with Wallace. Eventually he accuses her 
of being in love with Brand and while trying to take 
her away, their machine goes off an open bridge. 
Wallace dying as a result and Jo is happy later with 
Brand. 



Propaganda In This That Should Do S ome Good 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Exhibitors will undoubtedly find that their folks will 
particularly relish this story of motion picture people, 
their work and their private lives. The public is al- 
ways on the alert for "inside information" and you can 
count on them liking the things that happen in "The 
World's a Stage." Let them know it is a story of 
moving picture people, how they live and how they 
work. That should be enough to get them interested. 



Of course, use Dorothy Phillips' name and let them 
know that she plays the part of a motion picture actress 
who suffers the neglect and abuse of her husband 
rather than divorce him and be happy with the man 
that really loves and respects her. It might help the 
industry in general to use the propaganda that this 
offers, in the right way — to assure folks that Holly- 
wood is not as it has sometimes been painted. 



CURRENT RELEASES 



Dave 



Footage Reviewed Release Date 



Footage Review 







AMERICAN RELEASING CORP. 

The Trail of the Axe (Dustin Farnum) 4,428 

The Mohican's Daughter 4,700 

The Danger Point 5.807 

The Marriage Chance 5,840 

The Challenge (Dolcres Cassinelli) 

When the Desert Calls (Violet Heming) 6,159 

What Fools Men Are 6.087 

The Super-Sex 5,749 

As a Man Lives 5,800 

Solomon in Society (Wm. H. Strauss) 6.000 

Milady 6,000 

That Woman 6,000 



ASSOCIATED EXHIBITORS, INC. 

(Distributed through Pathe) 

Till We Meet Again (Mae Marsh) 6,000 10-29-22 

The Woman Who Fooled Herself (May 

Allison) 5,401 11-12-22 

Breaking Home Ties 6,000 11-26 22 

Conquering the Woman (Florence Vidor) 5,887 12-17-22 

Head Hunters of the South Seas 5,000 1-21-23 

Playgoers Pictures, Inc. 

Face to Face , 4,587 10-1-22 

The Man She Brought Back 4,792 10-8 22 

FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY CORP. 

Dec. 4 Ebb Tide (Geo. Melford) 7,336 11-26-22 

11 Outcast (Elsie Ferguson 7,390 12-10-22 

18 Singed Wings (Stanlaws Prod.) 7,788 12- 3-22 

25 Back Home and Broke (Thos. Meighan) 7,841 12-31-22 

25 Daughter of Luxury (Agnes Ayres) 4,538 12-10-22 

Jan. 1 Kick In (Fitzmaurice Prod.) 7,074 12-24-22 

8 Thirty Days (Wallace Reid) 4,930 12-17-22 

15 The Enemies of Women (Cosmopolitan) 

22 Making a Man (Jack Holt) 5.S94 12-24-22 

22 Missing Millions (Alice Brady) 5,870 9-24-22 

29 The World's Applause (Wm. DeMille) 

Feb. 5 When Knighthood Was in Flower (M. Davies) 10,800 9-17-22 

5 Dark Secrets (Dorothy Dalton) 

12 My American Wife (Gloria Swanson) 6.061 1- 7-23 

19 Adam's Rib (Cecil DeMille) 

26 Drums of Fate (Mary Miles Minter) 5.716 1-21-23 

26 Nobody's Money (Jack Holt) 



FOX FILM CORP. 

Tom Mix Series 

Tom Mix in Arabia 4,400 

Catch My Smoke 4.070 12-31-22 

William Farnum 

Without Compromise 5,173 11 12-22 

Duitln Farnum 

While Justice Waits 4,762 11-26-22 

Three Who Paid 4,859 12-24-22 

Shirley Mason Series 

Shirley of the Circus 4,668 11 12-22 

Pawn Ticket 210 4,871 

William Ru.l.ll 

Mixed Faces 4.400 10-1-22 

Man's Size 4,316 12 17-22 

Charles Jones 

Boss of Camp 4 4,235 11-19-22 

The FootliK'hl Ranger 4,729 1-21-23 

John Gilbert 

Calvert's Valley 4,416 10 8-22 

The Love Gambler 4,682 11-5-22 

A California Romance 3,892 12-10-22 

Special 

The Village Blacksmith 7,000 1112-22 

The Town That Forgot God 10.613 1210 22 

Face on the Barroom Floor 5,785 1- 7-23 

A Friendlj Husband 4,527 1-14-23 

The Custard Cup (Mar> Carr) 6,166 1-21-23 



FIRST NATIONAL 

Skin Deep (Thos. H. Ince) 6,303 10-8-22 

The Bond Boy (Richard Barthelmess) 6,902 8-15-22 

Oliver Twist (Jackie Coogan) 7,600 11-5-22 

Brawn of the North 7,000 11-19-22 

The Pilgrim (Chas. Chaplin) 4,000 11-19-22 

White Shoulders (Katherinc MacDonald) 5,966 11-26-22 

Omar hte Tentmaker (Guy Bates Post) 8,000 12- 3-22 

Minnie (Neilan Prod.) 6,696 12- 3-22 

Lorna Doone 6,200 12-10-22 

The Hottentot 5,953 12-17-22 

Money, Money, Money (Katherine MacDonald).... 

GOLDWYN PICTURES 

Brothers Under the Skin 4,983 11-19-22 

Hungry Hearts 6,517 12-3-22 

A Blind Bargain 4,500 12-10-22 

Broken Chains 6,190 12-17-22 

The Strangers' Banquet (Marshall Neilan) 8,153 1- 7-23 

Gimme (Rupert Hughes) 5,769 1-21-23 

D. W. GRIFFITH, INC. 

One Exciting Night 1 1,000 10-29-22 

W. W. HODKINSON CORP. 

Maurice Tourneur Prod. 

While Paris Sleeps 4,850 1-21-23 

Victor Schertzinger Prod. 

Dollar Devils 6,000 

Tuttle-Waller Prod. 

Second Fiddle (Glenn Hunter) 5,810 1-14-23 

C. S. Clancy Prod. 

The Headless Horseman (Will Rogers) 6,000 10-22-22 

Rex Ingram Prod. 

Trifling Women 9,000 10-8-22 

Hollandia Film Corp. 

Bulldog Drummond 5,000 11-26-22 

Producers Security 

The Kingdom Within 6,063 12-24-22 

METRO PICTURES CORP. 

June Madness (Viola Dana) 6,000 10-1-22 

Youth to Youth (Biliie Dove) 6,603 10-29-22 

The Forgotten Law 6,000 10-22-22 

Enter Madame (Clara Kimball Young) 6,000 11-5-22 

Love in the Dark (Viola Dana) 6,000 11-19-22 

The Toll of the Sea 4,600 12-3-22 

Quincy Adams Sawyer 7,800 12- 3-22 

Peg O' My Heart (Laurette Taylor) 6,000 12-17-22 

Hearts Aflame 8,100 12-24-22 

All the Brothers Were Valiant 6,265 1-21-23 

Crinoline and Romance (Viola Dana) 6,000 

Rex Ingram Prod. 

Trifling Women 9,000 10-8-22 

PATHE EXCHANGE, INC. 

Dr. Jack (Harold Lloyd) 6,000 12-31-22 

PREFERRED PICTURES— AL LICHTMAN 

Shadows 5,000 11-5-22 

Thorns and Orange Blossome 6.971 11-26-22 

The Hero 6,800 1-14-23 

FILM BOOKING OFFICES CF AMERICA (R-C) 

If I Were Queen (Ethel Clayton) 5,955 10-22-22 

The Broadway Madonna (Dorothy Revier) 6,000 11-19-22 

Good Men and True (Harry Carey) 5,400 11-12-22 

Thelma (Jane Novak) 6,497 1 1-26-22 

When Love Comes 4,800 12-10-22 

Capt. Fly-By-Night 6,000 12-24-22 

The Third Alarm 6,757 1-14-23 

Canyon of the fools (Harry Carey) 6,000 



THE 



Sunday, January 28, 1923 

itt— —i inm— - — — "~ 



■s&n 



DAILY 



21 



Viola Dana Should Please As Hoop-Skirted Flapper 



Viola Dana in 

"CRINOLINE AND ROMANCE" 

Metro 

DIRECTOR Harry Beaumont 

AUTHOR Bernard McConville 

SCENARIO BY Bernard McConville 

CAMERAMAN John Arnold 

AS A WHOLE Pleasing comedy-drama that 

should go over well 

STORY Good entertainment with a little pathos 

and plenty of laughs. Plot a trifle far-fetched 

DIRECTION Very good; first few reels could 

be pepped up a little 

PHOTOGRAPHY Good 

LIGHTINGS Satisfactory 

STAR Very pleasing in quaint role of hoop- 
skirted girl of 1923 

SUPPORT Claude Gillingwater does very good 

work; John Bowers and Allan Forrest leading 
men ; others adequate but unimportant 

EXTERIORS Suitable, some very pretty 

shots 

INTERIORS Good 

DETAIL Ample 

CHARACTER OF STORY Girl kept in seclu- 
sion by grandfather runs away to fashionable 
aunt. Becomes a flapper but later returns to 
grandfather and marries 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 6,000 feet 

Viola Dana's latest Metro release should prove an 
entertaining offering for the average audience. It 
combines comedy that at times borders on the farcical 
with pathetic touches that get over in good shape and 
there is some sure fire comedy stuff that will bring 
spontaneous laughter. 

The plot centers around a situation which is fairly 
different. The star's admirers will undoubtedly be 



pleased with her characterization as the sweet, hoop- 
skirted Southern girl who has never been allowed to 
go outside of the beautiful valley in which her grand- 
father has reared her. The fact that this is a trifle far- 
fetched will not bother your folks overmuch if they do 
not take it too seriously, nor will the fact that she 
changes her mannerisms with her clothes. They may 
wonder a trifle at the finish, however, whether she 
stays in crinolines the rest of her life or goes back to 
flapper fashions. 

Some exceedingly funny complications ensue in the 
last reel when both lovers from the city follow Viola 
to her little valley and the old Colonel with true South- 
ern hospitality entertains them. Most humorous is 
the sequence in which both suitors take Viola riding. 
A bee-sting makes her mule run away and both lovers 
in their excitement mount the same horse. They 
finally rescue her only to drop her in an effort to carry 
her. This is the sort of thing Miss Dana does very 
well, and the situation is built up until laugh after 
laugh results. 

Claude Gillingwater is excellent as the old Colonel, 
and John Bowers and Allen Forrest do good work as 
the lovers. The cast also includes Betty Francisco, 
Mildred June, Lillian Lawrence, Gertrude Short, 
Lillian Leighton and others. 

Story : Emmy Lou, reared in seclusion and hoop- 
skirts in a deserted Southern valley by her grandfather, 
Col. Cavanaugh, runs away to a fashionable aunt and 
scores a hit with all the men, particularly Davis Jordan 
and Augustus Biddle. To make friends with the girls 
she bobs her hair and wears short skirts but returns 
to her granddaddy in crinoline as he is about to kill 
himself. Followed by Jordan and Biddle she cannot 
decide which she loves best until the Colonel stages a 
duel between the boys. The pistols aren't loaded — 
but Emmy doesn't know it and thus makes Jordan her 
choice. 



Pleasant Little Comedy-Drama That Should Go Over If Exploited 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 

"Crinoline and Romance" will undoubtedly satisfy haired flapper and then goes back to crinoline. Catch- 
your audience, particularly if Viola Dana is a favorite. ij nes cou id be used to good advantage and you can tell 



The title will probably interest the girls and women 



them that in spite of a long-sleeved bathing suit, she 



and you can promise an interesting little story with 

some good laughs. You can interest them by telling beats them a11 in swimming. 

them that the hoop-skirted maid becomes a bobbed- star's name and tell them about the supporting cast. 



Date 



Footage Renewed 



LEWIS J. SELZNICK ENT. 

SeUnick Picture* (Distributed by Select Exchanges) 
Elaine Hammer stein Star Series 

Under Oath 5,000 

Bugcue O'Brien Star Series 

The Prophet's Paradise 

Channing of the Northwest 5,000 

Special Productions 

One Week of Love 7.000 11-12-22 

UNITED ARTISTS 

The Man Who Played God (Geo. Arliss) 5,810 10-8-22 

A Tailor-Made Man (Charles Ray) 8,469 10-22-22 

Robin Hood (Douglas Fairbanks) 11,000 11-5-22 

Tess of the Storm Country (Mary Pickford) .. .9,000 11-19-22 
Allied Prod. & Dist. Corp. 

A Woman's Woman 7.892 10-8-22 

Salome (Nazimova) 5,000 1- 7-23 

, , „ UNIVERSAL FILM MFG. CO. 

Jewel Features 

Under Two Flags (Priscilla Dean) 7,407 10-1-22 

The Kentucky Derby 5,398 10-22-22 

The Flirt 8,000 12-31-22 

The Flame of Life (Priscilla Dean) 5,776 1-14-23 

Universal Features 

The Girl Who Ran Wild (Gladys Walton) ... .4,506 10-1-22 

The Long Chance 4,836 10-1-22 

Wolf Law (Frank Mayo) 4,465 10-22-22 

Another Man's Shoes (Herbert Rawlinson) .. .4,700 11-5-22 

Broad Daylight 4,961 10-29-22 

The Lavender Bath Lady (Gladys Walton) 4,113 11-12-22 

The Jilt (All-Star) 4,491 11-26-22 

The Altar Stairs (Frank Mayo) 4,641 12- 3-22 

Ridin' Wild (Hoot Gibson) 4,166 11-19-22 

Forsaking All Others 4,462 12-10-22 

One Wonderful Night (Herbert Rawlinson) 4,473 12-17-22 

The Flaming Hour (Frank Mayo) 4,508 12,31,22 

A Dangerous Game (Gladys Walton) 

The Power of a Lie 4,910 1- 7-23 

The Scarlet Car (Herbert Rawlinson) 

Kindled Courage (Hoot Gibson) 

The Ghost Patrol 4,228 1-21-23 

VITAGRAPH 

Super-Features 

The Ladder Jinx 6,000 10-15-22 

The Ninety and Nine 6,800 12-17-22 

A Front Page Story 6,000 12-17-22 

Antonio Moreno 

A Guilty Conscience 

Alice Joyce 

The Inner Chamber 5,951 

William Duncan 

Where Danger Smiles 5,000 

WARNER BROS. 

Rags to Riches (Wesley Barry) 7,209 10-1-22 

The Beautiful and Damned 7,000 12-17-22 

Heroes of the Street (Wesley Barry) 7,000 12-24-22 

SHORT REEL RELEASES 

ASSOCIATED EXHIBITORS, INC. 

Harold Lloyd Comedies 

ASSOCIATED PRODUCERS, INC. 

Mack Sennet Comedies (2 reels) 
Ben Turpin Comedies (2 reels) 

EDUCATIONAL FILM CORP. OF AMERICA 

Sehg-Pork- Photoplays (2 reels) 

Mermaid Comedies (2 reels) 

Chester Comedies (2 reels) 

Torchy Comedies (2 reels) 

Christie Comedies (2 reels) 

Vanity Comedies (1 reel) 

Gayety Comedies (1 reel) 

Educational Specials: The Race of the Age (Man O' War), 2 reels; Art 

of Diving (Kellerman), 1 reel; Babe Ruth— How he Knocks 

His Home Run, 1 reel; Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, 1 reel; 

Modern Centaurs, 1 reel. 
Bruce Scenics Beautiful (1 reel) 
Chester Outings (1 reel) 
Chester Screenics (1 reel) 
Miscellaneous (1 reel): Could Columbus Discover America, The Crater 

of Mt. Katmai, Dexie. 
Sketchografs (1 reel) 
Punch Comedies (2 reels) 
Campbell Comedies (2 reels) 
Cinal Films (slow speed) 
Lyman Howe's Hodge Podge (1 reel) 
Cameo Comedies (1 reel) 
Tony Sorg Almanac (1 reel) 
Hamilton Comedies (2 reels) 
Earl Hurd, Comedies (1 reel) 

FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY 

Paramount-Burton Holmes Travel Pictures (1 reel): 

Paramount-Burlingame Adventure Scenics (1 reel) 

Paramount-De Haven Comedies (2 reels) 

Paramount-Mack Sennett Comedies (2 reels) 

Paramount Magazine (1 reel): Pictionary and Cartoons (weekly). 

Paramount-Post Nature Pictures (1 reel) 

Paramount-Vandenbergh Series (2 recl*> 



FIRST NATIONAL EXHIBITORS 

Charles Chaplin (2 and 3 reels) 
Toonerville Trolley (2 reels) 
Henry Lehnnan Comedies (2 reals) 
Buster Keevon Comedies (2 reels) 

FOX FILM CORPORATION 

Sunshine Comedies (2 reels) 

Clyde Cook Comedies (2 reels) 

Mutt and JeS Animated Cartoons (1 reel) 

Fox News (Twice a Week). 

Serials: Bride 13 (15 episodes), Fantomas (20 episodes). 

Educational Entertainments (la week) 

Educational Entertainments (1 a week) 

GOLDWYN PICTURES 

Capitol Comedies (2 reels) 
Edgar Comedies (2 reels) 
Goldwyn-Bray Comedies (1 reel) 
Goldwyn-Bray Pictographs (1 reel) 
Sport Review (1 reel) 

W. W. HODKINSON CORP. 

The Beggar Maid (Mary Aster) (2 reels) 

The Bashful Suitor (2 reels) 

The Young Painter (Mary Astor) 

Hope (Mary Astor) 

Charles Urban's Movie Chats 

Wonders of the World (2 serials) ; First Series from No. 1 to 
No. 26 (each 1 reel) ; Second Series from No. 27 to No. S3 
(each 1 reel). 

The Four Seasons (4 reels). 

PATHE EXCHANGE, INC. 

The Timber Queen (Serial) 

Roach 1 reel comedies 

Aesop Fables, 2/3 reel cartoons 

Harold Lloyd re-issues 

Pathe Playlets, 3 reel re-issues 

Pathe Review, 1 reel educational 

Topics of the Day, 1/3 reel 

Pathe News, twice a week 

Topics of the Day — 1 a week. 

LEWIS J. SELZNICK ENTERPRISES 

Herbert Kaufman Masterpieces. 

William J. Flynn Series (Detective Series, 2 reels). 

Chaplin Classics. 

S el 7. nick News. 

Serials: The Whirlwind (15 episodes), The Branded Four (15 episode*). 

UNIVERSAL FILM MFG. CO. 

Century Comedies (2 reels) 

Jewel Comedies — Ted Rider Series (Leonard Clapham) (2 reels) 

Serials: The Flaming Disk, 18 episodes; The Vanishing Dagger, 18 epi- 
sodes; The Dragon's Net, 15 episodes; King of the Circus (Ed- 
die Polo), — 'episodes; The Diamond Queen (Eileen Sedgwick), 
— episodes; The White Horsemen, 18 episodes; Do or Die (Ed- 
die Polo), — episodes; Terror Trail, — episodes. 

Star Comedies (1 reel) 

Western and Railroad Dramas (2 reels) (Hoot Gibson, Jack Perrin, KUeea 
Sedgwick) 

Star Comedies (1 reel) : When Eve Fell, No License (Billy Fletcher), 

VITAGRAPH 

Big V Special Comedies (2 reels) 
Larry Semon Comedies (2 reels) 
Jim Aubrey Comedies (2 reels) 

KINETO CO. OF AMERICA 
(Released through National Exchange) 

Kineto Review (The Living Book of Knowledge). 

Second Series (1 reel): Was Darwin Right? Bonnie Scotland, Bird* of 
Crags and Marshes, Village Life in Switzerland, Peculiar Pet*, 
Combatting the Elements, Dexterity and Mimicry of InaMt*. 
Primitive Life in Tennessee, Bear Hunting in California, Pari* 
the Beautiful, A Naturalist's Paradise, Morocco the Mysterious, 
Let's See the Animals. 

LEVEY, HARRY, ENTERPRISES 

Electricity — -It's Development. 

Motor Efficiency — Its History 
Electricity in the Motor Vehicle. 

NATIONAL EXCHANGES, INC. 

Serial: The Great Reward (Francis Ford and Ella Hall). 
Comedies: King Cole Comedies (Bobby Burns). 
Kineto Review (Chas. Urban) (1 reel), issued weekly. 

PRIZMA, INCORPORATED 

26 Short Subject Color Picture* 
"Heidi of the Alps" (2 reels) 
"Bali, the Unknown' (5 reels) 
Short Keel Music Filna Protect 



Short Stuff 



"Peg O' the Movies" — Century — Universal 
Type of production 2 reel kid comedy 

Those who have been anxious to see Baby Peggy will be 
glad to see lh:s one which is the first of a series of six two- 
reelers featuring the tiny star that Century is releasing. The 
plot is light ai.d should of course not be taken seriously, but 
Peggy is there in fifty different ways. The women folk will 
just love her. She is first seen traveling to Universal City in 
a hammock slung under a freight car from which she emerges 
dressed like a little Bill Hart. The first thing she does is 
throw a brick at what she thinks is a thief, thus spoiling a 
perfectly good scene that a director is making. After many 
troubles she finally gets her "chance" and telling the director 
"you ain't seen nothing yet," proceeds to go all the vamps of 
moviedom one better in the famous "Fool There Was." If 
they like Baby Peggy — and how can they help it — go ahead 
with this. 



"Hearts of Oak"— Timber Tales— Universal 
Type of production 2 reel drama 

"Hearts of Oak," another of the Timber Tale series featur- 
ing Roy Stewart, has been directed by Duke Worne from a 
scenario by Harvey Gates. There is plenty of thrill in this 
little two-reeler and the action doesn't stop for a minute. 
Joseph Girard is in the cast and Vera Reynolds is the girl. 
This time Stewart as the ever-busy official of the Government 
Forestry Service in addition to putting out a small-sized forest 
fire, fighting several lumber thieves and rescuing the girl from 
a runaway lumber flat-car, wins a wife in the bargain. 



Starland Review No. 19 — Film Booking Office 

Type of production 1 reel novelty 

There are a number of interesting glimpses of stage per- 
formers in this latest review that will make it a good number 
for houses where the people have a chance to know the players 
presented, through either vaudeville or legitimate shows that 
play the town. It includes Sally, the monkey featured in 
Ziegfeld Follies; Mosconi brothers, members of the dancing 
family; Henry Hull and John Willard, star and author re- 
spectively of "The Cat and the Canary"; the Bennett sisters, 
dancers in the Boardwalk, a Broadway restaurant; also the 
Du Val sisters of "The Hotel Mouse" and the McCarthy sis- 
ters of "The Music Box Review"; a scene from "The Love 
Child" and interesting views of W. T. Benda, creator of the 
famous Benda masks. 



"A Tough Winter"— Hal Roach— Pathe 

Type of production 2 reel comedy 

Snub Pollard with Marie Mosquini, directed by Charles Par- 
rott, tries very hard to make this comedy a winner. In the 
first reel Snub's difficulties with a straw hat and palm beach 
suit in the midst of a terrible blizzard serves as a peg on which 
to hang the different gags. He finally adopts a newsgirl, 
Marie Mosquini, and her little brother, and plays Santa Claus 
by dropping down the chimney with a bag of firecrackers. A 
mean landlord seeking rent complicates matters and the trio 
take a train to Florida. But by mistake the train goes to 
Iceland and the second reel, in an effort to travesty "Nanook," 
has some really funny stuff. 



"Smoked Out"— Range Rider— Pathe 
Type of production 2 reel western 

Written and directed by Ford Beebe and the hero, Leo Ma- 
loney, "Smoked Out" offers good entertainment for those who 
like this sort of stuff. The chase, generally used to good ad- 
vantage in other offerings of this series, is eliminated in this 
one, but there is plenty of fist fighting to make up for it. 
Maloney, rescuing a man who has been wounded and robbed, 
takes him back to his aged sick mother who has not seen her 
son for years. Leaving the sick man in the barn, Maloney 
goes to the house to explain. The mother is overjoyed to see 
him, thinking he is her son and he permits her to believe it 
until she falls asleep. The villain who robbed her son re- 
turns to pose as the long lost brother, with an eye on the 
promising ranch, but after difficulties in which Maloney is 
found to be an impostor, and the villain sets fire to the barn, 
the real son is identified by his signature. The cast includes 
Bud Osborne, Pat Rooney, Ray Meyers and Pauline Curley. 



"Fruits of Faith"— Will Rogers— Pathe 
Type of production 3 reel comedy drama 

This three reel Will Rogers picture offers a lot more enter- 
tainment and real amusement than many of the so-called feat- 
ures. It is Rogers at his best in the role of a tramp and it is 
easy to guess the rest if you've once seen Rogers in one of his 
typical hobo parts. Will is a "son of rest" who gets an inspi- 
ration from a traveling person. The preacher's text is "faith" 
and he promises his hearers that they may have anything they 
want merely by having faith. Will immediately asks "faith" to 
send him something to eat. How he gets it, along with many 
other wishes, is only the beginning of this interesting number. 
Later on there is considerable sentiment in connection with 
Will's adoption of a babe he finds in the desert. Irene Rich and 
a cute baby are Rogers' chief support. "Fruits of Faith" is a 
thoroughly worth while addition for any program. 



"Down in Dixie" — Mutt and Jeff— Fox 
Type of production 1 reel cartoon 

There are a few laughs in this latest Mutt and Jeff, but the 
material isn't nearly as funny as some of the subjects Fox has 
previously turned out. Mutt and Jeff invent a machine into 
which the cotton is thrown direct from the field. The remark- 
able feature of the machine is that it turns out ready made 
clothes. There is the usual line of behavior on the part of the 
little fellow and his big partner but "Down in Dixie" is shy 
on laughs. 



"A Raisin and a Cake of Yeast"— Aesop's Fable— Pathe 
Type of production 1 reel cartoon 

This is a particularly good number of this series, the ideas 
incorporated being clever and the animation smooth. A little 
rabbit is chased by furious bloodhounds into a cave. Escap- 
ing, he is found by Farmer Al Falfa who gives him a drink 
of his home brew which has such an effect that the rabbit is 
next seen throwing one of the hounds around his head by his 
tail. Farmer Al next gives a rooster a drink which blows all 
his feathers off. Then he takes a drink himself and the "kick" 
he gets out of it takes him among the stars. The moral of 
which is (for some unknown reason), "There is nothing like 
travel to broaden one." 



INDEPENDENT FEATURES 



Keie... Date Footage Reviewed 

ARROW FILM CORP. 

Peaceful Peters (Wm. Fairbanks) 5,000 10 , 29 /22 

Another Man's Boots (Francis Ford) 5,000 \\'\'ii 

Unconquered (Maciste) 6.500 \\b-i£ 

L. LAWRENCE WEBER & BOBBY NORTH 

Notoriety 7.000 10-8-22 

AYWON FILM CO. 

Thundering Hoofs (Peggy O'Day) 5,000 10-15-22 

Another Man a Booti (Francia Ford) 5,000 

B. B. PRODUCTIONS 

The Darling of the Rich (Betty Blythe) 6,000 1-14-23 

C. B. C. FILM SALES CORP. 

Only a Shop Girl 6,400 12-24-22 

DEPENDABLE SALES CORP. 

Dri'en (Chas. Brabin Prod.) 5,540 11-26-22 

GENIUS FILMS INC. 

Women Men Marry 5,986 10-29-22 

PHIL GOLDSTONE 

Deserted at the Altar 7.000 10-1-22 

Wildcat Jordan (Richard Talmadge) 5.000 10-29-22 

HOWELLS SALES CO. 

Her Royal Love - ^^~ 

Sold For a Million 

Count Cagliostro 

A Daughter of Eve 

INDEPENDENT PICTURES CORP. 

The Devil's Partner 5,000 - — 

The Valley of Lost Souls 5.000 

Flames of Passion 5,000 1-14-23 

The Power Divine 5,000 - — 

The Way of the Transgressor 5,000 

A Child of the Gods 5,000 — 

The Mine Looters 5,000 — 

LEE & BRADFORD 

The Unconquered Woman (Rubye de Remer) 

Flesh and Spirit t Belle Bennett) 

Sally 

Branded (Josephine Earle) 

Serving Two Masters (Josephine Earle) 

x he Way of a Man (Josephine Earle) 

Cloudburst (All Star) 

MASTER PICTURES 

Secrets of Paris 6,800 10-29-22 

MASTODON FILMS INC. 

Sure Fire Flint 6,400 10-29-22 

The Last Hour (Edw. Sloman) '..6,929 1- 7-23 

PRINCIPAL PICTURES 

Environment 5,700 12-24-22 

PRODUCERS SECURITY CORP. 

Squire Phin (Maclyn Arbuckle) 5,000 

The Soul of Man 6,000 

The Right Way 6.000 

Welcome to Our City (Maclyn Arbuckle) 5,000 

Mr. Bingle 5,000 

Mr. Potter of Texas 6,000 

Trail of the Law 5,000 

The Country Flapper (Dorothy Gish) 5,000 8-13-22 

The Wolf's Fangs (Wilfred Lytell) 5,000 

In the Night (All-Star) 5,000 

SANFORD PRODUCTIONS 

The Better Man Wins (Pete Morrison) 5,000 10-22-22 

WM. STEINER 

Table Top Ranch 5,000 11-12-22 

TRI-STAR PICTURES CO. 

Fruits of Passion (Alice Mann & Donald Hall).. 5,000 

Water Lilv (Alice Mann & Donald Hall) 5.000 

Dazzling Miss Davidson (Marjorie Ramheau) . .5.000 

How a Woman Loves (Marjorie Rambeau) ...5.000 

Sht Paid (Marjorie Rambeau) 5 000 

Mn. Belfame (Nance O'Neil) 5.000 

UNITY PICTURES 

Why Do Men Marry 5,000 9-17-22 

WILLIAMSON PROD. 

Wonders of the Sea 4,300 10-29-22 



SHORT REELS-STATE RIGHTS 

ADVENTURES OF T. S. S. CORP. 

Adventures of Tarzan (Elmo Lincoln), 15 episodes. 

ALLIED DISTRIBUTING CORP. 

Alt & Howell Comedies (12 2-reels), Pure and Simple (2 reels), Liquoriai 
Lips (2 reels). 

ARROW FILM CORP. 

Tex Detective Series. 

Arrow-Hank Mann Comedies: One every other week (2 reels). 

Blazed Trail Productions: One every other week (2 reels). 

Arrow-Northwood Dramas (2 reels) : Looking Up Jim, In the Riv«r, 

Three and a Girl, Raiders of the North, A Knight of the Pines. 

The Man of Brawn, The Strangers, Breed of the North, A Fight 

foi a Soul, Beloved Brute, Quicksands, Border River. 
Spotlight Comedies (2 reels) : Champion by Chance, Soap Bubbles, H«i 

Husband's Flat, His Wife Jimmy. 
Ardath XLNT Comedies (2 reels): Wild Women and Tame Men, The 

Village Grocer, Homer Joins the Force. 
Serials: Thunderbilt Jack (Jack Hoxie), 15 episodes. 

AYCIE PICTURES CORP. 

Success Series: 15 Westerns (each 2 reels). 

AYWON FILM CORP. 

Harry Carey: IS Westerns (each 2 reels). 
Joy Comedies: 6 (each 2 reels). 
Franklin Farnum: 12 Westerns (2 reels). 
Helen Holmes: 22 Railroad Dramas (2 reels). 
Mary Pickford Revivals. 

C. B. C. FILM SALES 
Star Ranch Westerns (2 reels). 
Screen Snapshots (Bi-monthly) (1 reel). 
Hall Room Boy Comedies (2 reels twice a month). 
Sunbeam Comedies (Billy West) (2 reels) 
Cap'n Kidd (Eddie Polo) serial 

CELEBRATED PLAYERS 

Gump (1 reel each). 

Celebrated Comedies (1 reel each). 

CLARION PHOTOPLAYS, INC. 

The Expose of Sawing a Lady in Half (2 reels) 

DOMINANT PICTURES, INC. 

Western Star Dramas (2 reels). 

EXPORT AND IMPORT FILM CO. 

Serial: The Jungle Goddess (Truman Van Dyke and Elinore Field), IS 
episodes 

FEDERATED FILM EXCHANGE 

Monty Banks Comedies (2 reels) : Nearly Married, Kidnapper's Revenge. 
A Bedroom Scandal, Where Is My Wife? His First Honeymoon, 
Br'de and Gloom, In and Out, His Dizzy Day. 

Hallroom Boy Comedies (2 reels) : False Roomers, Their Dizzy Finish. 
Circus Heioes. 

Ford Weekly. 

Serial: Miracles ot the Jungle, 15 episodes. 

FILM MARKET, INC. 

limmy Callahan, 12 2 reels 

GAUMONT COMPANY 

News (every Tuesday) ; Graphic (every Friday). 

Serials: In the Clutches of the Hindoo (19,089 feet), 10 episodes. 

HERALD PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

Mack Swain Comedies (2 reels) : Moonlight Knight, Full of Spirit, See 
America First. 

HORIZON PICTURES, INC. 

Norma Talmadge Reissues (fourteen) (each 2 reels). 

INDEPENDENT PICTURES CORP. 

Nick Carter Series (2 reels — 10 a month). 
Favorite Star Series (2 reel dramas — 10 a month). 

JOAN FILM SALES CO. 
Invisible Ray Series: Ruth Clifford and Jack Sheril (15 episodes) 31,000 
feet) ; (2 reels) : Sweethearts, Service Stripes, He'a In Again, 
The Conquering Hero. 

LEE & BRADFORD 
Squirrel Comedies 
Canadian Travelogues 

PINNACLE COMEDIES 
(2 reels): Razzin' the Jazz, Why Change Your Mother in Law? Nation's 
Dream, Shimmy Isle 

PLYMOUTH PICTURES 
Series of 5 two-reel Mrs. Roscoe Arbuckle Comedies 
Series of 12 one-reel Denver Dixon Comedies 

PACIFIC FILM COMPANY 

White Cap Comedies: Featuring George Ovey (Once-a-week) (1 reel). 
Newspaper Stories: Featuring Irene Hunt (Two-a-month) (2 reels). 
Vernon Dent Comedies: One-a-week (1 reel). 

PIONEER FILM CORP. 

The Facts and Follies Series (1 reel) 

Luke McLuke's Film-Osophy. each J4 reel. 

The Sonny Series, each 2 reels. 

Serial — The Hope Diamond Mvstery (IS episodes). 

PRODUCERS SECURITY CORPORATION 

Irving Cumminprs Series 2,000 — 

Cissy Fitzgerald 2,000 

SACRED FILMS, INC. 

Sacred Films (1 reel) 

STOREY PICTURES, INC. 

Shadowland Screen Review (1 reel a week) 
Federated Screen Review (1 reel everv 2 weeks) 
Burlesque Photoplays (2 reels a month) 
Shadowlafs (1 reel everv 2 weeks) 
Kidkomedies (1 a month) 
Al Haynes Comedies (1 reel every 2 weeks) 






— 



STUDIO FOR SALE 



25 Minutes from Times Square. 



Every Modern device. Must be 
Sold at once. Producers should 
investigate this proposition. Terms 
can be arranged for responsible 



parties. 



Address: R-291 
care of Film Daily 



I I lIlllllililll llllllllllll l'lllllllllllllliillllllllllillllllllllllllilMM i 



M 







Year Book 

1922-23 



Out Wednesday, January 31st 



If your copy does not arrive 
promptly advise immediately 



Price $2.50 (to non-subscribers) 



i 



7Ao brAdstreet 

of FILMDOM 




ZfcRECOGNIZE* 

Authority 



ol. XXIII No. 28 



Monday, January 29, 1923 



Price 5 Cents 



Carlos' Plans 

sported He Will Produce Working 

Co-operatively With Woman's 
Home Companion 
Reports are in circulatior that Abe 
irlos, for many years the right 
,nd man of William Fox, will take 
er the production of material with 
nich the Woman's Home Com- 
mon will work co-operatively. 
These reports could not be verified 
i Saturday. Alexander Film, which 

handling the distribution of some 
'o reelers, based on stories from 
at publication, stated that there was 

be no changes in the existing dis- 
ibution, and no one could be found 

admit the veracity of the report. 
It is said, however, that Carlos has 
cured headquarters at 1650 Broad- 
ly, and will shortly open offices, and 
at plans are well under way for 
irlos to take over the production of 
I material mentioned; and that 
ese plans call not only for two 
elers, but in all probability, feature 
lgth productions as well. 
Carlos has long been a very im- 
rtant figure in the Fox organization. 
is long training has acquainted him 
th a thorough knowledge of every 
anch of the industry. 



Max Reinhardt Coming Here 

The early arrival of Max Reinhardt 
this country is indicated by the 
:t that Max Ree, associated with 
n as artist, has already reached 
:w York. The German producer 
coming here to produce plays with 
nerican casts, and perhaps do some 
:ture work. 



$280,000 Sought in Damages 
(.Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Washington — Representatives of 
: estates of the 28 victims of the 
lickerbocker theater disaster have 
tituted suit against the Knicker- 
cker Theater Co., of which Harry 
Crandall for $280,000 of $10,000 
each of the victims. The District 
Columbia law is such that suits of 
s nature cannot be filed until a 
ir after the deaths occurred. 



Stanlaws Plans Two a Year 
Penrhyn Stanlaws who recently 
npleted his contract with Famous 
iyers, is in New York from the 
ist. He plans to make two pic- 
es a year from now on. and bi- 
ds starting work about June, fol- 
ding a trip to Europe- He admit- 
on Saturday that he is entertain- 
an offer from one distributor, but 
lied that he was affiliated with 
ied Authors, the Woods, Buchan- 
Harris organization, as reported. 




"Dollar Devils," Victor Schertzinger's second picture for HodMnson re- 
lease is a corker. Cullen Landis, Eva Novak and Joseph Dowling make 
this story of an oil boom in a small town fairly sizzle with excitement, 
laughter and human interest. A Hodkinson picture that is better than 80% 
of the pictures released today. — Advt. 



That Deal 

Ten years ago, a young trade paper writer gave Sol Lesser 
the title of "Little Napoleon." Today, those familiar with 
ancient history, might compare him with Alexander who "sighed" 
because there were no more nations to conquer. And perhaps 
Lesser hasn't "sighed." Perhaps he is only just beginning. 

This is certain. No other move in the picture industry has 
brought such a feeling as the announcement that Lesser and 
his associates had taken over the T & D California circuit, which 
carried with it an 80 per cent interest in the New York franchise 
of First National. 

The West Coast Theaters, with which the T & D will be 
amalgamated, has developed rapidly under the management of 
Lesser, Mike and Abe Gore and Adolph Ramish. In distributing 
circles, the West Coast Theaters organization has received the 
dignity of being classified among other circuits which pay as 
little as possible for pictures. By securing T & D and extending 
i heir bookings to practically 150 days, for all practical purposes 
Lesser becomes the boss of the West Coast. 

Famous Players have attempted to secure the T & D circuit 
and franchise, and naturally, First National officials are satisfied. 
But otherwise the distribution field generally when apprised of 
the report, used expressions which for various reasons are not 
presented herewith. 

When, in addition to the exhibition activities of the Lesser 
group, it is borne in mind that only recently, Lesser announced 
the enlargenn nt of his production activities, the move becomes 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Schenck Busy 

Reported After Valentino to Appear 

With Norma Talmadge in 

"Romeo and Juliet" 

E. V. Durling says in the Globe: 
"Joe Schenck is doing his best to 
persuade his old friend Adolph Zukor 
to transfer the services of Rodolph 
Valentino to him, and for a very 
good reason. Mr. Schenck has set 
his heart on having Rodolph and Nor- 
ma Talmadge appear in 'Romeo and 
Juliet.' Inasmuch as Joe is noted 
for running more or less wild with 
his bankroll when there is something 
he wants there is a possibility we 
may yet see Rodolph and Norma on 
the balcony. 

"If Rodolph would even go so far 
as to let bygones be bygones and 
walk over to Mr. Zukor's Fifth 
Avenue office, the possibilities of the 
aforementioned picture being made 
would be very great. It seems that 
Mr. Valentino and Mr. Zukor are in 
the position of quarrelling children. 
Neither will speak first." 



There was an important conference 
of principals early last week regard- 
ing a settlement of the Valentino- 
Famous Players controversy. Noth- 
ing occurred and the situation re- 
mains unchanged. 

Arthur Butler Graham, Valentino's 
attorney, had no comment to make 
on the Globe report. Adolph Zukor 
could not be reached. 



Lasky Signs Moreno 

Jesse L. Lasky has signed Antonio 
Moreno for five years to play leads. 



Wilcox Arrives from London 

Charles Wilcox of Graham-Wilcox 
Prod., arrived on the Berengaria 
from London on Saturday. His com- 
pany will produce "Loyalties" and 
"Chu Chin Chow." Wilcox's trip is 
to dispose of American rights to 
"Flames of Passion" and "Paddy- 
The-Next-Best-Thing." 



Future Talmadge Productions 
Norma Talmadge's next picture 
will be "Ashes of Vengeance," a cos- 
tume play which Frank Lloyd will 
direct. Constance will next do 
"Dulcy," under the direction of 
Sydney Franklin. Later Constance 
will appear in a story laid in 
Napoleonic times. Joseph Schenck 
has signed Victor Hccrman for one 
year am! lias also engaged Willard 
Mack, who will supervise both pro- 
duction units. 



THE 



i&ak 



DAILY 



Monday, January 29, 1923 




Vol. XXIII No. 78 Monday, Jan. 29. 19?3 Price 5 Cents 



Copyright 1923, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 
J. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager ; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
•t the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Bollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 
Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
Paris Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau, Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
vakia), Wenzelsplatz. 



Hugh Cardoza Dead 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Atlanta — Hugh Cardoza, veteran 
showman died here last week. 




On Broadway 

Astor— "The Third Alarm." 
Broadway — "The Stranger's Ban- 
quet." 
Brooklyn Strand — "Omar the Tent- 
maker." 
Cameo — "One Million in Jewels." 
Capitol— "Robin Hood." 
Criterion — "Poor Men's Wives." 
Loew's New York — Today — "Dr. 
Jack." 
Tuesday — "Catch My Smoke" and 

"The Pauper Millionaire." 
Wednesday — "Thirty Days." 
Thursday — "The Kingdom With- 
in." 
Friday— "The Veiled Adventure." 

and "The Ghost Patrol." 
Saturday— "Captain Fly-By-Night." 
Sunday — "One Week of Love." 
Lyric — "Hunting Big Game in 

Africa." 
Rialto — "Nobody's Money." 
Rivoli — "World's Applause." 
Strand— "The Dangerous Age." 



Next Week 

Astor— "The Third Alarm." 
Broadway — Not yet determined. 
Brooklyn Strand — "The Dangerous 

Age." 
Cameo — Not yet determined. 
Hood." 

Men's Wives." 
Big Game in 



Capitol — "Robin 
Criterion — "Poor 
Lyric — "Hunting 

Africa." 
Rialto — Not yet determined. 
Rivoli — Not yet determined. 
Strand — "The Voice From the 

aret." 



Min- 



Balshofer Plans Series 
Fred J. Balshofer left for the coast 
yesterday to get a 
westerns under way 
will be featured. 



new series of 

Fred Church 



Australia Proves Good Customer 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Washington — November exports 
included 12.604,101 ft. of positive, 
valued at $510,980; 328.122 ft. of 
negative, valued at $40,937; and 
3,102,148 ft. of sensitized, but not ex- 
posed film, valued at $83,676. The 
most important markets were as fol- 
lows: Positives, Australia, with im- 
$71,304; negatives, England, with im- 
ports of 202,203 ft., valued at $33,327; 
sensitized, Japan, with imports of 
1,050,389 ft., valued at $29,102. 



(Quotations 

High Low Close Sales 

East. Kod. 96 96 96 310 

F. P.-L. . . 85 84J4 84K 300 

do pfd. . 96^ 96 96^ 400 

'wyn ... 6J4 5Vs $% 1,300 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's ... 19K 18& 19J4 3,300 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 



bite?- national Distributers- pf 
MOTION 'PICTURES ' 



Inter-Ocean Film Corporation? t 



I N T E R-O CEAN B UJLQ&l£ 

218 WEST 42nd ST;'/"' VNVIW.XOKK 

BRYANT 7812 :."' 

WHEN YOU THIN'k\C*F' 
" FOREIGN THINK" OF 

■I NT E R-O; CEAN 



SIMPLEX TITLE SHOP 

220 W. 42nd St. 
Announces the closing of a contract 
giving it exclusive sales rights on the 

FAMOUS STONE LIBRARY 
Over two million feet of selected shots 
as far back as 1897, negative and posi- 
tive, are now made available for your 
requirements. 

Phone Bryant 0984-0985 



Have Your Titles 

Made the Right Way 
Quality — Quantity 
24 hour Service 

FARINA & OGLE 

Title Photographers 

At Claremont Laboratories 

430 Claremont Parkway 

Tel. Bingham 2100 



mm 



vmmMmm& 



Commercial Developing and Printing 



'^ffiSpaipp^p^i 



1339-51 DtVEPSEY PARKWAY- CHICAGO. U.S.A. 



THE SUPER 39 



DOROTHY DALTON 



in 



(< 



The Law of the Lawless 



No. 19 



99 



with THEODORE KOSLOFF and CHARLES DE ROCHE 

From the Pictorial Review story by Konrad Bercovici 
Scenario by E. Lloyd Sheldon and Edfrid Bingham Directed by Victor Fleming 



Released April 15th 



A 



STORY of primitive people and ele- 
mental emotions, unusual in setting 
The story ran in the Pictorial 
two and a half million circula- 



and in story. 
Review, with 
tion. 



No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



"Dark Secrets." 
"My American Wife." 
"Drums of Fate." 
"Nobody's Money." 
"Adam's Rib." 
"Java Head." 
"The White Flower." 
"Adam and Eva.'' 




FAMOUS PLAYERS 

AOOLPI 



RS L\SKY CORPORATION?^ 

ih zuuon 0~.....l , Lg 



Charles de Roche, the famous French star, 
makes his first American appearance in this. 
Theodore Kosloff is featured, and others in 
the cast are Tully Marshall, Fred Huntley 
and Margaret Loomii. 



No. 10 "Racing Hearts" 

No 11 "The Nth Commandment" 

No. 12 "Mr. Billings Spends His Dime" 

No. 13 "The Glimpses of the Moon." 

No. 14 "The Leopardess." 

No. 15 "Bella Donna." 

No. 16 "Grumpy." 

No. 17 "The Go-Getter." 

No. IS "Prodigal Daughters." 




■ 



(2 Gpara mount Cpkiure 



WATCH THIS 

SPACE 

TOMORROW 

FOR 

No. 20 



MOTION PICTURE ARTS Inc. 

SECURES CONTRACT 

AND 

IS NOW PRODUCING THE 

ONL Y A UTHORIZED 

SCREEN STORY WITH 

Monsieur Emile Coue 

THE MOST TALKED OF MAN IN THE WORLD 

PERSONALLY 

DELIVERING HIS 

MESSAGE 

TO THE MILLIONS OF PIGTURE-LOVING FOLK EVERYWHERE 

JOHN L McCUTCHEON 

HAS BEEN SELECTED TO DIRECT THIS PRODUCTION WHICH 
WILL CARRY THE MESSAGE WHICH CIVILIZATION HAS SO 

EAGERLY RECEIVED. 



us, 



M. COUE Said to ELMORE LEFFINGWELL, writer and publicist 

"YOU KNOW MY STORY! TELL IT TO 
THE WORLD, FOR THE GOOD IT MAY DO!" 

AND 

LEWIS ALLEN BROWNE 

ADAPTED THE STORY TO THE SCREEN 



SCHUYLER E. GREY, production manger, arranged with 
JAMES S.BROWN Jr. and a staff of four cameramen than 

WHOM THERE ARE NONE MORE SKILLFUL, TO PHOTOGRAPH 
THE THEME THAT HAS ELECTRIFIED THE THINKING WORLD! 

distributed by EDUCATIONAL FILM EXCHANGES Inc. 




THE 



-*@?k 



DAILY 



Monday, January 29, 1923 



That Deal 



(Continued (rom Page 1) 

doubly significant. He has proven his ability as a producer 
which only accentuates that there is something for the entire 
industry to think about in this latest deal involving millions — a 
great deal. 

FEWER AND BETTER— YES? 
According to the FILM YEAR BOOK (out Wednesday) 
during 1922 there were 738 features released, and 1,304 one, two 
and three reelers. And you know how many were three reelers. 
All of which substantiates the claims of the optimists — that there 
are "fewer and better" pictures in the market. 

NORTH MEETING SOUTH 

Out among the Native Sons of Callyfornia the Northerners 
and Southerners don't often mix. You can start any row you 
want anywhere out there by telling a 'Frisco chap Los Angeles 
has it on his town. Or vice versa. Or any other way. But 
that didn't stop the hard headed business folk of Sacramento — 
which is North, so to speak Callyfornia, from investing a lot of 
money in Hollywood and calling it the Sacramento Pictures 
Corp. Lambert Hillyer to direct. J. G. Hunter — T & D inter- 
ested and J. C. McCann of Idaho, also a T & D man, in the con- 
cern. 

WHAT SLIPPED? 

A la Finnigan-on ag'in off ag'in, gone ag'in — relative to the 
combine theater and office building. To go up on Broadway. 
In the 40's. Gentleman interested has seen a lot of people. In 
a number of companies. Thought the idea was all set. And 
pretty. Was going to have half a dozen of the big companies 
co-operate. Show pictures in theater. Use office space in build- 
ing. All pretty, pretty. 

But something seems to have happened. At all events the 



big companies haven't lined up as yet. So far as signing th 
dotted line is concerned. Wonder what slipped? 

IT'S SURE TOUGH 
Jackie Coogan will have to give up $260,720 of his half mil 
lion from Metro. To the Government. As taxes. Says th 
Collector of Internal Revenue in Hollywood. 

COMMERCIAL DIRECTORS 
How few there are? You can count 'em. Almost on you 
fingers. One hand enough. They stand out. But a lot o 
others. Who think they're important. Won't even allow thei 
pictures to be touched. Must be released as made. Well, well 
If those self same directors made the kind of pictures. Tha 
needed no alterations; no cutting; no title changes. It migh 
be different. As it is if their bluff is called — well some younj 
men out Hollywood way might be in difficulties. Mentioning m 
names — at present. 

NO FORGETTING 
Marcus Loew is telling this one : When he arrived in 'Friso 
on his last visit there was a big reception. 'Welcome' signs al 
over the place. Hotel filled with 'em. Up in his room three bij 
trunks. Full of furs. With a 'welcome' sign atop. Won't le 
him forget he was once in the fur business. 

THE LION ROARS 
Some week for Goldwyn. Showed "The Christian." It's 
picture. Little long, but — boys, a bear. And then Godsol sign 
Victor Seastrom. Been making fine pictures in Sweden. Shouli 
do as well over here. And atop of that Joe Godsol almost closed- 
Gee — almost let something slip. 

IT'S COME TO THIS 
Rutgers Neilson. Sends out yarn to newspaper editors 
Of picture department. Talks about a Dinosaur pup. Naraet 

DANNY. 



LITTLE ADS WITH BIG THOUGHTS 



The only place of its kind in 
the World 

LLOYDS FILM STORAGE 

Corp. 

JOS. R. MILES 

Film Storage Vaults 
Cutting Rooms 
Projection Theatres 

Packing for domestic and ex- 
port shipment 
- Film' J Xibrary 
Editing and Titling 

Custom Clearances and For- 
'.' warding 



130 W. 46th St. 



Bryant 5600 



How to Run a Success- 
ful Business 

is a vitally important problem. We 
can help you solve it. 

W. A. FLEMING & CO. 

Public Accountants and Business 
Advisors 

452 Fifth Ave. Tel. Longacre 9074 



EVERY DAY— 

IN EVERY WAY— 

I am trying to make somebody's pic- 
ture better and better. How about 
yours ? 

LESLEY MASON 
729 7th Ave. Bryant 4741 



A knowledge of story writing and 
continuity work is of tremendous 
value in picture editing. 
Are you interested in having your pro- 
ductions edited and titled with this 
training apparent in the work? 

WILLIAM B. LAUB 

130 West 46th St. Bryant 9900 



N EGAT IV E WA NTE D 

Sunrises, Sunsets, Accidents, etc. 
Any Subjects of an extraordinary 
nature. 



What have you? 

FRED DAWES, 1407 Gower St. 

Phone 436572 Hollywood, Calif. 



ENLARGEMENTS 
of 

Motion Picture Film Clips 

For All Purposes 

W. J. MORAT 

302 E. 33d St. Vanderbilt 7361 



ART 
TITLES 

LOUIS MEYER 

Craftsmen Film Laboratories 

251 West 19th Street 
Watkins 7620-7461 



Watch this page every Monday. Exhibitors 
can find here the little things that help to build 
patronage. Producers the little things that 
go to make big pictures and Distributors 
the little big ideas that make for success. 



PUBLICITY 

The kind which sells your services or 
product. Call up Bryant 6763. 

FRED E. BAER 

Advertising 
Loeiv Bldg. , 1540 Broad tvay 



Bryant 5741 

CHARLES WALTON 

Personal Representative 

Serving the Best in Motion Pictures 

Producers, Directors 

Motion Picture Service 

245 West 47th St. N. Y. C. 



THE 



Barnes Printing Company 



I N c. 



Phone Watkins 1416-17 

Increased Facilities for 
Printing Colored Inserts, 
Heralds, Programs, etc. 

"We Never Disappoint" 



229 W. 28th St., New York Citl 



7Ae BRADSTREET 
of FILMDOM 





ZfoRECOCMIZE* 

Authority 




ol. XXIII No. 29 



Tuesday, January 30, 1923 



Price 5 Cents 



Ready For Signing 

nal Conference on Uniform Con- 
racts to Be Held Friday — Many 

Months' Work Over 
\ final conference has been ar- 
lged for Friday, at which the uni- 
m contract will be signed by the 
cessary parties, the T. O. C. C, 
: M. P. T. O. A. and the M. P. 
D. A. — the latter the Hays organi- 
;ion. This is the plan agreed upon 
present, and will be cariied through 
less some unforeseen obstacle 
suld present itself. 
rhe various committees represent- 
t the interested parties, have been 
work for about six months. It is 
w believed that a contract has been 
Dived that will prove satisfactory 
everyone. It is understood that 
iday was agreed upon to allow 
dney S. Cohen to gather several 
:mbers of his executive committee 
town for the final meeting. Present 
Friday will be State Senator 
tnes J. Walker. The T. O. C. C. 
,nts him there as matter of senti- 
:nt. 



Selznick News Discontinued 

Selznick News has been discon- 
ued. The last issue appeared 
turday. 



A. M. P. A. to See "Extra" 
rhe A. M. P, A. is giving a the- 
ir party on Thursday night at the 
mgacre theater to see "Extra," 
)duced by Jack Alicoate of THE 
LM DAILY. 



A. B. C. Buys "Suzanna" 
rhe Associated Booking Corp. has 
ised with the Allied Prod, and Dist. 
show "Suzanna" the end of March. 
B. C. starts showing "The Ninety 
d Nine" the week of Feb. 11 in 
inhattan and the Bronx and in 
ooklyn the following week. 



Abandon Reel 

lucational Gives Up Graphic — T. 
O. C. C. Handled 12 of Them 

Locally 
\fter handling 12 issues of the 
lucational Graphic in Greater New 
irk the Theater Owners Chamber 

Commerce has cancelled its ar- 
lgement with the producer. The 
:1 has been abandoned, 
rhe one reeler, which was of a 
gazine nature, was primarily made 

the local exhibitor body, but was 
o intended for distribution 
oughout the country. It is 
ierstood that the reel did not meet 
h the reception expected. 




"The Last Hour," produced by Edward Sloman for Mastodon Films, 
Inc., is declared to be, "season's best crook story made into a film pro- 
duction so cleverly as to add much to the charm and interest of the nar- 
rative," by the critic of Exhibitor's Herald. — Advt. 



Be Men ! 



When children put their fingers in each other's eye and start 
a neighborhood row because one won't let another suck his 
lolly-pop, older, intelligent people smile and say, "Well, they're 
only children." 

When men old enough to have their individual businesses 
row over the sucking of a lolly-pop, they are usually called 
"damn fools." 

This refers and is intended to refer to the members of the 
T. O. C. C. and the F. I. L. M. Clubs of New York. It makes 
little difference who owns the lolly-pop. It makes less differ- 
ence who refused to let the other fellow take a lick. 

For months past, the Arbitration Board of these two organ- 
izations in settling film disputes, has been held up by every one 
in the industry, aware of its operations, as a model upon which 
exhibitors and exchange men could and should operate. There- 
fore, when for some silly reason, there is a possibility of this 
effective and worth-while institution being abolished, it is not 
only deplorable but disastrous. 

Certainly there should be sufficient sanity, sufficient good 
sense, sufficient business intelligence in these two organizations 
to block this idiotic movement. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Schenck Signs In? 

Coast Reports Deal With West Coast 
Theaters, Inc. — Another One 
Mentioned 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — It is reported here 
that Joseph M. Schenck has pur- 
chased an interest in West Coast 
Theaters, Inc. Although not con- 
firmed, credence is placed in the 
statement that his interest varies 
from 15% to 20%-. 



Irving M. Lesser, stated yesterday 
he had received no word from the 
coast which would indicate that 
Schenck had bought into the Lesser- 
Gore-Ramish chain which recently 
took over the T. and D. interests. 
Felix Feist of the Schenck office said 
it was news to him. 

Advices received by First National 
from the coast indicated that the re- 
port might be correct. 



Another report in circulation had it 
that Jensen and Von Herberg might 
also purchase an interest in the West 
Coast Theaters, Inc. 



"Paddy" Opens in London 
(Special Cable to THE FILM DAILY) 
London — "Paddy-The-Best-Next- 
Thing," starring Mae Marsh, opened 
at the Scala on Saturday. The pic- 
ture was received with high praise 
from the press. 

FREDMAN„ 



Here on Distribution of "Paddy" 

Charles Wilcox of Graham-Wilcox 
Prod, is at the Waldorf to arrange 
for the release of "Paddy-The-Next- 
Best-Thing" and "Flames of Pas- 
sion," both starring Mae Marsh. 



B'way Competition 

Keith Circuit May Use Legitimate 
Houses for Sunday Shows — Ex- 
periment at Cohan Theater 

The Keith circuit is seriously con- 
sidering taking over a number of 
legitimate theaters on Broadway for 
special picture shows on Sunday only 
by way of competition to the big 
Broadway first-runs. 

The matter has been under discus- 
sion for some time. That the idea 
has taken hold in some sort of a 
definite form is indicated by the fact 
that on Sunday, "While Paris Sleeps" 
goes into the George M. Cohan for 
that day only, and on the next day 
starts a week's run at Moss' Broad- 
way. This deal, covering the Cohan 
theater, was closed by Arthur G. 
Whyte, representing the Keith in- 
terests and George Dillon, local Hod- 
kinson manager. 



THE 



<^3 



DAILY 



■^— i — m < m 

Tuesday, January 30, 1923 




Vol. XXIII Ho. 29 Tuesday, Jan, 30.1923 Price Stents 

Copyright ly23, Wid's film aad Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor ; 
\V. Alienate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager ; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post ofhee at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Tennj I Postage free) United States. Outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00 ; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
Addles all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY. 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E, Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 
Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

W abash Ave. 
Londoii Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave , London, W. 1. 
Pans Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central European Representative— Interna- 
tionale Filmschau. Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
valia> Wenzelsplatz. 



Quotations 



High Low Close Sales 

East. Kod.. 96y 2 96^ 96^ 100 

F. P.-L. ..84 84 84 200 

do pfd. ..95^ 95 95 200 

Goldwyn ..6 6 6 200 

Griffith Not quoted 

Loew's ... 19 l A 19 19 1.100 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 



Mid-West Notes 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
La Porte, Ind. — The Central is 
being completely remodeled. 



Des Moines — R. G. McCurdy has 
been appointed Universal exploiteer 
in Buffalo. 



Chicago — Harry and Leo Brunhild 
have left for a three weeks' -vacation 
trip to Florida. 



Gibson City, 111. — Wooley Bros, 
have opened their new Edna. The 
house seats 700. 



St. Louis — The lllmo Amus. Co. 
have acquired control of the Main 
Street in AnnL, 111. 



Chicago — W. D. Burford. secretary 
of the Theater Owners Dist. Corp., 

has returned from New York. 



Steubenville, O. — George Schafer, 
owner of the Victoria, is planning a 
$300,000 house here, construction on 
which will begin at an early date. 



Chicago — The Alcazar and Rose, 
recently taken over by C. E. Beek, 
will soon have to be dismantled to 
make way for the new addition to the 
Morrison Hotel. 



(T (£>cUuxi£i07iai. (J ■Cctiorju-' 




~ 



Borzage Leaves Today 

Frank Borzage leaves for the coast 
today to start work on his First 
National series. 



Musgrove Here from Australia 
•Harry Musgrove, First National 
distributor in Australasia, is at the 
Biltmore. 



Photoplay Shortage? 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Several big pro- 
ducers here say that at the present 
time there is a shortage of screen ma- 
terial. 



Bonns Arranging Detroit Showing 

Eddie Bonns left for Detroit last 
night to arrange for the premiere of 
The Christian" at the Broadway- 
Strand. There will be a showing for 
exhibitors at the Statler Hotel 
shortly. 



Wales With Mayer 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Wellington Wales 
recently Marshall Neilan's business 
manager, has been made business 
manager of the Louis B. Mayer or- 
ganization. 



Talk of Anti-Dope Film 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Los Angeles — It is reported here 
that Mrs. Wallace Reid (Dorothy 
Davenport), will appear in a film 
showing the evils of the dope traffic. 
The report has it that the proceeds 
will be used to erect a memorial to 
Reid's memory. 



Mayer To Retire 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Chicago— Emil Mayer, for many 
years chief accountant with Jones, 
Linick and Schaefer, will retire Feb. 
15, and will make his future home in 
California. Sigmund Faller, former 
manager of the Orpheum, succeeds 
Mayer, while George H. Moore be- 
comes manager of the Orpheum. 



Will Operate Distributing System 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — It is reported here 
that local capital is financing the new 
national distribution system to be 
operated by Burr Nickle Prod. Ex- 
changes have already been establish- 
ed in 27 cities. 

Eight of the scheduled twelve pro- 
ductions have been finished. 






• 



■ 



Receiver Asked For 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Newark — Libman and Spanger 
have filed an application for receiver- 
ship against the New Jersey Theaters 
Corp., and the owner of the Lind- 
hurst, at Lindhurst. The assets are 
reported at $90,000 with liabilities 
listed at $85,000 including a mortgage 
on the prop erty. 

May Develop Albany Chain 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Albany, N. Y.— C. H. Buckley and 
J. E. Tarsches, proprietors of the Le- 
land, have obtained a lease of the 
Clinton Square from Fred P. Elliott. 
Oscar J. Perrin, manager of the Le- 
land, will have charge of the Clinton 
Square. Buckley and Tarsches plan 
to establish a chain. 



Schwalbe Returns 
Harry Schwalbe returned yesterday 
from a duck hunting trip. 



Exhibitor Beefsteak Thursday 

■ The much discussed beefsteak of 
the T. O. C. C, will be held Thurs- 
day night at Healy's. 



Levinson Recovering 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Lakewood, N. J. — Lew Levinson, 
formerly with Supreme in Philadel- 
phia, is here recuperating from a re- 
cent serious illness. 



Adds to Equipment 
Oscar C. Bucheister has added a 
Bell and Howell camera and a special 
stand to his title equipment. William 
J. Hart has become associated with 
Bucheister in the conduct of the busi- 
ness. The stand is one of Buch- 
eister's own invention. 



Buxbaum Closes Up-State Deals 

Harry H. Buxbaum, of Famous 
Players, has returned from a trip up- 
state where he sold the "Super 39," 
to Nate Robbins for Utica, Water- 
town and Syracuse. Buxbaum states 
all key points up-state have been 
sold. 



Skirboll Promoted 

Joe Skirboll, for many years in the 
exchange end of the business and 
more recently First National manager 
in Pittsburgh has been promoted to a 
district managership in charge of one 
of the Western districts. A. S. Davis 
succeeds Skirboll in Pittsburgh. 



Jersey Reform Element Active 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Trenton, N. J. — The Presbytery of 
New Brunswick has adopted a resolu- 
tion condemning the Sunday amuse- 
ment bill introduced by Minority 
Leader Alexander Simpson, of Hud- 
son County in the Senate. The Simp- 
son Bill provides for the opening of 
picture houses after 1 o'clock Sunday 
afternoon. North Jersey, particularly 
Jersey City, favors the measure but 
the central and southern sections are 
opposed. 



Phone — Beekman 9091 




119 Fulton St., N. Y. 

INSURANCE EXPERTS 

TO THE THEATRICAL AND 

MOTION PICTURE INDUSTRY 




SIMPLEX TITLE SHOP 

220 W. 42nd St. 
Announces the closing of a contract 
giving it exclusive sales rights on the 

FAMOUS STONE LIBRARY 
Over two million feet of selected shots 
as far back as 1897, negative and posi- 
tive, are now made available for your 
requirements. 

Phone Bryant 0984-0985 



Reproductive quality enables the sensitive 
emulsion to correctly portray every step of 
gradation from highest light to deepest 
shadow. 







EASTMAN 
POSITIVE FILM 






faithfully reproduces every tone of the 
negative. It carries the quality through 
to the screen. 



Eastman Film, both regular and tinted base — 
now available in nine colors, is identified through- 
out its length by the words "Eastman" "Kodak" 
stenciled in black letters in the transparent margin. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



THE 



rmmmmmmm 
nesday, January 30, 1923 



mitt jH**j 




DAILY 



3 



Censorship in Australia 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
dney. N. S. \V. — A stringent 
Drship measure has been passed 

Censors for Washington? 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

okane, Wash. — Several women's 
5 are behind the censor bill which 
icpected to be presented to the 

lature soon. 



Meat Alabama "Blue" Law 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

ontgomery, Ala. — A bill to pro- 
. Sunday amusements has been 
finitely postponed by an eighteen 
eventeen vote by the Senate. 
he measure was aimed at Sunday 
ball and pictures in Mobile and 
itgomery. 



Be Men ! 



(Continued from Page 1) 

It is especially annoying that a break should come at this 
time — on the eve of the adoption of a uniform contract — one of 
the features of which must be an arbitration arrangement to 
settle disputes without recourse to costly court procedure. 

The grown-up men, members of these organizations, if un- 
able to agree on who should lick the lolly-pop, can prove their 
right to be called business men by throwing away that which 
is in dispute, and starting anew. DANNY. 



Coast Brevities 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Hollywood — William Russell's next 
will be. "Wanted— A Wife." 



Watching Indiana Situation 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Duisville, Ky. — Exhibitors here 
very much interested in the 
orship situation in Indiana. In 
e quarters it is feared that the 
m of the Indiana legislature may 
: some effect in Kentucky. 



men Against Censors in Carolina 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

harlotte, N. C— The North Caro- 
, Federation of , Women's Clubs 
not present any censorship 
sures for two years, it is believed, 
iew of a recent resolution which 
ged the organization to watch 
'Hays movement before introduc- 
,new measures. 



Phil Goldstone has retained Wil- 
lian Howard to direct another produc- 
tion. 



Jeff Lazarus, who recently arrived 
from the East, is now in charge of 
advertising and publicity for the 
Grauman interests. 



Sol Lesser is sending a print of the 
original "Oliver Twist," featuring 
Nat Goodwin, to England, where it 
will be shown in comparison with the 
modern version. 



In addition to Betty Compson and 
Conway Tearle, Herbert Brenon se- 
cured Anna Q. Nilsson and Cyril 
Chadwick to appear in "The Rustle 
of Silk." 

H. E. GAUSMAN. 



Abe Sablotsky 111 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Philadelphia — Abe Sablotsky is ill 
with the grippe. 



Sparks Buys Three S. E. Houses 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Atlanta — E. J. Sparks, Florida 
supervisor for Southern Enterprises, 
has bought from that company their 
theater interests in Orlando, Lakeland 
and St. Petersburg. However Sparks 
will not sever his connections with 
the organization. 



iJfviumrc (Unrpnr<itimi 

RESOURCES - $5,000,000 

Knickerbocker Building 
Broadway at 42nd Street, N. T. dry 







WE ARE READ* TO PAV 



Washington 'Changed Disturbed 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Washington — Exchange managers 
here are put out over the more or 
less arbitrary attitude assumed by 
the Virginia censors in issuing bulle- 
tins containing rejections and elimina- 
tions in pictures before the exchanges 
have had a chance to appeal the 
original decision. 



FOR PRODUCTIONS OF MERIT 

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The Ne'er Do Well" 




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By REX BEACH 






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Directed by Alfred Green 



Released April 22nd 



No. 
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THE masterpiece of one of the greatest The whole company went to Panama for 

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special. Broke." 

"r>„ !, c .. » No. 11 "The Nth Commandment" 

"^AmeS Wife." >? *£*. Billing. Spend* Hi. Dime'' 

"Drums of Fate." 

"Nobody's Money." 

"Adam'. Rib." 

"Java Head." » ~t(\ f<V)I|l 

'The White Flower." 




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'Adam and Eva" 
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No. 12 

No. 13 

No. 14 

No. IS 

No. 16 

No. 17 

No is 

Ko. 19 



"The Glimpses of the Moon.' 

"The Leopardess." 

"Bella Donna." 

"Grumpy." 

"The Go-Getter." 

"Prodigal Daughters." 

"The Law of the Lawless." 






<X (paramount Qidure 



WATCH THIS 

SPACE 

MONDAY 



No. 21 



THE 



-3&*t, 



DAILY 



Tuesday, January 30, 1923 



Newspaper Opinions 

"The Dangerous Age"— 1st Nat'l 
Strand 

MORXINO WORLD— For a photoplay 
with so little individuality, this one is right 
interesting and it carries a moral. * * * Its 
execution is first rate, Mr. Stahl having 
arranged his continuity smoothly and dra- 
matically. Its acting by Mr. Stone is, as 
usual, good, and there is a girl, Edith 
Roberts, who is likely to be heard of again 
right soon. * * * 

The photoplay is one of the type which 
the cinema kings refer to as "a damn good 
audience picture." 

TRIBUNE — As for us, we enjoyed every 
flicker of the picture, and we hadn't read 
the novel, so there was no chance of dis- 
appointment on that score. It seems to us 
an interesting theme, well acted and per- 
fectly directed. * * * At any rate, we 
cheerfully recommend it and hope that its 
appeal will be wide. 

AMERICAN— The entire production is 
interesting, ingenuously timely, and adheres 
faithfully to the question it asks and answers. 
Lewis Stone is excellently cast as John 
Emerson and is well supported. * * * 

TIMES — It is not a bore. It is enter- 
taining. It sermonizes a bit, but it is so 
well done as a motion picture that you are 
allowed to forget the sermon and enjoy the 
film as just a story, which, presumably, is 
what you want to do. * * * 

This same story told as nine directors out 
of ten would tell it would be tame, dull stuff. 
You know that. But John M. Stahl has put 
life into it. He has made motion pictures 
that seem real. 

EVENING WORLD — Of course, we 
won't tell you what it is ; that would spoil 
things. Go see for yourself, we don't think 
you'll regret it. 

TELEGRAM—* * * exhibits anew Mr. 
Stahl's forte for the delineation of the dra- 
matic side of American family life. Again 
he transfers the hopes, joys, griefs and sor- 
rows of that complex institution, the Ameri- 
can home, to the screen without distorting 
them. 

MAIL — * * * one of compelling interest 
to both young and old. There are few bet- 
ter screen actors than Lewis Stone, and he 
lends to the role of John Emerson a sympathy 
and understandig that makes this prosperous 
husband, who has reached the "dangerous 
age," one of the most convincing and ap- 
pealing characters that has appeared in the 
films in some time. 

SUN — And let it be said at the outset 
"The Dangerous Age" is a fine picture. It 
is a sensible, human and touching story. 
No maudlin sob stuff. No silly and obvious 
preaching. But for its rather dull beginnig 
it would come very near being the best 
American story and picture of the year. 

HERALD — There is one tremendous pic- 
torial punch in the film, which is provided 
by that old familiar stunt — a race between 
an automobile and an express train. In this 
instance the pictures are taken at night, so 
that the effect is achieved by headlights 
streaming through utter blackness. It is 
gorgeous photography, and in itself well 
worth the price of admission at the Strand. 



"The World's Applause"— F. P.-L. 
Rivoli 

MORNING WORLD— Mr. De Mille has 
given this story * * * quite a lot of color, 
and he has photographed Bebe Daniels and 
Mr. Stone and others in striking scenic 
frames. The yarn is simple-minded melo- 
drama. * * * 

DAILY NEWS— It is the kind of picture 
that makes you wish you'd stayed home and 
played cassino instead of venturing out into 
the bad weather. As far as we could make 
out, it had nothing to recommend it. The 
moral tacked on to the end did nothing 
to make up for the unpleasantness that had 
gone before. 

TRIBUNE— The story is interesting; it 
is also well played and well directed by Wil- 
liam De Mille. but unfortunately the titles 
sound like nothing in the world but titles! 

AMERICAN- — Miss Daniels wore some 
supergorgeous clothes and just enough of 
them to be correct. 

EVENING WORLD.— The picture deals 
in scandal with a capital "S, and serves 
to while away an hour and a half in a 
fairly exciting and interesting manner. 

TELEGRAM—* * * of more than pass- 
ing interest * * * Mr. De Mille has pre- 
sented a vital subject, has pointed a moral, 



Rosen With Goldstone 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Phil Rosen has sev- 
ered connection with Paramount and 
has joined Phil Goldstone Prod., 
where he will direct "Honor Bound." 



Foreign Deal on "Oliver Twist" 

"Oliver Twist" has been sold for 
Czecho-Slovakia, Austria, Hungary, 
Yugo-Slavia, Poland, Bulgaria, Rou- 
mania, European Turkey and Greece. 



"Roto" Issued for "Omar" 

As part of the accessories for 
"Omar the Tentmaker," First Na- 
tional has made up an eight page roto- 
gravure section for distribution by 
exhibitors to the newspapers in their 
locality. 



Cuts and Flashes 

Bebe Daniels was operated yester- 
day for appendicitis. 



Lee Ferguson is now director of 
publicity at the Brooklyn Strand. 



May Boycott Exchanges 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Spokane, Wash. — Exhibitors here 
threaten to boycott the larger pro- 
ducers and distributors who rent a 
local house to show the big pictures 
and pass up the first runs who regu- 
larly buy their product. They cite 
"Knighthood" as an example. 



but lias always kept the dramatic interest 
in the foreground. 

MAIL — William De Mille has made a 
somewhat gripping and powerful picture of 
"The World's Applause," with Bebe Daniels 
and Lewis Stone, at the Rivoli this week. 

GLOBE — "Distinguished" seems to be the 
most suitable adjective to apply to William 
De Mille's "The World's Applause," show- 
ing this week at the Rivoli. It is probably 
the nearest approach to a Belasco produc- 
tion the screen has yet given. * * * This 
latest production of Mr. De Mille's is most 
certainly something to which his contem- 
porary workers and colleagues can and should 
point with pride. 

This acting is far above the average. 

SUN — William De Mille is a conscientious 
director, who prefers to deal with over- 
tones. * * * Consequently the picture is 
presented with a very convincing air of 
reality, even at the party, when the electric 
piano plays in one room while the stabbing 
performance goes on in the next. * * * Bebe 
Daniels takes another step upward in her 
ascent as a capable dramatic actress. * * * 



George W. Trendle of the Kunsky 
chain, Detroit was in town yesterday. 

Distinctive Prod., Inc., have taken 
over the Biograph studio in the 
Bronx. 



George Landy, newly appointed 
publicity representative for Jackie 
Coogan is in town. 



Fox announces the following for 
February release. "The Net," "The 
Town That Forgot God," "Romance 
Land," "Truxton King," "The Sales- 
man," and "The Wise Cracker." 



The eight page advertisement on 
the test engagement of "The Dan- 
gerous Age" in Paterson, N. J., is 
being sent out to exhibitors to aid 
them in their campaign in putting 
this picture over. 



Stanley Anniversary 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Philadelphia — Victor Herbert will 
be guest conductor at the Stanley 
next week, Anniversary Week. 



Goldman Resigns 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Kansas City, Mo. — Lawrence E. 

Goldman has tendered his resignation 

as secretary and counsel for the state 

M. P. T. O. 



WANTED 

Stereoscopic Motion Picture Camera. 
Must have two lenses, 2$/% inches 
apart. Spot Cash. Give full infor- 
mation fist letter. 
Box B-329 c/o Film Daily. 



FOR SALE 

PORTABLE GRAPHOSCOPE 

Brand New. List Price $260. 

Will sell for $185 to quick purchaser. 

J. T. REMEY 
247 East 41st Street New York City- 
Murray Hill 3457 



THE ODD ! THE UNUSUAL ! 



"THE RED TRAIL" 

Featuring NORA SWINBURNE 



A powerful love story with some of the most unusual 
"animal stuff" ever filmed. 



NORCA PICTURES, Inc. 1540 Broadway, N.Y. City 



NOTHING LIKE IT 

WHEN the program building "Short Stuff" issue of THE FILM 
DAILY appeared last Summer it brought enthusiastic ex- 
pressions from exhibitors, large and small, throughout the 
country. 

It was so valuable, so informative, so worth while to the 
entire industry, that it seems assured that the forthcoming issue, 
devoted to Short Stuff, out February 18, will receive even a more 
cordial welcome. And as comprehensive, as helpful, as the initial 
number was the forthcoming issue will be better, in every way. . 

Exhibitors who are "showmen" and who want to improve 
their presentation will not only read every word of it, but will file 
it for future reference and use. 

Don't forget the date — Sunday, February 18. 

Without doubt the best "buy" that a producer or distributor 
of short stuff can make. Our advertising solicitor is as close to 
you as your 'phone. 



IHE 

7Ae BYSTREET 
of FILMDOM 





z^recochized 
Authority 




/ol. XXIII No. 30 



Wednesday, January 31, 1923 



Price 5 Cents 



Arbuckle to Direct 

ever Again To Appear On Screen 
As An Actor— To Start Work 
Immediately 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Hollywood — In a statement issued 
:sterday, Roscoe ("Fatty") Ar- 
ickle announced that he would start 
ork immediately with the Reel 
3medies, Inc., as a director. The 
atement contained an expression to 
e effect that he was "done with 
:ting," and that this was his 
nance to make good in the right 
ay." He also said that he would 
art work immediately, concluding 
ith the expression "from now on 
>u will not see or hear from me ex- 
pting through the comedies which 
direct." 



As before noted. Famous Players 
is written off feature comedies in 
hich Arbuckle appears. They will 
:ver be released. 



No Deal Closed 

unuel Goldwyn Issues Statement 
Regarding Distribution of Fitz- 
maurice Productions 

Relative to the before noted report 
at Samuel Goldwyn was negotiating 
ith Hiram Abrams regarding to the 
stribution of George Fitzmaurice 
oductions, Samuel Goldwyn said 
ssterday: 

"While it is true that I am ne- 
gating for distribution of the 
itzmaurice productions, no deal has 
:en closed." 



T. O. C. C. Indorses Uniform 
Contract 

At the meeting of the T. O. C. C. 
:sterday, the proposed uniform con- 
act was discussed enthusiastically. 
he T. O. C. C. will affix their sig- 
ttures on Friday. 



rlelene Chadwick Seeks Injunction 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Helen Chadwick is 
eking an injunction to restrain 
oldwyn from interfering with her 
forts to obtain work from other 
'oducers. 

Miss Chadwick alleges that Gold- 
yn permitted her contract to lapse 
id then maintained that she was 
ill in their employ. She claims that 
:cause of an understanding under 
hich all coast producers operate 
ayers cannot get work from other 
•oducers while still bound by an 
:isting agreement. Her contract, it 
alleged, was to run for two years. 




Lon Chaney, as a sculpture, mad with jealousy, entraps his rival in a 
fiendish chamber of torture. The development of the story of Maurice 
Tourneur's production, "WHILE PARIS SLEEPS," up to this point and 
the rescue of the hero provides a thrill that will be remembered by your 
'patrons for a long time. It's a Hodkinson money-maker. — Advt. 



Results 



Baumann Dist. Co. 

New York City 

The Film Daily: 

No doubt you are interested to learn just what advertisers 
receive in the way of returns from their Ads. 

While I do not personally know the circulation of THE 
FILM DAILY, the actual returns I have received from the ad- 
vertising which I have been doing, leads me to believe that your 
circulation must be nothing less than that of the 'Saturday Even- 
ing Post.' 

Replies came not only from every State in the Union, but 
from England, France, Germany, China and other points in the 

Orient. 

Yours very truly, 

CHAS. O. BAUMANN. 



Sam Goldwyn After Seena Owen? 

With the completion of "The Go- 
Getter," Seena Owen's present con- 
tract with Cosmopolitan expired. It 
is understood that Samuel Goldwyn 
will tender her a long term contract 
starring her in coming productions. 

When Goldwyn was reached yes- 
terday he said he know nothing of it. 



Ballin Starts Another Soon 
Hugo Ballin who has just com- 
pleted "Vanity Fair" will make an- 
other production at Goldwyn. 



O'Brien Going to Coast 
Dennis F. O'Brien leaves for the 
coast tomorrow to confer with Doug 
and Mary. 



Others in Deal? 

Reports Will Not Down That Von 
Herberg Will Be Interested in 
New Coast Combine 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
San Francisco — J. H. Von Her- 
berg, is here en route to Palm Beach. 
In film circles the reports continue 
to circulate that Von Herberg either 
has, or will have an interest in the 
new theater combine engineered by 
the Lesser organization — the T. & D. 
and West Coast. 



Hollywood — The film world here 
continue to talk of Jensen & Von 
Herberg being interested in the Les- 
ser combine with T. & D. The fact 
that Joe Schenck is involved, hold- 
ing a 20 per cent interest, has caused 
much comment in view of Schenck's 
connections with First National and 
Metro. 



No one in authority would discuss 
the possibility of the Von Herberg 
affiliation with the Lesser-Gore group 
yesterday, although well posted film 
folk insist that it is not only prob- 
able, but exceedingly logical. 



Gore in Charge at 'Frisco 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
San Francisco — Abe Gore, secretary 
of West Coast Theaters will go to 
San Francisco shortly to manage the 
new Northern interests of the com- 
pany. From there he will eventually 
go to New York, where he will ar- 
range for vaudeville to play over the 
West Coast circuit. He will offer 30 
weeks. 



Coogans Arrive Saturday 
Jackie Coogan, accompanied by 
his parents, is scheduled to arrive 
here Saturday. 



"Roxy" Sails 
S. L. Rothafel sailed for Europe 
yesterday aboard the Berengaria. 



Split With Dalton Denied 

Reports reaching New York from 
Los Angeles yesterday credited 
Dorothy Dalton with severing con- 
nections with Famous Players upon 
completion of "The Law of the Law- 
less." Disagreement over salary was 
given as the reason for the alleged 
dispute. 

Robert T. Kane, production man- 
ager of Famous Players iaid yester- 
day there was nothing to it yesterday. 
He added that arrangements for "Fog 
Bound," Miss Dalton's next picture 
had been completed. 



2 

m 




I — n i'i JUJ i — — i 

Wednesday, January 31, 1923 



■■* ■"—■ ' ■<"-• ■ 




Vol. XXIII No 30 Wednesday, Jan. 31, 1923 Price 5 Cents 



Copyright 1923, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc., Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York. N. Y., by WID'S FILMS an<f 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

Joseph Dannenberg, President and Editor; 
. W. Alicoate, Treasurer and Business Man- 
ager ; J. A. Cron, Advertising Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months $3.00. Foreign 
$15.00. Subscribers should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, 
N. Y. 'Phone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5538. 
Hollywood, California — Harvey E. Gausman, 
6411 Hollywood Blvd. 'Phone, Hollywood 
1603. 
Chicago Representative — Irving Mack, 802 S. 

Wabash Ave. 
London Representative — Ernest W. Fred- 
man. The Film Renter, 53a Shaftesbury 
Ave., London, W. 1. 
Pans Representative — Le Film, 42 Rue de 

Clichy. 
Central European Representative — Interna- 
tionale Filmschau, Prague (Czecho-Slo- 
vakia), Wenzelsplatz. 



Quotations 



High Low Close 
East. Kod.. 96^ 96y 2 96^ 
F. P.-L. ..84 84 84 
do pfd. .. 95 l A 95 95 
Goldwyn ..6 6 6 

-Griffith Not 

Loew's ... 19^ 19 19 

Triangle Not quoted 

World Not quoted 



Sales 
100 
200 
200 
200 
quoted 

1.100 



"3rd Alarm" Closes Sunday 

''The Third Alarm" closes its run 
at the Astor theater on Sunday. 



(T^cUu>aturrLaI 6\cLl 




Ohe Oscar C. 
jBuchheister Co. 

ART TITLES 

UPrintecCQitles b^Speciol bffects 

l30W.4-OtiiSt 

New York: City 

r^ant 5466 



FOR RENT 

Small studio suitable for fashion, test 

or experimental work, also cartoon 

stand by the hour, week or month. 

ERNEST STERN 

203 West 40th St., N. Y. C, 

Telephone Penn. 2373-74 



tfttiada y>uru 



Look Betterand Wear Longer 



Robbins' Directors Elected 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Utica, N. Y. — The following have 
been elected directors of Robbins' 
Enterprises, Inc., W. Green, C. W. 
Cushman, of this city; W. C. Doo- 
little of Trenton; J. Rothstein, E. 
Willis and Jenny Lowery. 



Harlem Theater Sold 

James L. Van Sant has purchased 
the theater at 125 East 116th St., 
from Walter C. Hubbard. 

Quinlan and Leland have placed a 
first mortgage loan of $200,000 on 
the Boulevard theater, at 1026 South- 
ern Boulevard. 



Isidore Burenson will build a one- 
story theater, to cost $60,000, on the 
southwest corner of Hughes Ave. and 
186th St. 



Says Censorship Is Unnecessary 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Camden, N. J. — In his recent in- 
augural address, Mayor Victor King 
said the local censor commissioner is 
not needed, pointing out that the 
abolition of the position would be a 
good way to cut down the expenses 
of the city. 



Fitzgerald Story for Hunter 
A crook story written by F. Scott 
Fitzgerald for Glenn Hunter will be 
the next Film Guild picture for Hod- 
kinson. The scenario will be writ- 
ten by James Ashmore Cfeelman 
and directed by Frank Tuttle. 

By special arrangement Mary Astor 
will work with Richard Barthelmess 
in "The Bright Shawl." 



CHROMOS TRADING COMPANY 

1123 Broadway 

Offers a Speedy, Confidential 

FINANCIAL SERVICE 
for FILM PROPOSITIONS 

CONSULTATIONS INVITED WITH RELIABLE PRINCIPALS 
REASONABLE RATES 
An Interview Involves no Obligations 



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Now Located in 
Suite 1207-1208 



'Phone Chelsea 
8284 



Ince To Help Mrs. Reid 
The Ince offices announced yester- 
day that Thomas H. Ince had 
offered Mrs. Wallace Reid his fullest 
co-operation in the production of the : 
anti-dope picture she contemplates. 



^trtanrc GJcrpartxtxim 

RESOURCES - $5,000,000 

Knickerbocker Building 
Broadway at 42nd Street, N. T. City 



International Distributer's of 
MOTION PICTURES 



Bfe^fSa 



EBji&ispSSl 



Ikter-Ocfan Film Corporation 



INTER-OCEAN BUILDfNG 

218 WEST 42nd stV>'' '- NKW .^O'KK 

BRYANT 78 i 2 

WHEN YOU THINK OF 
FOREIGN THINK' OF 

INTERS DEAN 



ART TITLES 

LOUIS MEYER 

Craftsmen Film Lab. 

251 West 19th St. 

Watkins 7260-7461 




Rich in Drawing Power, 

"POOR MEN'S WIVES" 

Opened at the Criterion, New York, Sunday. Don Allen in the 
Evening World wrote, "Thousands seemed to prefer it and jammed the 
Criterion for the evening showing." 

And the other critics called it a great play. 

It is great because it's a Preferred Picture directed by Gasnier. 



PREFERRED 
PICTURESIhc. 

6-PSchv.lbcrf .p r „ J.G.BachtMDO -That 



fcnribrtcd by 

AL-LICHTMAN 

CORPO R . A T I O N 

i6508noADWAv(&£Wu' votut crrv 



THE 



Wednesday, January 31, 1923 



j%fr*; 



DAILY 



PatteNews 

No. 10 

ERMANS PROTEST FRENCH OCCU- 

ATION OF THE RUHR— Mammoth mass 

leetings in Berlin. 

RENCH TROOPS PENETRATE OVER 

) MILES BEYOND OCCUPATION 

ONE — Scenes of the French advance which 

irs the world. 

ther first page news as usual. 

I t> IB THE FIRST NEWS REEL 
THE REAL NEWS FIRST 

today 



Ward Managing Stratford House 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Stratford, Ont.— John V. Ward, 
irmer manager of the Province, 
Winnipeg, has been appointed man- 
ger of the local Allen house. 



Must Improve Ventilation 
(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 

Washington— Health Officer Fowl- 
r has ordered local houses to im- 
rove their ventilation. Inspectors 
:cently declared 13 theaters out of 
pproximately 18 visited were un- 
initary so far as ventilation is con- 
:rned. 



At Broadway Theaters 

Cameo 

"Master Melodies," by Grieg, is the cur. 
rent overture unit, followed by the Cameo 
Pictorial, Topics of the Day, "Poem," a 
violin solo rendered by Pau Tiesenghouse, 
and a Post Nature Scenic, "Winter Tale." 
"One Million in Jewels," is the feature, 
which precedes. "Once Over," a comedy. 
Several selections on the organ by John 
Priest is last. 

Capitol 

The opening musicale number is Over- 
ture to "Robin Hood," the current attrac- 
tion. An organ number is the only extra 
unit because of the length of "Robin Hood." 

Criterion 

"Badinage," is the overture, followed by a 
Mutt and Jeff comedy, "Nearing the End," 
"Sunbeams," a Prizma scenic and a short 
Mermaid Comedy, "High Powres. A pro- 
logue to the feature, "Poor Men's Wives," 
is next. 

Rialto 

The regular weekly Rialto Magazine opens 
the bill. Other film events are : "Pike's 
Peak — And Busted," Dan Mason as "Pop" 
Tuttle in the "Long Shot," and "Nobody's 
Money," with an all star cast headed by 
Jack Holt. The musical numbers include : 
The first and second movements of 
"Scheherazade," Riesenfeld's Classical Jazz, 
and the Weber Male Quartette, (a) Lassie 
O' Mine, (b). But He Didn't. 

Rivoli 

The overture is "Thirteenth Hungarian 
Rhapsody." Riesenfeld's Classical Jazz, the 
Rivoli Pictorial, Scene from "Herodiade," 
and the feature picture, "The World's Ap- 
plause," dome next. Spanish Dances, by 
Paul Oscard and Vera Myers, and "Peg 
of the Movies," with Baby Peggy, conclude 
the performance. 

Strand 

"Fresco" is the overture. Walt Kuhn's 
latest dance travesty, "Petulant Petunias" 
and the Topical Revue, follow. The feature 
is "The Dangerous Age." A new "Our 
Gang" Comedy, "The Champeen," and 
organ selections finish. 



Detroit Notes 

(Special to THE FILM DAILY) 
Detroit — Geo. Spaeth has post- 
poned his trip to the Orient. 



Walter Long has joined the local 
United sales force. 



Floyd Wadlow will install a new 
$6,500 organ in his Virginia. 



The Capitol is celebrating its first 
anniversary. 



The Second Annual Motion Pic- 
ture Day Celebration will be held in 
the Statler Ballroom, Feb. 14. 



Art Hoganson, former Fox sales- 
man, has resigned to become manager 
of the Pantheon and Alhambra in 
Cleveland. 



Kenneth Fitzpatrick, of Fitzpatrick 
& McElroy, has left for the Coast. 
He will be gone about three or four 
months. 



A. R. Archer, formerly connected 
with the Aliens in Montreal, has 
taken over the management of the 
Quo Vadis. 



Jo Rok Prod. Formed 
Jo Rok Prod, have been formed to 
distribute the Joe Rock comedies. 
Headquarters in the Mecca Bldg. 



MOTION PICTURE ARTS, Inc. 

Now Producing Only Authorized 
Screen Story With 

MONSIEUR EMILE COUE 

JOHN L. McCUTCHEON Directing 

M. Coue Said to Elmore Leffing well. 
Writer, "You Know My Story! Tell It 
to the World, for the Good It May Do!" 

Lewis Allen Browne Adapted It 

Schuyler E. Grey, Production Manager 

James S. Brown Jr., Photography 

Distributed by 

Educational Film Exchanges, Inc. 



Phil Gleichman, of the B'way 
Strand, has booked "Suzanna," "One 
Exciting Night," "Jazzmania" and 
"Thorns and Orange Blossoms." 



Charles Meade has been appointed 
sales manager for United Artists in 
Northwest Canada. Meade was 
formerly connected with the local 
Paramount office. 




Have Your Titles 

Made the Right Way 
Q uality — Q uantity 
24 hour Service 

FARINA & OGLE 

Title Photographers 

At Claremont Laboratories 

430 Claremont Parkway 

Tel. Bingham 2100 



TO ALL EXHIBITORS: — 

POLA NEGRI'S 



First and ONLY 

AMERICAN MADE PICTURE 



IS 



u 



Bella Donna" 



A George Fitzmaurice Production 

Presented by Hamilton Theatrical Corp. 

Miss Negri has NEVER appeared